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64

I see time and time again that the marketplace does not reward software quality. Apple is a good example; for many years they had a superior product, but people would not pay. (Not just the up-front costs of Apple but also the costs to change from whatever they were using that year.) I still see many people making buying decisions on the idea that 'more ...


56

One major reason is that for the most part, software "engineers" aren't really trained as engineers. One of the most important principles in engineering is to keep designs as simple as possible in order to maximize reliability (fewer parts = fewer things that can fail). Most software developers that I've worked with over the years are not just unaware of ...


45

"Take for example a house built from scratch. Usually, the house will function as it is supposed to. It will stand for many years to come, the roof will support heavy weather conditions, the doors and the windows will do their job, the foundations will not collapse even when the house is fully populated. Sure, minor problems do occur, like ...


44

I see a lot of browbeating here, but I think we should acknowledge one point: Software Development is HARD It used to be considered a truism that when IBM wrote OS/360 it was, at that point, the most logically complex system ever developed by humans. Since then we've developed techniques of handling more and more complex systems. Our languages, APIs and ...


42

If you can do code reviews -- that's a perfect place to catch it. We require reviews prior to merging to iteration trunk, so typically everything is caught then.


34

You can omit modules with the --omit flag. It takes a comma-separated list of path prefixes. So for example: coverage run my_program.py coverage report --omit=path/to/3rdparty


32

If you systematically perform code reviews before allowing a developer to commit the code, well, your problem is mostly solved. But this doesn't seem to be your case, so this is what I recommend: Talk to the developer. Discuss the consequences for others in the team. Most developers want to be recognized by their peer, so this might be enough. Also point ...


31

Not an automated solution, but I find WTF's per minute useful.


27

No metrics regarding coding-style are part of such a warning. For me it is about static analysis of the code, which can truly be 'on' all the time: cyclomatic complexity (detected by checkstyle) dependency cycle detection (through findbugs for instance) critical errors detected by, for instance findbugs. I would put coverage test in a second step, as ...


27

The answer is very subjective, but here is my experience. At Microsoft we have a strong test development organization. That's a little different than traditional QA because we hire programmers to test and involve them in the process as early as the design phase. Their job is to test and especially to automate the testing for the product. In my experience,...


26

Though I agree with the reasons given so far, there is one very simple explanation missing here that is rampant throughout the software industry: bad management. I worked as a consultant for many years, and I can't tell you how many places I've worked at where the developers were expected to finish yesterday a project they were given tomorrow. It was either ...


22

Not a comprehensive list but I can see several reasons: An unexpected microfailure in a physical system is generally not catastrophic, but it can be in a software system. A single uncaught and unhandled exception is not recoverable. It is difficult for a customer to inspect a software system; developers and product managers know this (at some level) and ...


21

Ritual beatings! For each bug, one lash of the whip! (A joke for anyone who doesn't get it)


21

Like software, a house is made of many smaller structures - bricks, doors, roof tiles and so on. Unlike software, however, each of these pieces has already been pre-made and tested long before it reaches the house. Bricks are subject to stress and pressure testing, door hinges are tested thousands of times for durability so the fact that these parts should ...


18

For most projects at the company I work at the ratio is 1:1. But this can vary on several factors: Dev output. I've seen one dev who had a high amount of output and had 3 QA working on his features. Quality bar for the product. A mission critical, high reliability system should have a higher QA bar than an internal reporting website, and will need more ...


16

Any of the following are clear indication that your system is on the endangered species list: Single point of failure permitted to exist (only one person understands it) Resources are not allocated by management to fix defects No active development for six months No release cycle in a year Underlying vendor products/libraries go out of support Resources ...


16

You create an automated test that reproduces the problem. You then fix the problem, and make sure that the new test and all your existing tests still pass. This should be regression testing, and should be automated to the extent possible.


15

You make quality software for three reasons: To be well made it must be well designed, and well designed software is faster to write. Well made software is easier to maintain, and everything gets maintained. We write well made software because we care, and because we're professionals.


15

The Incredible Rate of Diminishing Returns of Fixing Software Bugs (Stefan Priebsh: OOP and Design Patterns: Codeworks DC in September 2009)


14

As a developer who rarely tests his own code, I can tell you the one thing that's made me slowly shift my behavior... Visibility If the environment allows pushing code out, waiting for users to find problems, and then essentially asking "How about now?" after making a change to the code, there's no real incentive to test your own stuff. Code reviews and ...


14

Check out this related question. A lot of responders here are blaming these defects on unskilled software developers. I think the problem is far deeper and more interesting than that. A great deal of software comes out of engineering institutions who hire solid people and put enormous energy into getting things right. There are QA departments, ...


13

A lot of high-falutin' ideas here, but I think the answer is very simple. I'm not trolling, but the fact that most software engineers a. suck and b. have absolutely no desire whatsoever to develop themselves has everything to do with this. The 9-5'ers, especially in internal software (I work in internal software myself so... :-) just have absolutely no idea ...


13

Well, the short answer is "no." Robust can mean a lot of things, but the best definition I can come up with is "performing correctly in every situation." If you send a bad HTTP header to a robust web server, it shouldn't crash. It should return exactly the right kind of error, and it should log the event somewhere, perhaps in a configurable way. If a ...


13

I have found JMeter to work fine, but I generally use is across 4-5 PC's to get the most accurate results. Although you may believe 120 concurrent users may be difficult to simulate from a single PC, you have to realise that in a real work scenario, 120 simultaneous users will not be accessing the server at exactly the same time, therefore the CPU threading ...


12

Number of warnings the compiler spits out when I do a build.


12

Number of commented out lines per line of production code. Generally it indicates a sloppy programmer that doesn't understand version control.


12

I think the problem is inherently human. Human brains haven’t developed to cope well with this high degree of abstraction required in software development. Our ancestors had to face tigers in the savanna. Natural selection dictates that they evolved by adapting to this situation. Most animals, even “intelligent” ones, fail at the most simple tasts that ...


12

It's a good idea to see the coverage of your tests as it can point to problems. If your test code isn't being run then there wasn't much point in writing it! The one I always get is when I give two unit test functions the same name - I add a new test several months after the original and just happen to pick the same name. The unittest framework won't ...


11

As others have pointed out, there are plenty of badly built houses, houses that are so infected with fungi after a single year that it's a hazard to your health to live there, houses where the rain leaks in through the roof, houses that collapse in windy weather and houses that fail in countless of other ways. And not just that, there are also countless of ...


11

Someone mentioned some compiler switches, but having syntactically smooth code is not going to ensure a quality end-product, because there's more to software quality than that. There are several classifications of software qualities, but here's a list that you can use as a checklist: Correctness (does it work according to spec?) Reliability (can de user ...



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