Hot answers tagged

29

A more extensive listing of problematic word characters if (buffer.IndexOf('\u2013') > -1) buffer = buffer.Replace('\u2013', '-'); if (buffer.IndexOf('\u2014') > -1) buffer = buffer.Replace('\u2014', '-'); if (buffer.IndexOf('\u2015') > -1) buffer = buffer.Replace('\u2015', '-'); if (buffer.IndexOf('\u2017') > -1) buffer = buffer.Replace('\u2017'...


17

When I encountered this problem I wrote an extension method to the String class in C#. public static class StringExtensions { public static string StripIncompatableQuotes(this string s) { if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(s)) return s.Replace('\u2018', '\'').Replace('\u2019', '\'').Replace('\u201c', '\"').Replace('\u201d', '\"'); ...


15

This sounds like a Unicode issue. Joel Spolsky has a good jumping off point on the topic: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/Unicode.html


12

You could replace all that preceed a word character with the left quote, and all that follow a word character with a right quote. str = str.replace(/"(?=\w|$)/g, "&#8220;"); str = str.replace(/(?<=\w|^)"/g, "&#8221;"); // IF the language supports look- // behind. Otherwise, see below. As pointed out ...


12

I don't think that one is better than the other in general; it depends on how you intend to use it. If you want to store it in a DB column that has a charset/collation that does not support the right single quote character, you may run into storing it as the multi-byte character instead of 7-bit ASCII (&rsquo;). If you are displaying it on an html ...


11

Typographically, the correct glyph to use in sentence punctuation is the quote mark, both single (including for apostrophes) and double quotes. The straight-looking mark that we often see on the web is called a prime, which also comes in single and double varieties and has limited uses, mostly for measurements. This article explains how to use them ...


9

The mysql database is using UTF-8 encoding. Likewise, the html pages that display the content are using UTF-8. The content of the HTML can be in UTF-8, yes, but are you explicitly setting the content type (encoding) of your HTML pages (generated via PHP?) to UTF-8 as well? Try returning a Content-Type header of "text/html;charset=utf-8" or add <...


8

#+LANGUAGE: de #+OPTIONS: ':t also does the right thing now


8

With &rsquo; you know for certain that the output will be correct, no matter what. I wish &apos; would output the proper apostrophe and not the typewriter apostrophe. It’s 2013, for Christ’ sake!


7

The ’ in Moe’s is the only character in your example string that wouldn't be valid if that string is latin1 encoded but your mysql server expects utf8. Simple demonstration: <?php function foo($s) { echo 'len=', strlen($s), ' '; for($i=0; $i<strlen($s); $i++) { printf('%02X ', ord($s[$i])); } echo "\n"; } // my file is latin1 ...


7

I would look for a mismatch between the character encoding used in your Web interface and that used at the database level. If your Web interface uses UTF-8, for example, and your database is using the default MySQL encoding of latin1, then you need to set up your tables with DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8. Use mysql_real_escape_string() or mysqli, by the way. ...


7

This is only available in very recent versions of org-mode. If you are not already running the latest git version see http://orgmode.org/worg/org-faq.html#keeping-current-with-Org-mode-development for instructions on upgrading. Then (setq org-export-with-smart-quotes t) will do what you want with quotes, and m-dashes will also be exported correctly.


6

The quotation marks in word are not the "regular" quotation marks. Word automatically replaces quotations as you type them with fancy ones called "smart quotes". Since your browser does not understand smart quotes it replaces them.


5

At least in the title or in the text, it looks much better to have typographic double quotes (i.e. is more pleasant to the eye). Coding sites should not do this for actual code, i.e. in StackOverflow code that is indented by four spaces. If a double quote in text is converted to typographic, it's fine. This gets really worse when you paste typographic ...


5

Glibc (and the GNU libiconv) supports //TRANSLIT and //IGNORE suffixes. Thus, on Linux, this works just fine: $ echo $'\xe2\x80\x99' ’ $ echo $'\xe2\x80\x99' | iconv -futf8 -tiso8859-1 iconv: illegal input sequence at position 0 $ echo $'\xe2\x80\x99' | iconv -futf8 -tiso8859-1//translit ' I'm not sure what iconv is in use by PHP, but the documentation ...


4

It sounds like the real problem is that your database is not using the same character encoding as your page (which should probably be UTF-8). In that case, if any user submits a non-ASCII character you'll probably see weird characters in the database. Finding and fixing just a few of them (curly quotes and em dashes) isn't going to solve the real problem. ...


4

Note that what you have is inherently a corrupt CSV file. Indiscriminately replacing all typographer's quotes with straight quotes won't necessarily fix your file. For all you know, some of the typographer's quotes were supposed to be there, as part of a field's value. Replacing them with straight quotes might not leave you with a valid CSV file, either. I ...


4

These smart quotes are a unicode point. All you need is a simple String.Replace to sort them out. -edit- Something like: mystring.Replace("\u201C","\"").Replace("\u201D","\"")


4

You might want to look at what Pandoc does—apparently with the --smart option, it handles quotes properly in all cases (including e.g. ’tis and ’twere). I recently wrote a Javascript typography prettification engine that does, among other things, quote replacement; I wound up using basically the algorithm suggested by Renesis, but there’s currently a ...


4

There are at least 1,114,111 valid Unicode code points. My US-standard keyboard makes those that fall between 1 and 127 (base 10) reasonably easy to access. When you venture beyond that range you start getting into either old style locales, or more modern UTF8 (or other Unicode) code points. Many of these code points are easily accessible from a keyboard ...


4

This is now built into org-mode 8.x. To activate it, add the following to your Emacs configuration file: (setq org-export-with-smart-quotes t) It works for single quotes, double quotes, and apostrophes. Source: @Ista


3

I have a whole great big... program... that does precisely this. You can rip out the script and use it at your leasure. It does all sorts of replacements, and is located at http://bitbucket.org/nesteruk/typografix


3

In theory HTML has <q> element to solve that problem. Unfortunately in practice you'll get either no quotes copied at all (IE doesn't support it, Gecko doesn't copy quotes) or smart quotes copied.


3

Character set can be switched in phpmailer with the following code: $myMail->CharSet = "UTF-8"; This solved my issue. Typographic quotes and double dashes show up in my emails from phpmailer as expected now. This may have been a sorta noobish question (blush). Thanks, Col. Shrapnel for prompting me to look into what encoding all the pieces of the ...


3

/** * @param {string} input the string with normal double quotes * @return {string} string with the quotes replaced */ function quotify(input) { var idx = 0; var q = ['«', '»']; return input.replace(/"/g, function() { var ret = q[idx]; idx = 1 - idx; return ret; }); }


3

Replace the last line of your code with this one: name = name.replace(u"\u2018", "").replace(u"\u2019", "").replace(u"\u201c","").replace(u"\u201d", "") The replace method returns a modified string but it does not affect the sting you call it on so you have to assign the return value to the variable as above.


2

This is an unfortunately all-too-common problem, not helped by PHP's very poor handling of character sets. What we do is force the text through iconv // Convert input data to UTF8, ignore any odd (MS Word..) chars // that don't translate $input = iconv("ISO-8859-1","UTF-8//IGNORE",$input); The //IGNORE flag means that anything that can't be translated ...


2

According to the Character Map application that comes with Windows, the Unicode values for the curly quotes are 0x201c and 0x201d. Replace those values with the straight quote 0x0022, and you should be good to go. String.Replace(0x201c, '"'); String.Replace(0x201d, '"');


2

update table set column = replace(replace(column, chr(147),'"'), chr(148), '"')


2

REPLACE(REPLACE(str, '`', ''''), '´', '''') Or am I missing your question?



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