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367

Ada and SPARK (which is an Ada dialect with some hooks for static verification) are used in aerospace circles for building high reliability software such as avionics systems. There is something of an ecosystem of code verification tooling for these languages, although this technology also exists for more mainstream languages as well. Erlang was designed ...


211

A functional requirement describes what a software system should do, while non-functional requirements place constraints on how the system will do so. Let me elaborate. An example of a functional requirement would be that a system must send a an email whenever a certain condition is met (e.g. an order is placed, a customer signs up, etc). A related ...


210

NSLog(@"%@", NSStringFromSelector(_cmd)) _cmd is the SEL in any Objective-C method.


187

You're right yes. The architecture of a system is its 'skeleton'. It's the highest level of abstraction of a system. What kind of data storage is present, how do modules interact with each other, what recovery systems are in place. Just like design patterns, there are architectural patterns: MVC, 3-tier layered design, etc. Software design is about ...


145

To technically answer your question, you want: NSLog(@"<%@:%@:%d>", NSStringFromClass([self class]), NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), __LINE__); Or you could also do: NSLog(@"%s", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);


136

Thank God that the software-engineering people have not yet discovered functional programming. Here are some parallels: Many OO "design patterns" are captured as higher-order functions. For example, the Visitor pattern is known in the functional world as a "fold" (or if you are a pointy-headed theorist, a "catamorphism"). In functional languages, data ...


120

Tight coupling is when a group of classes are highly dependent on one another. This scenario arises when a class assumes too many responsibilities, or when one concern is spread over many classes rather than having its own class. Loose coupling is achieved by means of a design that promotes single-responsibility and separation of concerns. A ...


74

Well, I think that it boils down to the difference between good and good enough. While in most cases you can avoid the use of constants by implementing other patterns (strategy or perhaps flyweight), there is something to be said for not needing a half dozen other classes to represent a concept. I think what it boils down to, is how likely is there a ...


73

Your example terms; DataMapper, DAO, DataTableGateway and Repository, all have a similar purpose (when I use one, I expect to get back a Customer object), but different intent/meaning and resulting implementation. A Repository "acts like a collection, except with more elaborate querying capability" [Evans, Domain Driven Design] and may be considered as an ...


72

Architect's clients aren't allowed to demand that the building fly. They can't take delivery of your finished underground carpark and ask you to add an airport (also underground) They aren't allowed to change the law of gravity after you finish the design. Or expect the building to work on another planet. They don't blame the architect when they can't get ...


72

What are common symptoms of over-engineering? Code that solves problems you don't have.


64

I see time and time again that the marketplace does not reward software quality. Apple is a good example; for many years they had a superior product, but people would not pay. (Not just the up-front costs of Apple but also the costs to change from whatever they were using that year.) I still see many people making buying decisions on the idea that 'more ...


64

I'm including an encapsulation hierarchy table of several of the GoF design patterns to help explain the differences between these two patterns. Hopefully it better illustrates what each encapsulates so my explanation makes more sense. First off, the hierarchy lists the scope for which a given pattern is applicable, or the appropriate pattern to use to ...


62

Apple has a Technical Q&A page: QA1669 - How can I add context information - such as the current method or line number - to my logging statements? To assist with logging: The C preprocessor provides a few macros. Objective-C provides expressions (methods). Pass the implicit argument for the current method's selector: _cmd As other answers ...


59

Different people use these terms in somewhat different ways, but here's my take: 1) "Business" and "domain" are roughly synonyms. "Domain" is a bit more general in that it doesn't make the assumption that you're writing a business application. So if we were writing a scientific app or a game, we might prefer to refer to the relevant part of the code as ...


56

One major reason is that for the most part, software "engineers" aren't really trained as engineers. One of the most important principles in engineering is to keep designs as simple as possible in order to maximize reliability (fewer parts = fewer things that can fail). Most software developers that I've worked with over the years are not just unaware of ...


56

In some descriptions of the SDLC (Software Development Life Cycle) they are interchangeable, but the consesus is that they are distinct. They are at the same time: different (1) stages, (2) areas of responsibility, and (3) levels of decision-making. Architecture is the bigger picture: the choice of frameworks, languages, scope, goals, and high-level ...


55

The main problem with performance metrics like this, is that humans are VERY good at gaming any system that measures their own performance to maximize that exact performance metric - usually at the expense of something else that is valuable. Lets say we do use the hudson build to gather stats on programmer output. What could you look for, and what would be ...


50

I've come across this issue a lot of times too and ended up using interfaces. I think it's important to drop the idea that C# is any form, or even an evolution of C++. They're two different languages that share almost the same syntax. I usually express 'const correctness' in C# by defining a read-only view of a class: public interface IReadOnlyCustomer { ...


46

Rule number 1: you cannot design software without having experience on how to code software Rule number 2: you cannot design software if you never built a knowledge of typical solutions from others Rule number 3: It is difficult to design a software right the first time, even if you are an experienced designer. Some people claim it is impossible. ...


45

"Take for example a house built from scratch. Usually, the house will function as it is supposed to. It will stand for many years to come, the roof will support heavy weather conditions, the doors and the windows will do their job, the foundations will not collapse even when the house is fully populated. Sure, minor problems do occur, ...


44

I see a lot of browbeating here, but I think we should acknowledge one point: Software Development is HARD It used to be considered a truism that when IBM wrote OS/360 it was, at that point, the most logically complex system ever developed by humans. Since then we've developed techniques of handling more and more complex systems. Our languages, APIs and ...


43

For C++, the Joint Strike Fighter (F-35) C++ Coding Standard is a good read: http://www.stroustrup.com/JSF-AV-rules.pdf


41

You should do nightly builds to ensure that your codebase stays healthy. A side effect of doing nightly builds is that it forces the team to create and maintain a fully automated build script. This helps to ensure that your build process is documented and repeatable. Automated builds are good at finding the following problems: Somebody checked in ...


41

Strategies encapsulate algorithms. Commands separate the sender from the receiver of a request, they turn a request into an object. If it's an algorithm, how something will be done, use a Strategy. If you need to separate the call of a method from its execution use a Command. Commands are often used when you queue up messages for later use, like a task or ...


40

Check out Review Board (see here for a better review than I could give). Including the review in the answer: After having tried and failed to have useful code reviews at several different companies, and after feeling deep envy for Mondrian, Google’s web-based code review tool, I’d been looking for some tool that would help make code reviews ...


39

Do NOT measure the performance of each individual programmer simply using the build tool. You can measure the team as a whole, sure, or you can certainly measure the progress of each programmer, but you cannot measure their performance with such a tool. Some modules are more complicated than others, some programmers are tasked with other projects, etc. It's ...


39

For Clojure, I recommend going back to good old relational modeling. Out of the Tarpit is an inspirational read.


38

Talk about risk. That generally gets their attention. Talk about what can go wrong, and how you're going to mitigate that risk. Understandably, they're not developers so a technical explanation just won't do. This is true, just don't dumb-down your answers too much. For instance, if you're talking about the need to properly validate and ...


37

1) (...) Is this true? No it isn't, Hibernate can deal with pretty complex databases, including existing ones. However, it might not deal very well with an heavily denormalized database or an exotic schema. This is different. 2) (...) My question is how come a huge and expensive project does not care about sql optimization? This is non-sense, ...



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