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38

If you want to search for a single scalar in an array, you can use List::Util's first subroutine. It stops as soon as it knows the answer. I don't expect this to be faster than a hash lookup if you already have the hash, but when you consider creating the hash and having it in memory, it might be more convenient for you to just search the array you already ...


19

Answering specifically "why does the order matter in one version but not in a previous one": the smart match operator was badly designed in 5.10.0 in a way that made it difficult to use reliably, and made the given/when construct less useful than it could be, so the semantics were changed with 5.10.1 and all future versions will pretend that the 5.10.0 ...


15

Smart Match, see perldoc perlsyn Per a request in the comment, I'll give a little more: Smart Match is an operator for arbitrary data types that attempts to make sense of an equality test knowing nothing more than the types of arguments, many of the tests require complex operations like iteration and regex application


13

In addition to the other answers, the list of Perl 5.12 changes has a section on changes made to the ~~ operator. So Learning Perl may have been correct prior to these changes.


13

Remove the slashes from your regex: my $name = qr{(\w+)}; Since you're wrapping the regular expression in qr{}, everything inside the braces is being interpreted as the regular expression. Therefore, if you were to expand out your search, it'd be: print "ok\n" if $line ~~ /\/(\w+)\//; Since your string doesn't start or end with slashes (or have any ...


12

For a second, lets consider the slightly different \@a ~~ (1,2,3) ~~ evaluates its arguments in scalar context, so the above is the same as scalar(\@a) ~~ scalar(1,2,3) \@a (in any context) returns a reference to @a. 1, 2, 3 in scalar context is similar to do { 1; 2; 3 }, returning 3. So minus a couple of warnings*, the above is equivalent to \@a ...


11

The version of ~~ in 5.10.0 was based on the then current perl6 design, which was commutative. Because 5.10.0 took so very long to be released, by the time it came out, the perl6 smartmatch had been greatly improved (including no longer being commutative), but no one in perl5 development noticed in time to fix perl5's implementation. It was fixed in ...


10

Fast for small numbers of potential matches, but not faster than the hash. Hashes are really the right tool for testing set membership. Since hash access is O(log n) and smartmatch on an array is still O(n) linear scan (albeit short-circuiting, unlike grep), with larger numbers of values in the allowed matches, smartmatch gets relatively worse. Benchmark ...


9

Smart match tries to do what I think you're expecting if you use an array or an array reference on the right side -- but not a list. $ perl -E '@a = (1, 2, 3); say (@a ~~ (1, 2, 3))' $ perl -E '@a = (1, 2, 3); say ((1, 2, 3) ~~ @a)' # also misguided, but different 1 $ perl -E '@a = (1, 2, 3); say (@a ~~ [1, 2, 3])' 1


8

The "smart" in "smart match" isn't about the searching. It's about doing the right thing at the right time based on context. The question of whether it's faster to loop through an array or index into a hash is something you'd have to benchmark, but in general, it'd have to be a pretty small array to be quicker to skim through than indexing into a hash.


8

You can't use @returned because of how Perl passes arguments to subroutines. (Arrays are flattened into the argument list and lose their identity.) Pass an array reference instead: cmp_ok($known_value, '~~', \@returned, 'testing method abc') The smart match operator is smart enough to do the right thing. From perlsyn: Note that the smart match ...


6

Start with What is the difference between a list and an array? in the perlfaq. It specifically shows you how your choice of values is wrong. You might also start by writing out why you expected each to work or not work, so that we might correct your expectations. Why did you think you'd get the results that you expected? As for the smart match bits, ...


5

Looks like smart matching works in scalar context with slices. Consider the following code pieces: Your case: #!/usr/bin/perl my @foo = (1,2); my @bar = (3,4); print @foo[1,2] ~~ @bar[1,2] ? "Equal\n" : "Not equal\n"; That's probably what you need: #!/usr/bin/perl my @foo = (1,2); my @bar = (3,4); print [ @foo[1,2] ] ~~ [ @bar[1,2] ] ? "Equal\n" : ...


5

(stolen from Learn Perl): Binary "~~" does a smart match between its arguments. http://perldoc.perl.org/perlsyn.html#Smart-matching-in-detail What does it do? "It depends" mostly on the the type of the arguments provided. The page linked above has excruciating detail on what the variations are.


5

It is the smartmatch operator. In general, when you want information about operators in Perl, see perldoc perlop


5

If Learning Perl says that, it's wrong outdated (although it does tend to work out that way in many cases). What the smart matching operator does is mainly determined by the type of the right argument; see the table in the perlsyn documentation for specifics.


5

You can see that it does very different things depending on the order and types of its arguments if you go to Smart Matching in Detail.


4

Interesting. perlsyn states: Any ~~ Regex pattern match $a =~ /$b/ so, at first glance, it seems reasonable to expect use strict; use warnings; use 5.010; my $string = '12 23 34 45 5464 46'; while ( $string ~~ /(\d\d)\s/g ) { say $1; } to print 12, 23, etc but it gets stuck in a loop, matching 12 repeatedly. Using: $ perl -MO=Deparse y.pl ...


4

The meaning of short-circuiting here is that evaluation will stop as soon as the boolean outcome is established. perl -E "@x=qw/a b c d/; for (qw/b w/) { say qq($_ - ), $_ ~~ @x ? q(ja) : q(nein) }" For the input b, Perl won't look at the elements following b in @x. The grep built-in, on the other hand, to which the document you quote makes reference, ...


4

Yes, in the sense that when one of the arguments is an Array or a Hash, ~~ will only check elements until it can be sure of the result. For instance, in sub x { ... }; my %h; ...; %h ~~ \&x, the smart match returns true only if x returns true for all the keys of %h; if one call returns false, the match can return false at once without checking the rest ...


4

If you reverse the match it will work: $item ~~ @$items or $item ~~ $items # Smart-matching works with references too. PS: get used to adding use strict; to the start of your program. It will point you to a few mistakes in your code :)


3

Because an array and a list are not the same thing. $v ~~ @keys_h is matching a scalar against an array, (Any vs Array in the smart match behavior chart) returning true if the scalar matches an element of the array. $v ~~ keys %h is matching a scalar against a list. There is no rule for matching against a list, so the list is evaluated in scalar ...


3

In the first case, the right side of the ~~ operator is evaluated in scalar context, so the expression 1..5 is the flip-flop operator, becoming true when $. is 1 and becoming false after $. is 5. The true or false value of the flip-flop is then used as the RHS of the smart-match (I believe it will be treated as a numeric 1 or a string "" respectively, but I ...


3

The smartmatch operator obviously doesn't take lists as operands. As such, it evaluates its operands in scalar context. If that was the end of the story, the following wouldn't work my @a = ('aaa', 'bbb'); my $s = 'aaa'; say $s ~~ @a; because it would be the same as say 'aaa' ~~ 2; But it's clear that it does work. That's because smartmatch ...


3

The smart match operator ~~ does its magic for arrays, not for lists. An array slice is a list, not an array. Update: You can solve it just by enclosing your slices into brackets, since smart match automatically dereferences: print +([@x[0,1]] ~~ [@y[0,1]]) ? "equal\n" : "not equal\n";


3

You don't need smart matching here. The ~~ with a single regex on the right hand side and a string on the left hand side might as well be a =~, just like you have it. What are you trying to do? For your match, you have two ways to go. If you want to use a string as a pattern, you need to use the match operator: basename($subdir) =~ m/$regex/ If you want ...


3

Test::Deep provides many utilities for testing parts of (possibly very deeply nested) structures, and also produces quite useful diagnostics in case of failures. I believe one of its bag functions could do the job for you. use Test::Deep; my @foo = ('bar', 'baz', 'moo'); cmp_deeply( \@foo, superbagof('baz'), '@foo contains at least one "baz"', ...


2

Automatic dumping with Test::More, Test::Most: use Test::More 0.82; diag explain \@returned; use Test::Most 0.21; show \@returned;


2

Here is a quick untested change to your example: my @regexes_to_filter_a = (qr/^tmp$/, qr/^temp/, qr/del/); my @organism_dirs = (); # this will hold final list of dirs to processs my @subdirs = File::Find::Rule->directory->maxdepth(1)->in($root_dir); foreach my $subdir (@subdirs) { unless (basename($subdir) ~~ @regexes_to_filter_a) { ...


2

That's because smartmatch takes a reference first. @array ~~ $num would be equivalent to \@array == $num, which obviously is very very unlikely to be true. You might want to use my Smart::Match module and do @array ~~ array_length($num), @array ~~ contains($num) and other things in a non-surprising way.



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