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63

Archive libraries (.a) are statically linked i.e when you compile your program with -c option in gcc. So, if there's any change in library, you need to compile and build your code again. The advantage of .so (shared object) over .a library is that they are linked during the runtime i.e. after creation of your .o file -o option in gcc. So, if there's any ...


28

.so files are dynamic libraries. The suffix stands for "shared object", because all the applications that are linked with the library use the same file, rather than making a copy in the resulting executable. .a files are static libraries. The suffix stands for "archive", because they're actually just an archive (made with the ar command -- a predecessor of ...


26

To generate a shared library you need first to compile your C code with the -fPIC (position independent code) flag. gcc -c -fPIC hello.c -o hello.o This will generate an object file (.o), now you take it and create the .so file: gcc hello.o -shared -o libhello.so EDIT: Suggestions from the comments: You can use gcc -shared -o libhello.so -fPIC ...


24

Recent versions of gcc/ld default to linking with --as-needed. This means if you write -lexternal before the C file the library will automatically get excluded (the order matters when testing if things are "needed" like this) You can fix this with either of: gcc -L. -o program program.c -lexternal gcc -L. -Wl,--no-as-needed -lexternal -o program ...


10

.a are static libraries. If you use code stored inside them, it's taken from them and embedded into your own binary. In Visual Studio, these would be .lib files. .so are dynamic libraries. If you use code stored inside them, it's not taken and embedded into your own binary. Instead it's just referenced, so the binary will depend on them and the code from ...


9

I highly highly recommend using the LSB app / library checker. Its going to tell you quickly if you: Are using extensions that aren't available on some distros Introduce bash-isms in your install scripts Use syscalls that aren't available in all recent kernels Depend on non-standard libraries (it will tell you what distros lack them) And lots, upon lots of ...


7

There are decompilers, but a decompiler might not emit code in the same language that the original program was written in. There are also disassemblers, which will reassemble the machine code into assembly. The Decompilation Wiki may be a good source of additional information.


7

I'm the creator of LangPop.com, which measures a number of metrics to try and gauge popularity. My philosophy is to simply try and measure a lot of different things and let people see the results, and judge for themselves. All of the metrics have flaws, biases and advantages, too. In terms of SO tags, besides C#, they look fairly accurate, but there's a ...


7

Libc uses a symbol versioning. It's rather advanced wizardry, but basically each symbol is attached tag according to version where it appeared. If it's semantics changes, there are two versions, one for the old semantics with the version where it first appeared and another with the new semantics and the version where it appeared. The loader will only ...


5

Stackoverflow is an extremely biased sample, and the tags counts may further distort the figures. Because Joel Spolsky is a primary marketing tool for SO, and he favors Microsoft technology, it's greatly over-represented here. The bias is then amplified as people interested in other platforms sense that this site isn't for them and stop participating. The ...


5

The solution is to put the generated module name before the other modules it depends on, on the g++ command-line. g++ -fPIC -shared -o mymodule.so mymodule.cpp `pkg-config --cflags --libs python` `pkg-config --cflags --libs opencv` -I/usr/local/include/opencv2/legacy The gcc man page says of the "-l" option, It makes a difference where in the command ...


5

This should answer your question: http://stackoverflow.com/a/1908981/856199. Windows uses the COFF format, Linux uses ELF. Those are not compatible. Furthermore, Windows and Linux have different ABIs (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Application_binary_interface). That means the code, even if it were to load and execute, would result in garbage since ...


5

The answer is "JNI" :) Here are a couple of links: How to compile dynamic library for a JNI application on linux? http://learn-from-the-guru.blogspot.com/2007/12/java-native-interface-jni-tutorial-hell.html http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/guides/jni/


5

LD_PRELOAD (not LD_PRELOAD_PATH) is a list of specific libraries to be loaded before any other libraries, whether the program wants it or not. LD_LIBRARY_PATH is a list of directories to search when loading libraries that would have been loaded anyway. On linux you can read man ld.so for more information about these and other environment variables that ...


4

If you'd like to help your users by giving them compiled code, the best way I know is to give them a statically linked binary + documentation how they can run the binary. (This is possibly in addition to giving the source code to them.) Most statically linked binaries work on most Linux distributions of the same architecture (+ 32-bit (x86) statically linked ...


4

C++ mangles symbol names. If you want to avoid the mangling, the function must be declared as extern C, like so: #include <stdio.h> extern "C" void PutLoLoLo(){ puts("Lololo"); } Then the link: $ g++ -shared -fPIC lolo.cc -o lolo.so -Wall Will give you what you expect: $ nm -D --dynamic --defined-only ./lolo.so 000000000000061c T ...


4

The short answer is no, you still need to compile your library for each targetted platform -- however, assuming your code is written such that it is cross-platform, you can set up your build to target both Windows and Linux environments with little fuss. I do this now using CMake to generate both Visual Studio projects for Windows environments and Makefiles ...


4

Look for dlopen with RLTD_NOLOAD: RTLD_NOLOAD (since glibc 2.2) This doesn't load the library. This can be used to test if the library is already resident (dlopen() returns NULL if it is not, or the library's handle if it is resident).


4

.so files are shared objects. Usually shared libraries are made as .so. By making a library a .so u achieve efficiency in memory usage. i.e. when multiple applications which use the library are running, the library is loaded into the memory only once as opposed to the case of static libraries. Creation of dynamic library: gcc -Wall -fPIC -c *.c gcc ...


4

The _ZN13KeypathHelper11getCacheObjEv symbol is a mangled name for KeypathHelper::getCacheObj() (you can easily translate using c++filt, for example). Given that you have only added a method and whatever is loading the shared object cannot find it makes me think that you either haven't updated the shared object or forgot to provide a definition for ...


4

The order of import statements matter. As documented in the python language reference: Once the name of the module is known (unless otherwise specified, the term “module” will refer to both packages and modules), searching for the module or package can begin. The first place checked is sys.modules, the cache of all modules that have been imported ...


4

Don't do this. The most reliable way would be to make a complete static built library stack. But this will totally bloat your application and if there ever is any security issue in these libraries, you will need to update this yourself and all your users will need to re-download. By using the distribution provided SDL libraries, your application will ...


3

Check that debugging information was properly loaded for .so file. Look at the output of command (gdb) info sharedlibrary. If your library appears with asterisk (*) symbol in loaded libraries table then debug symbols were not loaded and gdb unable to stop at breakpoints in this .so.


3

Ideally, you'll want to use GNU autoconf, automake, and libtool to create configure and make scripts, then distribute the library as source with the generated configure and Makefile.in files. Here's an online book about them. ./configure; make; make install is fairly standard in Linux. The root of the problem is that Linux runs on many different ...


3

There are two good sites that track these sorts of things... LangPop TIOBE Although I wish they showed C# right up there with Java, I'm not that surprised that most places are still using Java, or people are searching for Java, or there are lots of Java jobs. I don't have any particular reason to think they are being unfairly biased.


3

If you have the source, or if you have the right kind of .lib file, you can statically link. (Note, however, that DLLs also sometimes come with a .lib file, and that file is just a shim for calling into the DLL.) If you can statically link, you'll have a single executable. Other than that, make an install directory and put the DLL into the same directory ...


3

You need to compile your shared library with g++. Also, you made a mistake with -fPCI. Should be -fPIC. Either that, or for some strange reason you retyped your Makefile here instead of using cut and paste. So, the line should look like: $(D_LIB):$(OBJ) $(CXX) -o $(D_LIB) -lm -lpthread -shared -fPIC $(OBJ) $(LIB) Compiling with g++ links the support ...


3

Maybe it is better to locate your configuration file(s) in a folder related to your actual module/application? Determine the location of your module might not be straight forward, but this thread should help. One tool which maybe useful, configparser, has a function which actually looks for configuration files in some standard locations: ...


3

You need to link with -lstdc++ Using g++ to link (instead of gcc or ld) does that automaticaly. See Compiling C++ programs in the GCC manual: However, the use of gcc does not add the C++ library. g++ is a program that calls GCC [...] and automatically specifies linking against the C++ library. N.B. the options -Wall -Wextra -Werror ...



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