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6

If you want to pretend to send a request from a different IP address, then you will actually have to send the request from a different IP address. TCP/IP is a fundamental addressing mechanism to deliver data packets across the web. If you want to communicate with someone, you both need to know each others actual addresses, else you won't be able to talk to ...


4

If it's the constant value 5 then 5U is ok, otherwise just cast the value like int s; unsigned int u; s = 5; u = (unsigned int) s; although if the value is negative, then the conversion wont just make it positive 5, for that you can use this int s; unsigned int u s = 5; u = (unsigned int) ((s < 0) ? -s : s);


3

The htonl function is declared in <arpa/inet.h>. Assuming you have a proper #include for that header: #include <arpa/inet.h>` the declaration uint32_t htonl(uint32_t hostlong); will be visible, so the compiler knows the expected argument type and the result type. If you want to pass the value 5 to the htonl function, just pass it: ...


3

Each header must end with a \r\n instead of \n. And there is an additional \r\n to add at the end of the request : GET /index.html HTTP/1.1\r\n Host: www.example.com\r\n \r\n


3

From recvfrom() call docs: [EAGAIN] or [EWOULDBLOCK] The socket's file descriptor is marked O_NONBLOCK and no data is waiting to be received; or MSG_OOB is set and no out-of-band data is available and either the socket's file descriptor is marked O_NONBLOCK or the socket does not support blocking to await out-of-band data. simplified ...


3

You're not interpreting the right error because of the intervening logDebug1 call. You have a send that returns something <= 0 and possibly an errno that you could inspect You print something (logDebug1) which likely clobbers errno You do some sort of perror which interprets the clobbered errno What you want to do instead is check if sentBytes < 0, ...


2

Server performs a little check to make sure it is actually Client that it trying to make the connection Impossible and nonsensical. The Client class is at the other end of the connection. It is not magically transmitted to your accept() method. If you want to validate your client you will have to build something into your application protocol. Notes: ...


2

You can get the raw image's data with Image.tobytes() and rebuild it from raw data with Image.frombytes(), cf http://pillow.readthedocs.org/en/latest/reference/Image.html#PIL.Image.Image.tobytes and http://pillow.readthedocs.org/en/latest/reference/Image.html#PIL.Image.Image.fromstring Pickle is a notoriously unsafe protocol FWIW so better to stick with raw ...


2

TCP can handle infinitely long data streams. There is no problem with the sequence number wrapping around. As it is initially random, that can happen almost immediately, regardless of the length of the stream. The problems are in your code: DataOutputStream fileTransmissionStream = new DataOutputStream(transmissionSocket.getOutputStream()); FileInputStream ...


1

you have to change in nginx configuartion like that location /socket.io/ { proxy_pass http://xxx.xxx.xx.xxx:3000; proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8080; proxy_http_version 1.1; proxy_set_header Upgrade $http_upgrade; proxy_set_header Connection “upgrade”; proxy_read_timeout 86400; access_log off; error_log ...


1

Cache the data once only, and have each client handler keep track of where it is in the download, all using the same cache. Once all clients have all the data, the cached data can be deleted.


1

Now when my producers produces data and the server pushes it to the client, all clients will have to wait until all clients have downloaded the data. The above shouldn't be the case -- your clients should be able to download asynchronously from each other, with each client maintaining its own independent download state. That is, client A should ...


1

I'm doing something similar in a game sort of, it's like cards against humanity with gifs, but it's multiplayer over a server, so I can tell you how I accept different clients. I just have my server class extend Thread, and in the constructor, I have an empty array of Sockets, and in the run() method, I have what you had with the try{} catch(Exception){} ...


1

You are correct. You could have added the TCP segment is wrapped in an IP packet send the IP packet out


1

After going through Official reasons for "Software caused connection abort: socket write error" I am not able to figure out what exactly is closing the socket. If you had really gone through it you should have found my answer which makes it clear that nobody is closing the socket, whether improperly or otherwise. It is caused by a network condition, ...


1

There are two problems that you have to fix to make this work. First, on both the client side and the server side, you have to put the select inside the loop, not outside. Otherwise, if there was something to read before you got to the loop, you'll recv over and over, and if there wasn't, you'll never recv. Once you fix this, you can get rid of the ...


1

Here read_size = recv(new_socket, pBuf, buffersize, 0); recv() tells you how much bytess it received for the current iteration, namly read_size bytes. And here write_size = fwrite(pBuf, 1, buffersize, text); you ignore the number of bytes received, but always write buffersize. Fix this by writing to the target file the actual received amount of data: ...


1

It is the accept that returns a new socket id for the new connection that got established. If accept fails there is no connections anyways. And with new socket on successful accept you can use getpeername to determine the client details. select or poll will only notify activity on socket and not give any more details. You need to depend on accept to check ...


1

The problem is here: // read data into buffer dataReception.read(bs); Read doesn't read exactly that amount of bytes that you want to have in that array. It can read any number of bytes. Therefore you always have to check the return value of the read operation; and only when all expected bytes were read ... you should continue! The reason that your ...


1

while (in.ready()) { // ... } Classic misuse of ready(). Exchange all this for: String inLine; while ((inLine = in.readLine()) != null) { CommunicationValues.MESSAGE_MEMORIZER = inLine; } Presumably there is more code that you haven't shown us: otherwise all this will do is memorize the last line sent.



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