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63

Learn to think functionally ( because that's where the power is ) Use the The Good Parts ( to sleep well ) Use Jslint ( to validate ) Avoid browser sniffing, and use feature detection instead ( because browsers lie ) Keep the global scope clear ( to avoid collisions ) Namespace your code ( to avoid collisions ) Don't mess with host objects ( because they ...


62

I see time and time again that the marketplace does not reward software quality. Apple is a good example; for many years they had a superior product, but people would not pay. (Not just the up-front costs of Apple but also the costs to change from whatever they were using that year.) I still see many people making buying decisions on the idea that 'more ...


59

I think code quality is too subjective to score. The way I've heard it described best is: Code is like farts. It stinks if it isn't yours. Even if you think a piece of code is great, someone else will look at it and think "This isn't very good." The qualities you described above are exactly what describes good code, but they're all subjective ...


55

One major reason is that for the most part, software "engineers" aren't really trained as engineers. One of the most important principles in engineering is to keep designs as simple as possible in order to maximize reliability (fewer parts = fewer things that can fail). Most software developers that I've worked with over the years are not just unaware of ...


50

My definition of code quality is LTFCE, based on the notion that code is literature. Over its lifetime (maintenance, reuse, etc.) the code will be read many more times than written. So, good code is (in order)... Legible - The code (the code itself, not comments) should clearly state the intent. If the reader can't make sense of the code, than all other ...


45

"Take for example a house built from scratch. Usually, the house will function as it is supposed to. It will stand for many years to come, the roof will support heavy weather conditions, the doors and the windows will do their job, the foundations will not collapse even when the house is fully populated. Sure, minor problems do occur, ...


44

I see a lot of browbeating here, but I think we should acknowledge one point: Software Development is HARD It used to be considered a truism that when IBM wrote OS/360 it was, at that point, the most logically complex system ever developed by humans. Since then we've developed techniques of handling more and more complex systems. Our languages, APIs and ...


42

If you can do code reviews -- that's a perfect place to catch it. We require reviews prior to merging to iteration trunk, so typically everything is caught then.


36

Like it or not, refactoring code smells can introduce faults in your code. I'm not at all advocating poor code, but I am saying that as developers, we must acknowledge that sometimes it is more cost effective (and therefore better for our jobs), to leave that messy code alone.


32

it works-don't touch it I refactor it if and when I have to touch it. Coding is typically like this: Refactor existing code (without changing its functionality) to ready it to accept the new code Add new code (which implements additional functionality). If there's a section of code that I merely have to read (without my even being required to prove ...


31

If you systematically perform code reviews before allowing a developer to commit the code, well, your problem is mostly solved. But this doesn't seem to be your case, so this is what I recommend: Talk to the developer. Discuss the consequences for others in the team. Most developers want to be recognized by their peer, so this might be enough. Also point ...


31

Unit testing My perception is that when I write good unit tests my code is written better. I don't always go for a full TDD approach, but by considering the code paths and the ways to test different conditions you just naturally catch silly off-by-one errors. So, devise a Unit Testing strategy, and ensure everyone uses it. Peer Reviews Great for learning ...


30

Not an automated solution, but I find WTF's per minute useful.


27

No metrics regarding coding-style are part of such a warning. For me it is about static analysis of the code, which can truly be 'on' all the time: cyclomatic complexity (detected by checkstyle) dependency cycle detection (through findbugs for instance) critical errors detected by, for instance findbugs. I would put coverage test in a second step, as ...


26

The answer is very subjective, but here is my experience. At Microsoft we have a strong test development organization. That's a little different than traditional QA because we hire programmers to test and involve them in the process as early as the design phase. Their job is to test and especially to automate the testing for the product. In my ...


25

Though I agree with the reasons given so far, there is one very simple explanation missing here that is rampant throughout the software industry: bad management. I worked as a consultant for many years, and I can't tell you how many places I've worked at where the developers were expected to finish yesterday a project they were given tomorrow. It was either ...


25

I think this article on Philip Dorrell's blog sums up one approach very well. The TLDR version is that if the code is known/proven to work, it's value far exceeds how pretty or ugly it is. If you change the code without testing it, you effectively decrease its value, even if by all visual means it appears the same. I highly recommend that blog article if ...


25

You can omit modules with the --omit flag. It takes a comma-separated list of path prefixes. So for example: coverage run my_program.py coverage report --omit=path/to/3rdparty


22

Not a comprehensive list but I can see several reasons: An unexpected microfailure in a physical system is generally not catastrophic, but it can be in a software system. A single uncaught and unhandled exception is not recoverable. It is difficult for a customer to inspect a software system; developers and product managers know this (at some level) and ...


21

Ritual beatings! For each bug, one lash of the whip! (A joke for anyone who doesn't get it)


21

Like software, a house is made of many smaller structures - bricks, doors, roof tiles and so on. Unlike software, however, each of these pieces has already been pre-made and tested long before it reaches the house. Bricks are subject to stress and pressure testing, door hinges are tested thousands of times for durability so the fact that these parts should ...


18

Read Code Complete. It's the best book I know on the subject.


17

For most projects at the company I work at the ratio is 1:1. But this can vary on several factors: Dev output. I've seen one dev who had a high amount of output and had 3 QA working on his features. Quality bar for the product. A mission critical, high reliability system should have a higher QA bar than an internal reporting website, and will need more ...


16

You create an automated test that reproduces the problem. You then fix the problem, and make sure that the new test and all your existing tests still pass. This should be regression testing, and should be automated to the extent possible.


16

You make quality software for three reasons: To be well made it must be well designed, and well designed software is faster to write. Well made software is easier to maintain, and everything gets maintained. We write well made software because we care, and because we're professionals.


16

I've dealt with this problem from time to time, and I can sympathise with your entire post. You have to be careful to pick and choose your battles with this, as you can quickly build up bad will with the people that don't agree. Here are some options: If it's just commenting or minor code-style, just leave it alone until you have to actually go back to the ...


16

Yes FxCop is a very effective tool for improving .Net code bases. In addition to finding many different types of bugs (globalization, pinvoke, security, performance) it will also warn you of various style issues that violate conventions. And point out the occasional spelling error. FxCop is highly customizable. You could for instance turn off all style ...


15

Any of the following are clear indication that your system is on the endangered species list: Single point of failure permitted to exist (only one person understands it) Resources are not allocated by management to fix defects No active development for six months No release cycle in a year Underlying vendor products/libraries go out of support Resources ...


14

As a developer who rarely tests his own code, I can tell you the one thing that's made me slowly shift my behavior... Visibility If the environment allows pushing code out, waiting for users to find problems, and then essentially asking "How about now?" after making a change to the code, there's no real incentive to test your own stuff. Code reviews and ...



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