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20

Both projects support nearly the entire DirectX libraries (though SlimDX does support a bit more in the DirectX 9 space). SlimDX is very mature, and fully featured. Some larger scale, commercial games have been written and published using SlimDX. It also provides more of a "framework" to use, and has more feature-complete documentation. SharpDX promises ...


12

I just went through the pain of learning matrix transformation, but using XNA. I found these articles to be very helpful in understanding what happens. The method calls are very similar in XNA and the theory behind it all should apply to you, even with SlimDX. From glancing at your code, I think you should be translating at the start, to the origin, and ...


8

I found some helpful information in this forum post. Note the question on that forum related to VB but this is still good info. Full credit to Simon O'Connor. Reformatted and edited slightly. INVALIDCALL usually means that either a parameter you've passed to D3D is invalid or an operation you've requested isn't possible. The easiest way to find ...


8

I have not worked with the Kinect before and you didn't specify which drivers/wrapper you are using, but I suspect that it probably won't matter. What you will probably need to do is the following: Seperate the "Update" cycle for the Kinect onto it's own thread. That will leave your application logic free to run as fast as it can without being stopped ...


8

Write a DLL using Microsoft Visual C++'s compiler. Use standard C++ with SSE intrinsics and/or OpenMP for the heavy numeric code, with #pragma unmanaged. Use #pragma managed to define a clean C++/CLI API which C# can use. C++ interop is quite a bit faster than p/invoke. And C++/CLI is the only elegant way to deal with both garbage collected memory and ...


7

Of all those options, assuming you're discarding off-the-shelve control libraries for charting/graphing - WPF seems to be the easiest way to integrate any graphics with WinForms (if you can, why not go all the way and make everythingin WPF?). Have you seen this famous WPF Graph Example here? To give you an idea, I put something like 16 graphs on my ...


7

Honestly, if performance is your primary concern I would go with the API that gets you closest to the hardware. Less obfuscation = more speed. In that case, from the choices you've provided, SlimDX is the best option, followed by XNA, and lastly, WPF. No, DirectX must use efficient data structures and algorithms. Think about it-- would games that utilize ...


7

Yes, you can use DirectX 10, 11, and DirectWrite using the D3DImage in WPF by creating your render target surface as shared, and then creating a DX9 texture based on that shared texture handle to use in WPF. This means that essentially you can use 10, 11, and DirectWrite the same way you use DX9 with no additional overhead, and no airspace issues. A ...


7

You can look at the sample now. It's just been checked in to our repository, so you'll need to use SVN to get it (or wait until we ship the Feb 2010 release): http://code.google.com/p/slimdx/source/detail?r=1356


6

Constant buffers need their data aligned properly; the SizeInBytes property needs to be a multiple of 16, which is the case for a Matrix (4*4*4), but not the case for Color3 (4*3).


6

I use GDI for my cartographic application. While GDI+ is slower than, say, DirectX, I find that there are a lot of things and tricks that can be used to speed things up. A lot of CPU is used for preparing the data before drawing it itself, so GDI should not be the only bottleneck there. Things to look out for (and these are general enough to apply to other ...


5

AI War used SlimDX for a while, until they switched over to Unity. Chris's original blog post on choosing the platform is here, and his follow up on the API after he switched to Unity is here. (N.B. I am one of the SlimDX developers)


5

It's kind of awkward to answer my own question, but after some more digging and by simple trial and error, I found the solution. At first, I had to change the way I loaded my texture. To prevent it from internally resizing to a Power-of-Two size, I had to use the following method: Texture texture = Texture.FromFile(_graphicsDevice, [filePath], ...


5

I haven't used SlimDX, but based on my experience with XNA and reading about SlimDX's objective. I'd suggest SlimDX. XNA while it can be used for other things is primarily a Game Engine, not a Rendering Engine. It's got lots of specific optimizations & methodology geared towards Games. Also, XNA likes to pre-build it's resources into DirectX Files (.x) ...


5

We're uisng SlimDX together with DirectShow.Net for the version 2 of a mid-sized multimedia application which consist of a server and client component. We used it only on the client component. I would say it's production-ready. If you're migrating code from the old MDX to SlimDX as we do, there's quite a bit of quirk to take care of. It's simply because MS ...


5

First, make sure you installed the SlimDX Developer SDK, not runtime redistributable. If you've done that, by default, it will be installed into Program Files\SlimDX SDK (release date)\Bin\x86 (and x64, depending on the platform).


4

My "guess" is that you aren't running Vista. Direct3DEx can only be created on a Vista machine. Edit: Change your code to Direct3D m_d3d = new Direct3D(); And that "should" fix you.


4

We just recently added a sample covering this topic to our repository. The relevant source file is here.


4

Is it possible that your graphic card has problems drawing NPOT-textures (non-power of two). If so, increase the texture size to the next POT. This resolved many drawing issues for me (using SlimDX too). Btw...I also used SlimDX for 2D rendering, but haven't made use of sprites, but draw all the things as "primitives" and using a vertex buffer. Maybe this ...


4

I've found the problem with my code. I need to use the DXGI to retrieve the shared handle (not pointer). The follow code works perfectly SlimDX.DXGI.Resource r = new Resource(tex); Texture2D tex2 = device.OpenSharedResource<Texture2D>(r.SharedHandle);


4

Try borrowing this guy's code... you'll have to translate it from VB but appears most of what you're looking for is there.


4

I eventually managed to fix it. The key was in using the CopySubResourceRegion method on the stereoized texture back to the backbuffer, specifying its dimension (e.g.: 1920 x 1080 instead of 3840 x 1081).


4

Direct3D 10 and 11 are not too different in API or how they work. A SwapChain is used to present to an hWnd, not required to render. This is the same with DX10, and even the very different DX9. In any case, this example I made should be enough to help you take your Texture2D that you render to and pass it to WPF. Don't remember if I finished the DX11, ...


4

I used it in this way. The mouse handling is the same. using SlimDX.DirectInput; private DirectInput directInput; private Keyboard keyboard; [...] //init directInput = new DirectInput(); keyboard = new Keyboard(directInput); keyboard.SetCooperativeLevel(form, CooperativeLevel.Nonexclusive | CooperativeLevel.Background); keyboard.Acquire(); [...] //read ...


4

GDI is software only rendering, as well as GDI+ which handles alpha channel for transparency rendering. These two libraries are really limited and slow compared to a GPU based one. My suggestion is that you should invest the time to implement a SharpDX Direct2D based drawing engine. I never heard about the issue you talked about with forms, I use SharpDX ...


4

Considering your shader binary is held in a byte[] bytecode (since i'm not sure where you load it from, but it's just binary data once saved) DataStream ds = new DataStream(bytecode.Length, true, true); ds.Write(bytecode, 0, bytecode.Length); ShaderBytecode bc = new ShaderBytecode(ds); Then to load in dx11 Effect: Effect effect = new Effect(device,bc);


4

To invert Y you need to reflect point by XZ plane. finalMatrix = finalMatrix * Matrix.Reflection(new Plane(0,-1,0, 0));


4

There shouldn't be any numerical inconsistencies. Of the three floating-point datatypes in .NET (float, double and the F type not available to C# but used internally in many members) there are going to be three times they come up: The storage and definitions done by your application's mathematical engine. The calculation done by this engine. Rendering. ...


3

The move to SharpDX is pretty simple, there's a couple of changes in naming, and resource description, but apart the fact that it's relatively cumbersome (depending on the size of your code base), there's nothing too complex. About effects framework, you have the library SharpDX.Direct3D11.Effects that wraps it, so you have it of course supported. It's ...


3

I don't believe you need to manually capture inputs. This typically would be handled by the direct input keyboard class. I personally have not used SlimDX myself yet but as it is a wrapper for DirectX (which I've dabbled in) you should just need to initialize a variable to hold the reference to the keyboard so that you can poll it for changes, and then act ...



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