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7

Because: std::atomic may be instantiated with any TriviallyCopyable type T. Source: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/atomic/atomic And std::is_trivially_copyable<std::shared_ptr<int>>::value == false; Thus, you cannot instantiate std::atomic<> with std::shared_ptr<>. However, automatic memory management is useful in multi-...


4

The only way to ensure that an object lives "as long as any object of B is living" is by keeping a refcount of B objects. It's the only realistic way to tell if there are any living B objects, if they are going to be arbitrarily created and destroyed as the program runs. std::shared_ptr internally keeps refcounts, which are tracked atomically. It's probably ...


3

I defined a regular function: void stackOfX509Deleter(STACK_OF(X509) *ptr) { sk_X509_free(ptr); } Then I use it in my code: using STACK_OF_X509_ptr = std::unique_ptr<STACK_OF(X509), decltype(&stackOfX509Deleter)>; STACK_OF_X509_ptr chain(loadIntermediate(cert.string()), stackOfX509Deleter);


3

std::shared_ptr<T>::get() returns a T*, but your operator<< overload (correctly) takes a reference rather than a pointer. Change cout << month.my_tacoTuesdays.at(0).get(); to cout << *month.my_tacoTuesdays.at(0); Or if any shared_ptr instance can be null, if (auto* p = month.my_tacoTuesdays.at(0).get()) { cout << *p; ...


2

Pay attention to the type of cout: cout << month.my_tacoTuesdays.at(0).get(); It is printing the std::vector<std::shared_ptr<tacoTuesdays>>::at(0).get(0), which is a pointer tacoTuesdays*, so cout print the raw pointer address for you. To get what you want, you should pass tacoTuesdays's const reference, like this: cout << *month....


2

The problem with the member function get_shared in the question is that it allows calls by both unique_ptr and shared_ptr with a difficult to distinguish between the two, thus unique_ptr is allowed to call this method and fails. Moving the get_shared to be a static method which gets the pointer to share from, allows the distinguishing between unique and ...


1

Use multiple static factory functions and conversion functions. To address your comments, I've added get_shared to support copying a shared pointer. This compiles and is available here: http://ideone.com/UqIi3k #include <iostream> #include <memory> class Foo { std::string name; Foo(const std::string& _name) : name(_name) {} public: ...


1

That's exactly what I was looking for, making sure that clients may reach a point that sharing is required and it will work transparently without really caring if they are with a shared Pet or with a unique Pet (i.e. making the interface easy to use correctly etc.). It sounds like the x-y problem to me. To "make sure that clients can share if required", ...


1

Here is the solution wanted: #include <memory> #include <iostream> #include <mutex> using std::shared_ptr; using std::weak_ptr; struct A { A() { std::cout << "A() called" << std::endl; } ~A() { std::cout << "~A() called" << std::endl; } }; struct B { B() { std::cout << "B() called" << ...



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