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6

In SML, the type operator * binds more tightly than ->: it has a higher precedence just like * has a higher precedence than + in arithmetic. This is why string * string -> string is the same as (string * string) -> string and not string * (string -> string). To read your example, we'd need to put parentheses around the * before worrying about ...


5

SML's approach to types really doesn't work very well with overloading, which is why you can't define your own overloaded functions. But -- the overloading of arithmetical and relational operators is so widespread in programming languages that the designers of SML accepted the standard overloading of +, * etc. This presented a problem with SML's type ...


4

I think you want a functional deque. See e.g. Okasaki's paper on the subject. Specifically, Figure 5 shows an implementation of deques.


4

There's nothing wrong with it, it's just redundant. ('a * 'b -> 'b) -> 'b -> ('a list -> 'b), ('a * 'b -> 'b) -> ('b -> ('a list -> 'b)) and ('a * 'b -> 'b) -> 'b -> 'a list -> 'b are all equivalent because -> is right associative. So we usually write the version with the least parentheses (just like one usually writes ...


4

That's a result of the value restriction in SML. As the language infers types for your program, it can find expressions that would work for any type, which it represents with type variables. The map function is a good example. (My syntax might be a bit off because I've never used SML.) fun map f nil = nil | map f (x::xs) = f x :: map f xs Since ...


3

If I had to guess, I would say that this has to be due to the fact that the second version is not making use of as much laziness as the first, yet it seems that regardless of the context, if you force any bit of the result, then you force the entire computation. For example, let's say I wanted to do: val x = hd ($drop(10, l)) For the first version, we ...


3

You can add a type constraint: > valStr.value: Pair.pair; val it = (1.0, 2.0): Pair.pair Poly/ML tries to print the type in a helpful way but it can't guess which will be the most helpful in any particular case when there are multiple equivalent types.


2

From here, it says that the type of before is before : ('a * unit) -> 'a, and as your type error specifies, it is expecting the type of the second argument to be of type unit, however, you have supplied something of type int. Try doing val x = (3+1 before ()) and you should get the expected result. The intended purpose is to have the second argument be ...


2

There is an element of taste in using curried vs. non-curried functions. I don't use curried functions as a matter of course. For example, if were to write a gcd function I would tend to write it as a function designed to operated on a tuple simply because I seldom have use for a defined partially-instantiated gcd function. Where curried functions are ...


2

The Unicode escape sequence \u03B5 corresponds to UTF-16. Your terminal probably runs UTF-8 in which ε is 0xCE 0xB5. Entering them as decimal bytes: > print "\206\181\n"; ε


2

-> is right associative in SML type annotations, so int list -> (int * string -> int) is correct. Consider this simple experiment in the REPL: - fun add x y = x+y; val add = fn : int -> int -> int add is a function which, when fed an int, returns a function, namely the function which sends y to x + y -- hence its type is int -> (int ...


2

The easiest way to do this is to use rev. Basically, the idea is to cons onto left in each iteration. Your left subsequence will then be in reverse order, which is where rev comes in. It is unfortunate that you have to make two passes over the subsequence, but there really isn't anything else that you can do that will be much faster. The performance gain ...


2

Isn't wat supposed to be hidden? It's "hidden" in the sense that code cannot refer to it; but since you as a human are aware of it, there's no reason for the REPL to be evasive about it. Why am I seeing values of type real wat? Why not? The identifier wat is not in scope, but the type-name still exists. There's no reason there can't be values of ...


2

Consider pascal 1 0. If you're using zero-based indexing for the table then this should be equal to 1. But: pascal 1 0 = pascal 0 -1 + pascal 0 0 = 2 You should put some guards to deal with negative indices and indices where j is greater than i.


1

Inaimathi is probably correct that there is a simpler way to do what you want, though it is still a good exercise to fix your definition so that it works. When I enter your fun definition in SML/NJ I get the error stdIn:10.1-14.30 Error: unresolved flex record (can't tell what fields there are besides #1) This means that SML's type inference can't ...


1

Try Display *dpy = XtDisplay(shell); XCreateBitmapFromData( dpy, DefaultRootWindow(dpy), ... );


1

real is not an equality type in SML 97. That means you cannot use = to compare two reals.


1

If it is an int list you can do something like this: fun printIntList ints = app (fn i => print(Int.toString i ^" ")) ints; Then printIntList [1,2,3] will print 1 2 3 You can do similar things for other types. On edit: This is the best you can do with straight SML. SML/NJ has its own extensions including "access to compiler internals" and ...


1

The SML 97 specification defines the behavior of overloaded operators in Appendix E. For *,+,- the default type is int. For / the default type is real. This helps maintain the "Standard" in in "Standard ML."


1

Your understanding is correct (though your final line should read 2::3::5::7::[]). This code seems to be an SML modification of a famous piece of Haskell code. In the Haskell version, primes is defined as a lazy list which is conceptually infinite (end then e.g. take 100 primes would give you the first 100 primes). The link I gave above has a nice ...


1

Yes your function definition is correct. :: or Cons as it is called in Lisp and other functional programming languages is used for creating lists. It takes a value and a list (which may be empty) and creates a new list with the former prepended to the latter. So for example 42::[17, 23] equals [42, 17, 23]. Cons is right associative which means that your ...


1

The point it to add the number at a given index to the rest of the list (to index j+1,j+2,... rather than 0,...,j-1): fun prefixSum [] = [] | prefixSum (x::xs) = x::addToEach(x, prefixSum xs); Here is a way without addToEach which uses a tail-recursive helper function: fun prefixSum' (sums, []) = sums | prefixSum' ([], x::xs) = prefixSum' ([x],xs) | ...


1

You seem to have the right idea, although it doesn't look as if your helper will ever terminate. Here's a way of implementing it without a helper. fun look_and_say [] = [] | look_and_say (x::xs) = case look_and_say xs of [] => [1,x] | a::b::L => if x=b then (a+1)::b::L else 1::x::a::b::L And here's a way of ...


1

The problem is that if your is_divisible reaches the last case it should return false because it means that all the iterated divisors have resulted in a remainder larger than zero except for the last one which is the number it self. So you should rename is_divisible and return false instead of true


1

Personally, I like the fact that SML isn't a pure functional language. Keeping track of function calls is naturally done via side effects (rather than explicitly passing a counter variable). For example, given a generic recursive Fibonacci: fun fib 0 = 0 | fib 1 = 0 | fib n = fib(n-2) + fib(n-1); You can modify it so that every time it is called it ...


1

If SML has support for nested functions you could do like this: divmod(number : int, divisor : int) = _divmod(n : int, d : int, count : int) = if n < d then (count, n) else _divmod(n - d, d, count + 1) _divmod(number, divisor, 0)


1

Change the m - multiply(m, n - 1); to m - multiply(~m, n - 1);. (and the same for the other n -... line) The way you have it, you're subtracting a negative number from itself, so you're effectively canceling it out, and triggering a base case of 0. Trace: = multiply (3, -10) = -10 - multiply (2, -10) = -10 - (-10) - multiply (1, -10) = -10 - (-10) - (-10) ...


1

Both of the implementations that you provided are actually the same. The second case of your second implementation is a special case of you your third pattern. For your first implementation, size(Node(Empty,1,Empty)) will recurse one the left subtree, returning 0, recurse on the right subtree, which returns 0, and then adds 1, yielding the result 1. In ...


1

This is close, but not quite right. depth(Node(Node(Empty,1,Empty),2,Empty) will recurse on the left subtree, which is a single node, so it will return 0. Then it will recurse on the right, which is empty, returning 0. You will then take the max of 0 and 0, returning 1, which is probably not what you want. Instead, you would have to match the empty case, ...


1

Your intuition is correct, trav t_1 gets evaluated first as function arguments are evaluated in left to right order. This might seem a little strange, since @ is an infix operator, but [1, 2, 3] @ [4, 5, 6] can actually be rewritten as (op @)([1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]). You can verify that @ evaluates its left argument first by doing: Standard ML of New Jersey ...



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