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There could be several issues in your code e.g., drop parentheses when you are specifying a target: Thread(target=t1). If f is a function then f() calls it immediately. You are also mixing asyncore with blocking code and multiple threads. If you want to make several http connections concurrently; you could use a thread pool instead: import urllib2 from ...


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You're repeated sending the same object via serialization - and ObjectOutputStream notices that, and instead resolves this to references to the same object. If you want to effectively send a separate object on each call, add this to your loop: streamOut.reset(); That way, every time you write the object, it will write it out as if it's never seen it ...


1

It sounds like you're trying to connect to the same device, even as it might be getting a new IP address? MAC address is one way to do that. Per this blog post, you can read from /proc/net/arp and parse this information out, because Android is Linux-based. The MAC address-IP address mappings are stored in this file, and you can use the extracted IP address ...


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using threads is not mandatory, you just need to setup one listening socket that fires a socket for each incoming connection and a bunch of sockets for the connections versus the other clients, and pool/select on every socket for events...


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IIRC You can just count how many connections that have a status of SYN_RECV for that particular IP and port that you're listening on. Whether you use a child process to execute netstat and grep (or similar utilities) for that information, or write a binding to get this information using the *nix C API, is up to you.


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The complete solution description can be found above in the question. As per Dale's pointer, I provide a brief explanation of the solution here. The crash was due to compiling Boost for Blackberry using the default optimization level 3. Once we dropped the optimzation level from -O3 to -O2 the crash evaporated. We have since modified the Blackberry.cmake ...


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Multi-byte data (2/4/8-byte integers, 2/4-byte string characters, etc) can be represented in memory in either little endian or big endian. When exchanging data between machines, especially when they use different endian architectures, the data has to be normalized during transmission. Socket API have standard hton...() (host to network) and ntoh...() ...


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Back in node v0.4 this functionality existed for both sending and receiving but it was later removed. You'll have to write your own binding to allow you to send/receive file descriptors on an existing fd (your unix domain socket, whose fd should be accessible in node IIRC). Here are some links to get you started.


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Yes, you should use SSL such as the SSLSocketFactory. You will have to have a look at JSSE, here is a tutorial in case you are curious. Taken from the linked tutorial: SSLSocketFactory factory = (SSLSocketFactory)SSLSocketFactory.getDefault(); SSLSocket socket = (SSLSocket)factory.createSocket("www.verisign.com", 443); /* ...


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It looks like content of your system.out. Application server redirects standards out and error streams to its log. If you want to get rid of it, then comment that line out. System.out.println(b + ":" + ((char) b));


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Change this: printf ("\n binded successfully"); to this: printf ("\n binded successfully\n"); (i.e., add an \n to the end). This will cause an fflush to be performed on standard output, so that the "success" output will actually be printed to the screen, and you can see that you've entered the while-loop and are waiting for a connection. ...


1

The connect method of your HTTPClient is blocking, if your 2nd host doesn't except the connection, your try/except block is exciting after the timeout. Your except block isn't closing the socket so acynscore.loop() is still waiting for it. Try my modifications below and see if they confirm the problem. I've put some print statements around the connect ...


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Search MSDN for "CSocket + thread" and you will find this example: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/175668/en-us


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Are you handling the exception correctly .. try: s.connect((host,port)) except socket.error, (value,message): if s: s.close() print "Could not open socket: " + message """Code to handle a retry""" On getting an error .. you can retry by doing a bind and listen again.. Also you need to have retry count ..say 5 and then perhaps ...


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Actually, none of the Ember-Data adapters return objects immediately. How would they? REST is asynchronous too. :) What they're returning are proxies for objects. Specifically, DS.PromiseObject and DS.PromiseArray. They allow you to work with the objects as if they were real, and as soon as the asynchronous promise resolves, the bindings get updated ...


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You have two devices 1. Android device running an app and acting as a client 2. Computer running an AIR app and acting as a server Each of those devices will have it's own IP address on the network. In your case android device IP is 192.168.137.2, and computer IP is 192.168.137.3. In order for client to connect to server there must to be some means of ...


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Just set a read timeout with Socket.setSoTimeout(). Set it to higher than the expected request interval, say double that. If it expires, you will get a SocketTimeoutException: close the socket. Contrary to some of the comments, isConnected(), isBound(), isClosed() etc are no use for this. They tell you whether you connected, bound, closed, etc. the Socket. ...


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The problem is you pass string as pointer. Pointer is only valid in the same process. If your C# is 2.0 or above, change your struct to this: [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack = 1)] public unsafe struct Packet { public uint packet_type; public fixed char file_name[??]; public fixed char template_name[??]; public fixed char ...


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Even though I never tried such approach, I think you cannot simply share data between 2 distinct applications using winsock, then just passing pointer. Memory is protected between both. You will need to serialize your data to a memory stream. Using the proper classes with Encoding etc. for your strings. Then deserialize it in your C++ app. Try something ...


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You have several problems: On C# side the marshal size is you defined as 32 bytes instead of 4 + 2 * 8 * 4 = 68 bytes. It would be better to remove Size field in StructureLayout In C++ you defined char instead of wchar_t, on the C# side there are Unicode strings You defined pointers instead of array so: sizeof(Packet) is 20. memcpy copies outside the ...


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class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { var serverEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Parse("127.0.0.1"), 8500); NetUDP udp = new NetUDP(serverEndPoint); UdpClient localClient = new UdpClient(); Task.Delay(20000); var dgram = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("Hello Server"); localClient.Send(dgram, ...


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How are you testing this? Assuming you open a socket and connect to the host you should see that you are in fact receiving the correct line as well as the last one. Why? Because in the for loop you keep changing the value of f, the last value of f will be the last line in the file, and you send it back after sending data (which at that point is the correct ...


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send() returns the number of bytes transferred to the socket send buffer. If it returns 50,000, then 50,000 bytes were transferred. If you didn't receive them all, the problem is at the receiver, or in the network. You would have to post some code before any further analysis is possible. Probably you're expecting to receive all those bytes in a single ...


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If you're wanting to implement some kind of packet-capture system, you don't want to be using the normal IP layer. Instead, you'll be wanting a PF_PACKET socket. For that you may wish to use IO::Socket::Packet. For example, to quote the supplied example program capture.pl: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use IO::Socket::Packet; use ...


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You don't need a buffer the size of the file. This just wastes memory and adds latency, and obviously it doesn't scale to large files. See this answer for the correct way to copy streams. If you need to keep the socket open after the transfer, you need to know the length beforehand, and you need to modify the loop condition to while (total < length ...


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You cannot bind a connection to another machine. A proxy is supposed to: accept an inbound connection from a client create its own client connection to the next server (typically the client would specify this, unless you handle this in your proxy's configuration) pass data back and forth between the two connections as needed So, a client would connect ...


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It sounds like you have a good grasp on the logistics and have been able to build a solution that works but that you're a bit dissatisfied with its overall architecture. One approach that many PHP projects use when incorporating real-time features is to use an external realtime network to pass data between clients and the server as peers. For example, ...


0

You are using Winsock 1.1 and WSACancelBlockingCall() does apply to that version of Winsock. But since you cannot find WSACancelBlockingCall() in the DLL source code, then obviously it not actually using it. Try updating your app to use Winsock 2.0+ instead (just change your first parameter to WSAStartup()) and see if the problem goes away. ...


0

I think you are confusing the listen() system call, also implemented in Perl, with tcpdump listening on a network interface and capturing raw TCP or UDP packets. The listen() system call, used in servers, is called after you've created a proto-socket and bound it to an IP:port combo. After that the accept() system call returns real socket fds for each ...


3

This is the definition of a heartbeat packet. struct { HeartbeatMessageType type; uint16 payload_length; opaque payload[HeartbeatMessage.payload_length]; opaque padding[padding_length]; } HeartbeatMessage; Incorrect handling of the payload_length field is what caused the heartbleed bug. However this whole packet is itself encapsulated within ...


1

The Heartbleed Wikipedia article explains the exploit quite well. To paraphrase, RFC 6520 is an extension to the TLS protocol for a "Heartbeat Request" message (a kind of keep-alive mechanism). The request consists of a 16 bit length field and a message to match, and the response is supposed to echo the provided message. OpenSSL's implementation has a bug ...


0

Spawn a new thread and instantiate your socket there.


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Actually my template is correctly set and my path too. I just forgot to use: $scope.$apply();


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I would have each slave process execute on two permanent threads. On one thread, the process would connect to the master process and then receive instructions on which file to send to which other slave processes. For each other slave process in an instruction, this thread would create a temporary thread to send the file. On the other permanent thread, the ...


2

Yes, if the application terminates, the socket will close. Ideally you should close the socket when you're done using it. Keep in mind if you don't properly close or flush the socket before terminating your application, any data in the buffer or stream attached to the socket may not be sent.


0

Thanx bro... its work for my litle aplication. I modify it and it can work with Inputstream /* * To change this license header, choose License Headers in Project Properties. * To change this template file, choose Tools | Templates * and open the template in the editor. */ package LitleClientServer; import java.io.BufferedReader; import ...


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Uh, I think I should ping the Broadcast-IP and listen for answers instead... Android's Linux runtime allows it to read from which IP an answer is coming.


1

Your copy loop is nonsense. The canonical way to copy a stream in Java is as follows: while ((count = in.read(buffer)) > 0) { out.write(buffer, 0, count); } where 'count' is an int, and 'buffer' is a byte[] array of length > 0. I usually use 8192.


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You should try surrounding the broken code with try-catch block and print out the error message from the stack. this would give you a better idea of what is not working. It's not a solution, I know, but it's easier to find a solution if you know the exact problem.


0

You need to create some API on your server. I would go with the REST JSON API, so that your Android client will make a request to the following URL: http://yourhost.com/api/images And the response would be: [ {"name":"foo", "url":"http://yourhost.com/foo"}, ... ] I believe you can achieve that with many Java server-side frameworks, but the idea ...


1

From the looks of it, it seems like AZSocketIO implements an automatic reconnection strategy, and SocketIO.objc doesn't.


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Just read and write the bytes. There's nothing different about sending files as against sending anything else, except maybe you need to send the name and possibly the length as well.


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No. A port is a number, a protocol is a specification. They are associated, for convenience, but not identical. And ports are part of TCP/IP, not Unix. The entire question is basically just a category mistake.


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Quick Ports and protocols are different things, but usually protocol has default port, so default port for http protocol web server is 80. Explanation Port is tcp/ip level entity, this is endpoint where binary network requests are sent. Protocol is application level entity, it is used as language to communicate between client and server. Basically you ...


0

Services, such as "ftp" and "http" have default ports. In this case, 443 and 80. So they do correspond to ports. I would, however, not call them "the same thing". You could, for example, perform http protocol over a different port if you wish. When you type http://something:8080 in your browser, for example, you are doing http over port 8080. In the case of ...


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I would use byte[]. It will get the job done.


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Make sure your templates are actually only HTML fragments (no tags like <html>, <body> etc.). Is the path to the fragments correct? You can manually check in your browser if the path is accessible. Here is a working plunker.


1

Have a quick look at getaddrinfo. This will populate multiple addrinfo structures, and return them to you. A quick example (stolen partially from Beej): int sockfd; struct addrinfo hints, *servinfo, *p; int rv; memset(&hints, 0, sizeof hints); hints.ai_family = AF_UNSPEC; // use AF_INET6 to force IPv6 hints.ai_socktype = SOCK_STREAM; if ((rv = ...


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service.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr(What do I put here?); It should be ip address of server, //if server is localhost service.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("127.0.0.1");. Also on the port the MSDN example used htons() htons converts host byte order to network byte order.



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