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1

Here is a solution - Implement bubble sort with loops and bitwise operations. std::string unsorted = "37980965"; for(int i = 1; i < unsorted.size(); ++i) for(int j = 0; j < i; ++j) { auto &a = unsorted[i]; auto &b = unsorted[j]; (((a) >= (b)) || (((a) ^= (b)), ((b) ^= (a)), ((a) ^= (b)))); } std::cout ...


1

Quick sort and bubble sort are general purpose algorithms. As such the do not make any assumption on the data to be sorted. However, whenever we have additional information on the data we can use this to get something different (I do not say better/faster or anything like this because it is really hard to be better than something as simple and powerful as ...


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Does this do what you want? //var inboxMessages = {... your input ...}; function convertToOrderedArrays() { var output = []; var thread_ids = Object.keys(inboxMessages); var threadObject, threadArray, keys; for (var ii=0, thread_id; thread_id=thread_ids[ii]; ii++) { threadObject = inboxMessages[thread_id]; keys = Object.keys(threadObject); ...


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It's important to note that Lauritz's suggestion idea of using bisect does not actually find the closest value in MyList to MyNumber. Instead, bisect finds the next value in order after MyNumber in MyList. So in OP's case you'd actually get the position of 44 returned instead of the position of 4. >>> myList = [1, 3, 4, 44, 88] >>> ...


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The answer is listed in Matlab's help page for 'sort'. You can output the sorting indices for A and apply it for B. SO: [A1, ind]=sort(A); B1=B(ind);


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Try: [A1, I] = sort(A); B1 = B(I);


1

While the data to be sorted could be moved into the sort function, doing so creates a function that's pretty much useless--since it only ever sorts one set of data, it's equivalent to return {1, 2, 3, 4 5, 6, 7, 8}; Your insertion sort is also a bit of a mess. Pseudo-code for an insertion sort normally looks something like this: for i in 1 to size do ...


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I would suggest that you do not do this. A function is supposed to be a reusable piece of code. If you hardcode the array into the function then that function could only ever sort the array that is in the function and you would have to edit the array in the function to sort something different. By passing the array to the function now you have the ability ...


2

foreach works on a copy of the array. To modify the actual array you need to reference the value (notice the &): foreach( $my_arr as &$arr ) { Or you should be able to use the key and the actual array $my_arr[$key]: foreach( $my_arr as $key => $arr ) { if( count( $arr ) > 1 ) { usort( $my_arr[$key], function( $a, $b ) { ...


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Your Question is too broad , however If the input array is already sorted, insertion sort performs as few as n-1 comparisons thats make insertion sort more efficient you may find this paper helpful Best sorting algorithm for nearly sorted lists


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Insertion Sort has linear performance when list is almost sorted. Check : http://www.sorting-algorithms.com/nearly-sorted-initial-order Insertion places an element at correct position considering the relative ordering hence need n - 1 iterations. Other sorts like quick sort again tries to sort a sorted segment again as it is unaware of relative ordering ...


1

You just need to specify a predicate: vector<vector<int>> vecs; vecs.push_back(vector<int>(4)); vecs.push_back(vector<int>(2)); vecs.push_back(vector<int>(1)); vecs.push_back(vector<int>(3)); std::sort(vecs.begin(), vecs.end(), [](const vector<int> & a, const vector<int> & b){ return a.size() < ...


0

Here's one way to do it. My perms function generates all valid permutations. First I collect the indexes for each element in B, then I recursively build and yield the permutations by always picking one of the still available indexes for each item in A until a permutation is ready to be yielded. from collections import defaultdict def perms(A, B): ...


0

You could do this in three steps. First, create a dictionary from list B that has items as keys and indexes as values. In your case, the dictionary for your list B: B = [7, 'x', 'x'] 7 - [0] 'x' - [1, 2] Then, go through your list A and build an index that maps List A indexes to their corresponding List B indexes. That is: A = ['x', 'x', 7] 0 - [1, ...


1

I suspect this will be fastest: $ tr ' ' '\n' < file | sort -rn | head -1 42342234 Third run: $ time tr ' ' '\n' < file | sort -rn | head -1 42342234 real 0m0.078s user 0m0.000s sys 0m0.076s btw DON'T WRITE SHELL LOOPS to manipulate text, even if it's creating sample input files: $ time awk -v s="$(cat a)" 'BEGIN{for ...


2

I'm surprised by awk's speed here. perl is usually pretty speedy, but: $ for ((i=0; i<1000000; i++)); do echo $RANDOM; done > rand $ time awk 'NR==1 || max < 0+$0 {max=0+$0} END {print max}' RS='[[:space:]]+' rand 32767 real 0m0.890s user 0m0.887s sys 0m0.003s $ time perl -MList::Util=max -lane '$m = max $m, map {0+$_} @F} END {print $max' ...


2

You should decompose your problem in two : first find a particular permutation sigma_0 that maps B onto A find the set S_B of all the permutations that map B onto itself Then the set you are looking after is just {sigma_0 \circ \sigma, sigma \in S_B}. Now the question becomes : how to we determine S_B ? To do this, you can just observe that if you ...


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code will be something like this (didn't executed) $('.someiconclass').click(function(){ // sort first var lnames = []; $('.row').each(function(){ lnames.push[$(this).find('.employe-name').html().split(',')[0]]; }); lnames.sort(); // arrange accordingly var alldivs = $('#parentId').clone(true); ...


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You can make final Comparator<Persona> comparator = nullsFirst(comparing(Persona::getName));


1

The first sorting field is completed ASC-ending, of course. For the second field you can use an expression that makes the values of delivered to be sorted as desired. Assuming the type of column delivered is DATE or DATETIME, UNIX_TIMESTAMP(delivered) is a number. For completed = '0' use UNIX_TIMESTAMP(delivered) in the ascending order. For completed ...


4

This could be done using case-when in the order by clause as SELECT * FROM users order by case when completed='0' then delivery end, case when completed='1' then delivery end desc; If you need to send all completed='0' on the top assuming there is no null values then you can do as order by completed, case when completed='0' then delivery end, ...


3

In awk you can say: awk '{for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)if(int($i)){a[$i]=$i}}END{x=asort(a);print a[x]}' file Explanation In my experience awk is the fastest text processing language for most tasks and the only thing i have seen of comparable speed (on linux systems) are programs written in c/c++. In the code above using minimal functions and commands will ...


2

I'm sure a C implementation optimized using assembler will be the fastest. Also I could think of a program which separates the file into multiple chunks and maps every chunk onto a single processor core, and afterwards just get's the maximum of nproc remaning numbers. Just using the existing command line tools, have you tried awk? awk '{m=(m<$0 ...


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Using the good technique from SQL var orderedList = aListOfPeople.OrderBy(x => x.Age).ThenBy(x => Guid.NewGuid());


0

You can see guid for filters So in your case depends from defininition .filter('translate', you can use it like .controller('StringsController', function(blabla, $filter) { //simple transtale var translatedString = $filter('translate')(stringForTranslate); //ordering var ordered = $filter('orderBy')(arrayForOrdering,function(el){ return ...


0

You need to keep the players in memory in some kind of data structure, e.g. a list. Once you have a list containing the things you want to sort, then you can use sorted() to alphabetize it, and then use the sorted list to write all of the players to a file in order.


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The simplest answer is to shuffle and then sort. If you use a stable sort then the sort must preserve the shuffled order for equal-keyed values. However, even though an unstable sort will perturb your shuffle I can't think of any reasonable case in which it could un-shuffle equal-keyed values. That might be a little inefficient, though... If you're ...


1

As Chris Gerken said You need to override this method while extending WritableComparator or implement RawComparator instead of WritableComparator. public int compare(byte[] b1, int s1, int l1, byte[] b2, int s2, int l2) { return 0; } and as you said you wanted to see no sorting to be done but if you return 0 that means every time MapReduce tries to ...


1

You need to implement/override this method, too: public int compare(byte[] b1, int s1, int l1, byte[] b2, int s2, int l2) { // per your desired no-sort logic return 0; } I think that your comparator is being constructed in such a way that the variables mentioned in the super implementation are null (and this is the method that's being called in ...


1

Probably too c-ish, but here is an alternative to the already posted examples. var a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] var b = [[Int]]() func perms<T>(n: Int, inout a: [T], inout b: [[T]]) { if n == 0 { b.append(a) } else { for i in 0..<n { perms(n - 1, &a, &b) var j = 0 if n % 2 == 0 { ...


0

You can get it done with this simple awk command: awk 'a[$0]{print;next}{a[$0]=1}' sample.txt Here, $0 => the current complete line being processed. if a[$0] is already set, print the line (this is a duplicate line) and proceed to next line. Else a[$0] is set, so next time the same line (if present) will be taken as duplicate. Example: AMD$ cat ...


1

https://gist.github.com/JadenGeller/5d49e46d4084fc493e72 He created structs to handle permutations: var greetingPermutations = PermutationSequenceGenerator(elements: ["hi", "hey", "hello"]) while let greetingSequence = greetingPermutations.next(){ for greeting in greetingSequence { print("\(greeting) ") } println() } or: var numberSpace = ...


0

Here a prototype is used, which inserts an array into an array after a specific digit: Array.prototype.insertIntoArr = function(insert, digit) { var i = this.indexOf(digit) + 1; return this.slice(0, i).concat(insert).concat(this.slice(i)); } The function moveAfter( ... ) first cleans the array from the values of toMove. Second toMove is inserted ...


0

Code: import java.util.Arrays; public class SelectiveSort { public static void main(String[] args) { Item [] items = new Item [6]; items[0] = new Item(2, true); items[1] = new Item(5, false); items[2] = new Item(3, false); items[3] = new Item(1, true); items[4] = new Item(6, true); items[5] = ...


0

(To expand on my comment: You need a basic "thing": class Thing { boolean newAvailable; int order; public Thing(boolean newAvailable, int order) { ... } } ...and a Comparable... class CompareThings implements Comparator<Thing> { ... int compare(Thing t1, Thing t2) { if (t1.newAvailable!=t2.newAvailable) ...


0

Something like this? var a = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]; var b = move_after(1, [4, 5, 7]); var c = move_after(9, [0, 5]); console.log(a); console.log(b); console.log(c); function move_after(moveAfter, toMove) { var arr = a.reduce(function (c, e, i) { if (toMove.indexOf(e) === -1) { c.push(e); } return c; }, ...


0

Generally, this sort of problem is solved by fitting the data to an expected function (such as t = cn + b, or t = cnlogn + b) using a least-squares method. Assuming that the "c" you are requesting is the constant factor in front of the main term of your runtime, you will get c with that method. The value of c will of course be dependent on the particular ...


0

Try this: move_after = function (after, move_array) { var i, s; s = []; for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) { // only append "i" it if is NOT in move_array if (move_array.indexOf(i) === -1) s.push(i); if (i == after) s.push(move_array); } return s; };


0

Using your idea function move_after(orig_array, after, move_array) { //remove elements from the array move_array.forEach(function(element) { var index = operations.indexOf(element); orig_array.splice(index, 1); }); var after_index = ...


0

What about something like this: http://plnkr.co/edit/k2h6BWTUCFj5BS4oFF8C (function(){ var arr = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]; var userArr = [4,5,7]; var temp = []; var pos = 1; for(var i = arr.length; i >= 0; i--){ if(userArr.indexOf(arr[i]) !== -1){ temp.push(arr[i]); arr.splice(i, 1); } } for(var i = 0; i < temp.length; ...


0

I solved it. Inside the sorting code, I added print ('-'*20 + '', 'Top Twenty Values', '' + '-'*20 ) print ('Value [count]') for val, cnt in counts.most_common(20): print ('%s [%s]' % (val, cnt)) with open('test.csv', 'a') as f: writer = csv.writer(f, delimiter=',', lineterminator='\n') writer.writerow([val])


0

This is the best sort-of-answer I've found so far: https://github.com/joyent/node/issues/7676 TL;DR v8 doesn't concern itself with supporting localeCompare fully, but chrome uses v8-i18n to support this. Node is in the process of figuring out how to incorporate full support into Node.


3

You can simply use indexing for that : >>> import numpy as np >>> values = np.array([10.0, 30.1, 50, 40, 20]) >>> order=[0, 3, 1, 4, 2] >>> sorted_array=values[order] >>> sorted_array array([ 10. , 40. , 30.1, 20. , 50. ]) Also as @Divakar mentioned in comment if you want the following condition : ...


2

You can use hash as a list, convert it to k/v aref pairs, perform sort on values (second element), and pick keys from sorted list (roughly it is Schwartzian transform in disguise). use strict; use warnings; use List::Util 'pairs'; my %h = ("1010" => 1, "1110" => 0, "0001" => 3, "1100" => 2); my @k = map $_->[0], sort { $b->[1] ...


2

So you want to have a generic sorting function such as my $sorter = sub { $_[0]{$b} <=> $_[0]{$a} }; When it comes time to sort, just use my @sorted_keys = sort { $sorter->(\%h) } keys(%h);


2

You can simply use FIND_IN_SET and GROUP_CONCAT , see query below I've tested SELECT listing_id, group_concat(Category.category_name) FROM `listings` Listing LEFT JOIN `categories` Category ON FIND_IN_SET(Category.id, Listing.category_id) group by Listing.listing_id Try below code in PHP <?php $servername = "localhost"; $username = "root"; $password = ...


0

The answer given by NINCOMPOOP can be made simpler using Lambda Expressions: Collections.sort(recipes, (Recipe r1, Recipe r2) -> r1.getID().compareTo(r2.getID()));


0

You need to sort your SQL Query on the keys and you can use this custom function I wrote a while back /** * Converts an mysql result query to a associative subarray * @param $arr the array container a sql result set, make sure that it is sorted * on FIXED keys , so f.e (a1;b1;b3),(a1;b2;b4),(a2;b1;b3) */ ...


1

You are sorting strings, you need to use float(x[3]) sort=sorted(csv1,key=lambda x:float(x[3])) If you want to sort by the third column it is x[2], casting to int: sort=sorted(csv1,key=lambda x:int(x[2])) You will also need to skip the header to avoid a ValueError: csv1 = csv.reader(sample,delimiter=',') header = next(csv1) sort=sorted(csv1,key=lambda ...


0

You can achieve this using JQuery. Here is a plug-in for client-side sorting tables with links outside the table: http://tablesorter.com/docs/ Example usage: http://tablesorter.com/docs/example-trigger-sort.html



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