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0

When you need to get the same data to 20 people, there is no good alternative to sending it 20 times. When you would like to conserve your bandwidth, you could go for a distributed peer-to-peer approach with WebRTC which is a (not yet officially standardized!) Javascript API which allows web browsers to send data to other web browsers. With such a system ...


0

await and WhenAny do not start any operation. They merely wait for a running operation to complete. All reads that you have started will complete eventually and data will be taken from the streams. This is true whether you observe the result or not. I understand you want to relay data from client to server and from server to client. So why not start two ...


2

You must convert the arg[0] (String) to int with: Integer.parseInt(arg[0]) ServerSocket doesn't have constructor with ServerSocket(String)


2

ServerSocket Server = new ServerSocket (Integer.parseInt(args[0])); args[0] is string, needs to be parsed in int


1

The constructor parameter is of type int, while the arguments given to main are of type String. Solution is simply to use Integer.valueOf(args[0]) to parse the argument into an integer. You might want to add more robustness checks, etc - but for a quick fix this should work.


0

The problem is with your protocol. You send the file and then the name. But the client has no way of knowing when the file ends and the name begins. You can fix it by first sending the length of the name and then the actual name: #include <arpa/inet.h> // Write the file name with length marker uint_32t nameLength = htonl(strlen(fine)); ...


0

Maybe your phone connect to net via proxy. Proxy server with sth wrong~


0

You need to read one line. Your present code tries to read everything until end of stream, whuch only happens when the peer closes the connection.


0

When server sending back, does the client require to open port 12345 in Firewall? No. If the client's firewall permitted the outbound connection, it will permit the return traffic. If yes, it's hard to configure all ports since source port is dynamic. Impossible, actually. Of course there are always ways to mis-configure firewalls ...


-1

public String convertStreamToString(java.io.InputStream is) { BufferedReader br = null; StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); String line; try { br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(is)); while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) { sb.append(line); } } catch (IOException e) ...


0

You're only reading one image in the client and then closing the connection, so the next send gets this exception. The stuff in the first finally block should be inside the prior catch block. The next read throws a SocketException: socket closed, but as you're ignoring all exceptions you missed it. NB Thread.sleep() is a static method that sleeps the ...


1

You have to remember IP address and port of the client computer that had sent the register message. Then you can send messages from server to client at any time. For testing purposes I suggest TCPView (from Sysinternals Suite) and 'hercules' from HW group.


0

You can try https://github.com/walkor/workerman. It's a socket framework for php. Websocket example: Create websocket_server.php <?php require_once './Workerman/Autoloader.php'; use Workerman\Worker; use Workerman\Lib\Timer; // Listen 2347 port use websocket protocol $websocket_worker = new Worker("Websocket://0.0.0.0:2347"); // Example create one ...


0

What do you mean under "the connection is lost"? In case of IP base connections you cannot determine easily a lost connection. I think you should check it yourself time-to-time. Send a special packet or use ICMP.


0

gethostbyaddr and similar functions are dependant of your resolv.conf (see http://linux.die.net/man/5/resolv.conf). your DNS resolver is slow (try using Google's Public DNS) some IPs do not have PTR records or their NS are offline, the default timeout is 5sec - keep that in mind while "looping" To improve performance you might want to parallelize it, use ...


5

buff is declared as char*, and sizeof(char*) is the size of the pointer itself, not the size of the data being pointed at. On your system, a pointer is 8 bytes (i.e. your app is compiled for a 64-bit OS). Don't use sizeof(buff), use Temp.length() or strlen(buff) instead (add +1 if you need to send the null terminator as well). Also, your stringstream is ...


0

It seems you are not updating the wline to the stream values inside the loop.


0

If I'm reading your question correctly, this issue is that you're hitting the /game/deal endpoint with an HTTP request, not a socket request. If this is the case, the Game.subscribe call isn't going to do anything because the server has no socket to subscribe! If you look in your terminal, you'll probably see Sails complaining: `Model.subscribe()` called ...


1

Trello uses a combination of WebSockets and polling to perform instant updates. Most clients use WebSockets all the time; the few that don't support WebSockets use short HTTP polling instead. It also uses a single HTTP poll to "catch up" after losing a WebSocket connection and reconnecting. The iOS and Android apps connect using socket.io clients that are ...


0

This doesn't exactly do what you asked since the server doesn't send the data but I think it achieves what you want to do. You could pass along connection objects so that you can send the flag to it from MyHandler. From there you can use threading.Thread to have the communication to the clients happen in parallel. This is assuming that you only want one ...


0

If you're still struggling to find anything, this is a useful tutorial i found using swift. http://www.teehanlax.com/blog/how-to-socket-io-swift/ <----- Check SocketRocket out Either that or starscream by dalton cherry.


1

Your two client programs send different data. One sends \r\n-terminated lines. The other sends \n-terminated lines. Perhaps your server is expecting \r\n-terminated lines and this is why the latter example doesn't appear to work. Your non-Twisted example also closes the socket after the first line it sends but continues with its read-send loop.


1

Your problem is that you are using Readers and Writers for something that is not text. InputStream and OutputStream work with bytes; Reader and Writer work with encoded text. If you try to use Reader and Writer with something that is not encoded text, you will mangle it. Sending the request with a Writer is fine. You want to do something like this ...


0

I can reproduce this behaviour, and using Resource Monitor it is easy to see that Windows does indeed allocate 1GB of buffer space when the send() occurs. An interesting feature is that if you do a second send immediately after the first one, that call does not return until both sends have completed. The buffer space from the first send is released once ...


2

I am working with a small embedded device that has limited memory and I need to send a large file to a server from this device. Hence I cannot easily use HTTP POST which requires me to load the entire file into memory before sending. No, POST does not require that. All it requires is that the HTTP Content-Length header that you send matches the number ...


0

socket.io is now supported not only on node.js now. Quoting this answer: socket.io can be used in: Erlang, Android, Java, Lua, Objective-C, C, C++, QT QML, Perl, Go, Python, Ruby, Flash, Haxe, PHP, .NET, C++/Win32and unity3d. Just google for socket.io <your programming language>


0

I am giving Ajax use case as i don't have any idea how to use web sockets in php. however whole part should be quite simply translatable to web sockets. Lets assume each path have one fraction. So we create php file refresh.php. while($row = mysqli_fetch_array(result)){ $array[$row['RegionId']] = 'Fraction'.$row['FractionId'] ; } echo ...


0

You can take a look at these answers regarding connecting a socket and reading from it. Then it's a simple matter of opening a file and writing to it: open("output.dat", "a").write(data) The first parameter to 'open' is the file name, the second parameter is the mode (e.g. write, append, et cetera); the method called within the returned object 'write' has ...


1

I've no excact documentation about Trello but some ideas: You could use Wireshark, Charles or Fiddler to monitor the network traffic between your iDevice and Trello. Socket.io is a very nice thing and could be used with iOS (see here). It should be possible to live update a view with socket.io


0

Encode the string to bytes cause sendto() does not accept as string ... MESSAGE="Hello !!" soc.sendto(MESSAGE.encode('utf-8'), (dest_name, port)) con.recvfrom(MESSAGE.decode('utf-8'),BUFF_SIZE)


1

I see that you are writing the data in the wrong way, do you have a wrapper for the write() system call? The correct signature is ssize_t write(int fd, const void *buf, size_t count); so you must pass the length of the data you are writing, also check if it succeded writing by capturing the return value and checking it properly. The return value of 0 ...


0

In a blocking socket, the send() function does not return until the entire data supplied to it has been placed into the send buffer. That is not guaranteed. If there is available buffer space, but not enough space for the entire data, the socket can (and usually will) accept whatever data it can and ignore the rest. The return value of send() tells ...


0

I am pretty sure nothing is stored to disk when using sockets under normal circumstances. Of course someone could intentionally save all network traffic to disk or some of the data may be moved to swap. Socket is OS-level concept so unless your library is doing something behind your back, there is no difference whether you use C++, C# or Assembly. While ...


0

It will not save in hard drive unless you implemented a serialization(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serialization) in your code. If you don't allocate memory in heap, using new operator in C++ or malloc or its family functions if it is in case of C, it is not going to write anything in your heap. And while using heap it may access your hard drive memory but ...


0

RAM to wire then to RAM. No HDD involved. Yet, if the physical memory goes low, some memory pages containing data that came via the socket might be swapped out to disk. Other than that, no HDD is involved.


4

Not a dumb question, but not one we can answer either. It depends on the implementation and also how far down the stack you want to consider. In general, I would not expect the network stack to save the data to the disk. However, the OS might write it to disk as part of its virtual memory management (so, for example, if this is a security question, then ...


0

The Right Answer, which will protect you from differences in endianness, integer size, and future changes of the structure across server and client versions, is to use something like Google Protobuf. This is a library which will pack your structure members into a neutral packet format which can then be parsed on the other side. However, for someone ...


0

What you write to the UDP packet buffer is the content of the structure starting at the address of the structure. The receiving end should copy the received data into a buffer of the same size, then cast it to the exact same struct, defined the exact same way.


0

First and foremost: Use socket_strerror and socket_last_error to figure out your problem: if (!($result = socket_bind($socket, $host, $port)){ die(socket_strerror(socket_last_error($socket))); } You are trying to run your server script on a shared PHP hosting provider (ipage). These kind of providers do not generally allow to use the PHP sockets ...


0

So, all I ended up doing here was using two std::unordered_maps. One map was to store the port number (as a key) and the last system time in milliseconds that the TCPTable was queried to find the process ID that was bound to the port (the key). If the key didn't exist or the last time was greater than the current system time plus 2 seconds, then a fresh ...


0

You need to review a little bit your conception of PHP Namespaces, as Mfaspk's answer suggested it. We cannot have an autoloader in the package, as it is a library, not an application per se ; it will be included with other libraries. So, an autoloader in your own application should be taking care of the autoloading, not the library (otherwise, if each ...


0

For each request, there is no elegant solution, but you'll need to use a requests Session object and mount a new transport adapter for each request. You can find example code for the transport adapter in this issue comment, or you can use the adapter included in the requests-toolbelt package, like so import requests from requests_toolbelt.adapters import ...


-1

Not from any standard environment. Is there some random really obscure O/S or network hardware that places at arbitrary limits on connections per port? Probably, but it isn't something you will ever need to worry about. In practice, using multiple ports causes a number of issues (more chance of end user configuration challenges, etc) and provides no real ...


0

The usual way of deploying an Erlang program (I'm avoiding the word application here, as it's somewhat ambiguous in an Erlang context) involves building a release (see this for some background). A release is essentially a packaging of your Erlang code (which often consists of multiple applications - hence the ambiguity) and the parts of the runtime system ...


0

There was nothing wrong with the code itself - the issue was a consequence of it being in a library that was being called from some unit tests. It works fine when called from a standard Qt console app. As the unit tests can't really address the Bluetooth components properly anyway this is acceptable.


2

First create server socket and then socket which will create instance of client socket and then another socket object for accepting the connection. ServerSocket ss=new ServerSocket(7777); Socket socket=new Socket("localhost",7777); Socket socket1=ss.accept();


0

If you are using Eclipse just press the red square on the console tile to stop it and than you can reconnect


1

The IP addresses as read from the file are enclosed by "-signs. That is you do not pass "1.2.3.4" to inet_addr() but "\"1.2.3.4\"". And as "1.2.3.4" isn't a valid IP address (as 1.2.3.4 would be) the function fails. Just printing them out or inspecting them using a debugger would have shown you this.


0

Depends on the format. You might use deserialization or if there is custom serialization technique, interpret the bytes by yourself.



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