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62

You'll have to be specific as to what you mean by "the rest". Except for the object inspector (that I"m aware of), emacs does all the above quite easily: editor (obvious) compiler - just run M-x compile and enter your compile command. From there on, you can just M-x compile and use the default. Emacs will capture C/C++ compiler errors (works best with ...


32

SLIME and swank form a client server architecture to run and debug lisp programs. SLIME is the emacs frontend and swank is the backend. In between they create a network socket and communicate by sending across messages (S-expressions). In short it is just an RPC mechanism between emacs and the actual lisp backend. The fact that the slime and swank are ...


26

I have to recommend Emacs Code Browser as a more "traditional" IDE style environment for emacs. EDIT: I also now recommend Magit highly over the standard VCS interface in emacs.


19

You're getting "Unable to resolve symbol" exceptions because :require doesn't pull in any Vars from the given namespace, it only makes the namespace itself available. Thus if you (:require foo.bar) in your ns form, you have to write foo.bar/quux to access the Var quux from the namespace foo.bar. You can also use (:require [foo.bar :as fb]) to be able to ...


19

Another vote in favour of clojure-mode and slime under Emacs. In particular, if you set up auto-complete, then you can use my ac-slime package to get context-aware tab completion in a dropdown list. Here's a screencast showing it in action. And, further to technomancy's comment about hippie-expand, here's how to tie slime completion into hippie-expand. ...


18

Instead of running a make command in the shell window, have you tried M-x compile? It will run your make command, display errors, and in many cases make it very easy to jump to the line of code that caused the error if the output includes filenames and line numbers. If you're a fan of IDEs, you might also want to look at emacs' speedbar package (M-x ...


18

Yes. In the documentation to Slime you will find slime-lisp-implementations. Here is how I have it defined in my .emacs: (setq slime-lisp-implementations '((cmucl ("/usr/local/bin/lisp") :coding-system iso-8859-1-unix) (sbcl ("/usr/local/bin/sbcl" "--core" "/Users/pinochle/bin/sbcl.core-with-swank") :init (lambda (port-file _) (format ...


17

That's pretty rare to see. #+clim clim:+red+ #-clim mygraphics:+red+ above means that the reader returns either red symbol and it depends whether there is a symbol with the name CLIM is on the list of features *features*. That's a built-in mechanism in Common Lisp. #.(cl:if (cl:zerop (cl:random 2)) :high :low) Above also is a mechanism of the reader. ...


16

You can use SLIME's C-c C-k before switching to the REPL, for slime-compile-and-load-file. It will prompt you to save the file if you haven't already. When it's done, the things which you've redefined should be available at the SLIME REPL in their new versions. Then you could use C-c C-z to bring up the REPL (close it with C-x 0 when you don't need it ...


16

I know it's not exactly what you asked for, but maybe this will be helpful to other noobs like me. You can execute a SLIME command to exit, so you'll have a nice, clean emacs left over. In a SLIME buffer, type in , (comma). You're placed in the minibuffer and SLIME asks which command to execute. Type in sayoonara and hit Enter. You should see SLIME ...


16

If you're working with CL or other lisps, I can recommend to install & use the paredit - it helps a lot to write & manipulate s-expressions


15

(sb-ext:restrict-compiler-policy 'debug 3) in the repl or your .sbclrc will do it.


14

As expected, it turns out it was quite simple. To stop a running operation use the command slime-interrupt (C-c C-c).


14

If I understand you correctly, ns-unmap should do what you want: user=> foo java.lang.Exception: Unable to resolve symbol: foo in this context (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1) user=> (def foo 1) #'user/foo user=> foo 1 user=> (ns-unmap (find-ns 'user) 'foo) nil user=> foo java.lang.Exception: Unable to resolve symbol: foo in this context (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1) ...


14

You can use the standard functions find-method and remove-method to do it: (remove-method (find-method #'frob '(:before) '(vehicle t))) I find it's much easier to use the slime inspector. If your function is named frob, you can use M-x slime-inspect #'frob RET to see a list of all methods on frob and select individual methods for removal.


13

Setup a hook in .emacs: (defun clojure-slime-maybe-compile-and-load-file () "Call function `slime-compile-and-load-file' if current buffer is connected to a swank server. Meant to be used in `after-save-hook'." (when (and (eq major-mode 'clojure-mode) (slime-connected-p)) ...


13

I heartily recommend nREPL.el for various reasons: swank-clojure is dead officially, but has been dead for a long while. While it was getting some job done, nothing much has changed or improved in it after its initial inception. The development of swank-clojure required significant expertise in Common Lisp, which Clojure developers generally lack and are ...


12

SLIME's contrib directory seems to have SWANK implementations for MIT Scheme and Kawa.


12

It's actually Sharpsign Plus followed by Sharpsign Dot.


12

Couple of corrections. First, doc is a macro not a function. Also functions and macros can be stored in a var. Second, in clojure 1.3, which is likely the version you are using, doc is stored in the var clojure.repl/doc, not clojure.core/doc (as it is in 1.2). In the namespace user, doc is "used", aka there is an implicit "(use [clojure.repl :only [doc])". ...


12

clojure-jack-in starts a SLIME session for your current project. It does this by generating a random port number, running lein jack-in with this port number in a sub-process, waiting for the swank server to start and then calling slime-connect with the port number. Since lein jack-in is used to start the swank server, you obviously need to use Leiningen ...


12

Clooj is implemented in Clojure and people seem to like it. I don't believe it has any extension mechanisms yet though, but when it does, I'm sure they'll be written in Clojure.


11

There are corners of emacs that once discovered make you more productive in ways you never thought of. As others have mentioned, using tags is a fantastic and fast way to zoom around your source code and using M-/ (dabbrev-expand) often does exactly what you expect when completing a variable name. Using occur is useful to get a buffer with all occurences ...


11

Hit control c twice. If you're in *slime-repl clojure* then C-c C-c will kill the process and return you to the repl prompt. If you're in the *inferior-lisp* buffer, then you'll probably kill the clojure process, meaning that you'll have to restart slime (with M-x slime). If you don't have a slime repl buffer then, M-x slime-repl should give you one. You ...


11

Well, you can start your first SLIME normally, then (require 'swank.swank) (or maybe it's required by default... not sure), do (swank.swank/start-repl port) with port replaced by some port number and you can connect a second instance of SLIME to that newly created REPL. I've done it just now, with one Emacs connecting to a REPL started with lein swank, ...


11

Can't help with swank or Emacs, I'm afraid. I'm using Enclojure on NetBeans and it works well there. On matching: As Alex said, \w doesn't work for non-English characters, not even the extended Latin charsets for Western Europe: (re-seq #"\w+" "prøve") =>("pr" "ve") ; Norwegian (re-seq #"\w+" "mañana") => ("ma" "ana") ; Spanish (re-seq #"\w+" ...


11

Yes, it is a common problem for programmers to write infinite loops in development :). And the answer is very simple. It's called "Interrupt Command" and it is C-c C-b Leiningen has nothing to do with this. This is SLIME/Swank/Clojure. When you evaluate code in Emacs you are spawning a new thread within Clojure. SLIME keeps reference to those threads and ...


11

You can use the following trick: Define a dispatch function for shebang: (set-dispatch-macro-character #\# #\! (lambda (stream c n) (declare (ignore c n)) (read-line stream) `(eval-when (:compile-toplevel :load-toplevel :execute) (pushnew :noscript *features*)))) In your script file use #-:noscript: #!/usr/local/bin/sbcl ...


10

You can find detailed description of emacs & version control integration on my site. I'm also working on article about using Emacs as Development Environment for many languages - C/C++, Java, Perl, Lisp/Scheme, Erlang, etc...


10

If you're using SLIME this can be done easily with M-. EDIT: When Clojure code is compiled the location of definitions is stored. Note that this works best when you compile entire files. Jumping to an definition that you evaluated with C-x C-e doesn't work so well (tho it does works for Common Lisp and SLIME).



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