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11

Is the single header included in multiple source files? If so, you need to wrap it in "include guards" like so: #ifndef TAUCS_H #define TAUCS_H //Header stuff here #endif //TAUCS_H


11

There isn't a simple way to do this in C but I think muParser may be useful to you, it is written in C++ but has C binding. ExprTk is also an option but looks like it is C++ only, on the plus side it looks much easier to get interesting results with. Another option may be the Expression Evaluation which is part of Libav. It is in C and the eval.h header has ...


9

The Russel & Norvig book is an excellent reference on these algorithms, and I'll give larsmans a virtual high-five for suggesting it; however I disagree that IDA* is in any appreciable way harder to program than A*. I've done it for a project where I had to write an AI to solve a sliding-block puzzle - the familiar problem of having a N x N grid of ...


7

(I don't know why you mention scipy in your question when you use sympy in your code. I'll assume you are using sympy.) Sympy can solve this equation if you specify an integer power for y (ie y**3.0 changed to y**3). The following works for me using Sympy 0.6.7. from sympy import Eq, Symbol, solve y = Symbol('y') eqn = Eq(y*(8.0 - y**3), 8.0) print ...


7

Minimizing x1 + x2 + ... where the xi satisfy linear constraints is called Linear Programming. It's covered in some detail in Wikipedia


7

Finding roots of polynomials is difficult and tricky. Getting a stable robust algorithm will get you headache. Newton + root removal seems a great idea, but making this work correctly is really painful. One obvious problem is the stability of the root removal. One other problem is complex roots. One more difficult problem is (numerically) multiple roots, ...


7

This is a non-polynomial equation, and it will probably fallback to a numeric solver (non-symbolic). So there might be numerical errors, or the numeric algorithm might get stuck and report false solutions, I'm not sure... What you can do is substitute the solutions back into the equation, and reject ones that are above some specified threshold: % define ...


6

Use lp in the lpSolve package to solve the underlying integer programming problem. The first 5 constraints are on the number of A, B, C, D and E positions respectively, the 6th is on the number of staff to choose and the 7th is on the total salary. Assuming DF is the data frame shown in the question try this: library(lpSolve) obj <- DF$Prod con <- ...


6

You can use Model.Power method. Math.Pow is for doubles only. error1 = Model.Power(error1, 2); error2 = Model.Power(error2, 2);


6

I've just installed VS 2012 on my computer. I also have VS 2010 installed. I've re-installed Solver Foundation, but still no such project type in VS 2012 (unlike VS 2010). I would also like to know how to add this project type to the templates in VS 2012. However, this might help you: it is enough to add the reference in your project to the ...


6

Using solve with a single parameter is a request to invert a matrix. The error message is telling you that your matrix is singular and cannot be inverted.


6

I built a sudoku game a while ago and used the dancing links algorithm by Donald Knuth to generate the puzzles. I found these sites very helpful in learning and implementing the algorithm http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dancing_Links http://cgi.cse.unsw.edu.au/~xche635/dlx_sodoku/ http://garethrees.org/2007/06/10/zendoku-generation/


6

By far the easiest way would be to use nine 3x3 JPanels of JLabels nested into one large 3x3 JPanel of JPanels. Then you could just apply special borders to the small 3x3s.


6

I would try either GLPK or SCIP. They have their own modeling language, GLPK has GNU MathProg and SCIP has ZIMPL, so you can conveniently code your LP problem. GNU MathProg has the advantage of being compatible with AMPL. Thus, you could try the student version of AMPL with CPLEX or Gurobi with your GNU MathProg model. Keep in mind that AMPL, CPLEX and ...


6

The solver is essentially an iterative technique used to find roots of functions. Depending on the particular form of the function that you are trying to find a root of, you can roll your own or use existing implementations of the bisection method or Newton's method (or many other iterative root-finding techniques). If you post more about the specific ...


6

On this year's PyCon Raymond Hettinger talked about AI programing in Python, and has covered Cryptarithms. The video of entire talk can be seen here, and cookbook with solution can be found on this link.


6

I've used this Math Expression Parsing library with positive results. The documentation he's provided was very useful to boot. http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/MathieuMathParser.aspx?display=Print Your app can then accommodate ad hoc equations which the library will parse into component parts. You can then provide the values for required variables ...


5

If the binary values are far from 0 or 1, you might have to go to options in the Solver window and check if the box "Ignore integer constraints is checked".


5

What you have there is a pretty basic Linear Programming problem. You want to maximize the equation X_1 + ... + X_n subject to X_1 >= 2 X_2 + X_3 >= 13 etc. There are numerous algorithms to solve this type of problem. The most well known is the Simplex algorithm which will solve your equation (with certain caveats) quite efficiently in the ...


5

No, but you can get a wordlist from various places. From there, you could read the wordlist file into a list: List<String> lines = new ArrayList<String>(); BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("wordlist.txt")); String line = null; while (null!=(line=in.readLine())) { lines.add(line); } in.close(); And finally binary search ...


5

with @ALi's literature reference help: set seasons; set months; set monthsOfseason {seasons} within months; data; set seasons := winter spring summer fall; set months := jan feb mar apr may jun jul aug sep oct nov dec; set monthsOfseason[winter] := dec jan feb; set monthsOfseason[spring] := mar apr may; set monthsOfseason[summer] := jun jul aug; set ...


5

Use flood fill. It is the algorithm that MS uses in theirs. Change maybe to an array that stores the cell values without using string. enum CellType { Bomb, Flag, Hidden, Empty } CellType[,] cells = new CellType[10,10]; Basically when someone clicks on a cell check to see if it hidden, check to see if the cells around it are hidden. ...


5

If there are a finite number of solutions, you can use the disjunct of the constants (your x_i's) not equal to their assigned model values to enumerate all of them. If there are infinite solutions (which is the case if you want to prove this for all natural numbers n), you can use the same technique, but of course couldn't enumerate them all, but could use ...


5

Well you need to set it like this sin(z) - 2 = 0 So like this: >>> from sympy.solvers import solve >>> from sympy import * >>> z = Symbol('z') >>> solve(sin(z) - 2, z) [pi - asin(2), asin(2)] >>> asin(2).evalf() 1.5707963267949 - 1.31695789692482*I


5

The default simplifier seeks only rewrites that are cheap. There is a different simplifier that you can invoke as a tactic. It simplifies the goals you describe. For example: (declare-const a Bool) (declare-const b Bool) (assert (or a (and a b))) (apply ctx-solver-simplify) It may return several subgoal that need to be re-assembled to a formula. The Z3 ...


5

(Note: no new releases of Solver Foundation are forthcoming - it's essentially been dropped by Microsoft.) The stack trace indicates that this is a bug in the simplex solver's presolve routine. Unfortunately the SimplexDirective does not have a way to disable presolve (unlike InteriorPointDirective). Therefore the way to get around this problem is to ...


4

If you prefer the log format, use .rewrite(log), like In [4]: asin(2).rewrite(log) Out[4]: ⎛ ___ ⎞ -ⅈ⋅log⎝╲╱ 3 ⋅ⅈ + 2⋅ⅈ⎠ Combining this with Games's answer, you can get: In [3]: sols = solve(sin(z) - 2, z) In [4]: sols Out[4]: [π - asin(2), asin(2)] In [5]: [i.rewrite(log) for i in sols] Out[5]: ⎡ ⎛ ___ ⎞ ⎛ ___ ...


4

You can also try this: http://formal.cs.utah.edu:8080/pbl/BDD.php It is the best tool for BDDs I used so far.


4

Personally, I just tend to just use: apply (metis thm) which works most of the time without forcing me to think very hard (but will still occasionally fail if tricky resolution is required). Other methods that will also typically work include: apply (rule thm) (* If "thm" has no premises. *) apply (erule thm) (* If "thm" ...



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