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14

Follow this procedure to convert spaces to tabs or vice-versa:


10

By not using print plus a comma; the comma will insert a space instead of a newline in this case. Use sys.stdout.write() to get more control: import sys def square(n): for i in range(n): for j in range(n): if i==0 or j==0 or i==n-1 or j==n-1: sys.stdout.write("*") else: sys.stdout.write("+") print print just ...


8

If you have a vimrc in your profile you can add this line to prevent vim from changing to spaces: autocmd FileType make setlocal noexpandtab I too was struggling with this, and this fixed it for me. Spread the good word!


7

This code will check if the string only contains numbers and space character. if re.match("^[0-9 ]+$", myString): print "Only numbers and Spaces"


6

A simple solution would be to do something like: :match Error /\t/ :2match Todo / / Where Error and Todo are highlight groups from :highlight. This is going to take up two of your three matches and will only be temporary. Theoretically you could use matchadd() or a combination of highlight groups and :syntax match commands in your .vimrc to make this ...


6

Putting multiple arguments into a single variable doesn't make sense. Instead, put them into an array: args=(combined.pdf "my file.pdf"); Notice that "my file.pdf" is quoted to preserve whitespace. You can use the array like this: pdftk "${args[@]}" ... This will pass two separate arguments to pdftk. The quotes in "${args[@]}" are required because ...


5

You should use nextLine() method instead of next(): inputString = keyboard.nextLine(); Scanner#next() method reads the next token. Tokens are considered to be separated by a delimiter. And the default delimiter of Scanner is as recognized by Character.isWhitespace.


5

In your first example if(c != ' ') putchar(c); lastspace = 0; doesn't place {} braces after the if statement so only the immediate following statement is executed conditionally. Changing indentation and adding braces shows that the code is actually if(c != ' ') { putchar(c); } lastspace = 0; This is the reason why some coding standards ...


5

You can do this for example, using XML package: tt <- '<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <item id="rt" name ="th"> <point1>1254</point1> <point2>1254</point2> </item> ' library(XML) xpathSApply(doc,'//item',xmlGetAttr,'id') [1] "rt" EDIT In case your data is not well formatted, you should reformat ...


5

To have 4-space tabs in most files, real 8-wide tab char in Makefiles, and automatic indenting in various files including C/C++, put this in your ~/.vimrc file: " Only do this part when compiled with support for autocommands. if has("autocmd") " Use filetype detection and file-based automatic indenting. filetype plugin indent on " Use actual ...


5

I would do add_spaces(char *dest, int num_of_spaces) { int len = strlen(dest); memset( dest+len, ' ', num_of_spaces ); dest[len + num_of_spaces] = '\0'; } But as @self stated, a function that also gets the maximum size of dest (including the '\0' in that example) is safer: add_spaces(char *dest, int size, int num_of_spaces) { int len = ...


4

From analyzing the rep function, this is what it appears to be doing. First, it takes the length of the match string passed in and make it negative (eg like multiplying it by -1). In the while loop it keeps adding to space until it becomes positive. It might be easier to visualize this using a number line: ...


4

In vim's insert mode, one can use Ctrl-v <TAB> to insert a literal tab, even if you have set the tab key to insert spaces. This doesn't answer your question, of course, but might be an alternative to the methods available to avoid needing literal tabs.


4

git apply --whitespace=fix appears to make that happen during rebase. Maybe set [apply] whitespace = warn in your gitconfig and see if it resolves your issue. See also the "core.whitespace" setting for more.


4

It's more simple than you think: print "%-15s %-15s %-15s %-15s" % (dev, size, calc, stat) The 15 says "This string needs to be 15 characters wide in the output." - says: "Pad it on the right with spaces if necessary." Without the -, the values would be padded on the left.


4

I would use str.ljust for this: print "".join(map(lambda s: s.ljust(15), (dev, size, calc, stat))) The advantage of this is that the column width is now only in one place (although this may not be an advantage if you later decide they should be different widths!)


4

You could also use format like this as well print "{1: <{0}}{2: <{0}}{3: <{0}}{4}".format(15, dev, size, calc, stat)


4

The substring http://not is a valid URL. If you want to check that a given string is an URL (not: that it merely contains an URL), you must anchor the match: /\A$RE{URI}{HTTP}\z/


4

Strings in .NET are immutable. Calling nums[i].ToString() gives you a new string, without modifying nums. Replace is the way to go, but you have to assign result back to nums: string nums = "1 2 3 4 5"; nums = nums.Replace(" ", ""); It's necessary, because Replace does not modify source string. It returns new one instead.


4

You could do it using .gitattributes, see the smudge/clean concept in the git book. You can create filters that convert the files on commit and checkout. In .gitattributes, configure what files should be affected by your filter * filter=spacetabs On command line, tell what scripts should be run for filtering the files: $ git config --global ...


3

Try as if($.trim($("#lname").val())=="") Full Code if($.trim($("#fname").val())=="") { $("#fname").addClass('errorClass'); $("#fname").focus(); flag = 1; } else{ $("#fname").removeClass('errorClass'); } if($.trim($("#lname").val())=="") { $("#lname").addClass('errorClass'); $("#lname").focus(); flag = 1; } else{ ...


3

You can press Tab just after typing fi, with cursor still at the end of line. It should fix the indentation of the current line. So, learn to press Tab at the end of each line, not at the beginning.


3

Simple solution: argparse considers a space filled string as a single argument if it is encapsulated by quotation marks. This input worked and "solved" the problem: -d "C:\SMTHNG\Name with spaces\MORE\file.csv" NOTICE: argument has "" around it.


3

VBScript's Trim removes spaces/blanks, not other kinds of whitespace. You'll need a RegExp to clean strings with leading/trailing vbTab, vbCrLf, ... which you often get, when you process the output of .Run or. Exec. Demo snippet: >> s1 = "abc" & vbCrLf & " " >> s2 = "abc" >> WScript.Echo Len(s1), Len(s2) >> set r = New ...


3

I got around this with wildcards: export PRO="/cygdrive/d/Program*Files/"


3

You can also use parentheses to make sure unwanted space is not included in the output: (echo test) >foo.txt


3

Most likely what you're trying to do is impossible to do perfectly, and very hard to do well enough to satisfy you. I'll explain below. But there's a good chance you shouldn't be doing it in the first place. pdfminer is highly configurable, and something like just specifying a smaller -M value will give you the text you wanted in the first place. You'll ...


3

Use quotes: @echo off set text=Hello :start cls echo %text% set /p input=: if "%input%"=="a b" set text=It worked goto start It will also handle null input. Mona


3

The \t and \n are the tab and new-line escape sequences respectively, so change printf("%d\t", c); to printf("%d", c); to get rid of the tab, and remove printf("\n"); all together, to loose the new lines... easy As an asside: why are you declaring a second int c? Your code starts with declaring bunch of ints, some of which you don't use: int i, ...


3

It looks more like the problem is with the quotation marks in the string literal. Try replacing each quote with two sets: @"Provider=Microsoft.ACE.OLEDB.12.0;Data Source=""\\na1b\uj\UP647529\Year 2\Managing Data and Security\Employee.accdb"""; Alternatively, you can ditch the literal and use escape characters: "Provider=Microsoft.ACE.OLEDB.12.0;Data ...



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