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If you create a unique_ptr and a shared_ptr to the same object, they will not know about each other. Therefore, you will end up with a "double free" error, not to mention that you might inadvertently dereference one pointer when the other one has already been freed. In short, don't do it. If you need to transfer ownership from a unique_ptr to a shared_ptr ...


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No. As long as you have obj *o = new ... you're still returning a plain pointer and not a new type. A new type (a smart pointer class) is required so that you can use the destructor to deallocate the memory. If all you have is a plain pointer -- you have to delete it manually. (It is possible to come up with a global garbage collector -- each new ...


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Even though you are counting references correctly, you are still sharing the same pointer between the instances. So getline is modifying the same str object. You need to implement Copy-on-write in str. Here is what's wrong: std::istream& getline(std::istream &is, str &s) { s.data->clear(); //should make a copy of data first ...


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When you call: test.push_back(s); // This line doesn't work here - why? now s and a copy of s in test share the same data. During the next iteration of the while loop getline function calls s.data->clear(), which clears data in both s and the copy of s in test. When you call: test.push_back(str(s.begin(),s.end())); the str(s.begin(),s.end()) ...


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Tile needs to have a copy (or move) constructor and assignment operator for use with std::vector. nTiles_.push_back(tile) copy-constructs a new Tile object from the local tile. In that for loop, at each iteration, the local object tile gets constructed, then a copy gets pushed into the vector, and then the local tile gets destructed. This is why destructors ...


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There is 2 reasons of Tile destruction in your code: The local variable that you copy inside vector, and the internal copy when vector resizes internal memory. To avoid the former, you have to emplace back the new element; for the later, you have to reserve place in vector. It results in something like: TileMap::TileMap(const std::vector<int>& ...


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Unfortunately, C++ isn't really well-designed for this. one option is to do something like Peter Dimov's technique at http://lists.boost.org/boost-users/2003/02/2996.php. In some applications, you can avoid this entirely by just having B's clone returns shared_ptr<A>. (I realize that is kind of cheating, which is why I began with Peter Dimov's more ...


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You can always fake covariant return types. struct A { virtual shared_ptr<A> getA(); shared_ptr<A> get() { return getA(); } }; struct B : A { virtual shared_ptr<B> getB(); shared_ptr<B> get() { return getB(); } shared_ptr<A> getA() { return getB(); } };



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