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30

Let your compiler figure it out! Seriously, if you're really concerned about optimizations at this level (and you shouldn't be unless it shows up in a profile), you should get used to looking at your compiler's assembly language output. You will be amazed what the compiler is doing on your behalf. All the people who are recommending math tricks either ...


23

Division is not an expensive operation. I doubt very much if a divide-by-1000000 operation will be anywhere near the main bottleneck in your application. Floating-point processors will be way faster than any sort of "tricks" you can come up with than just doing the single operation.


11

The line: cond = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char)); allocates exactly one char for storage, into which you are then copying more than one - strcpy needs to put, at a bare minimum, the null terminator but, in your case, also the results of your strtok as well. The reason it may work on a different system is that some implementations of malloc will allocate at ...


10

I'm surprised nobody has gotten this yet… division is the same as multiplication by a fraction multiplying by a fractional power of 2 is fast: just bit-shift integral division involves rounding down rounding down is like multiplying by a slightly smaller fraction (up to a certain point, you need to be aware of your ranges) So, const uint64_t numerator = ...


9

I recommend simply replacing the sleep 1 calls with select(undef, undef, undef, 1) and avoiding the whole issue. From the symptoms you give, I'd wager that your chroot'd perl script is implementing sleep in terms of SIGALRM (as is permitted by POSIX), and that for some reason perl is not catching that signal as it should, perhaps because it isn't expecting ...


8

They're few and far between for free, I would suggest trying to get a hold of (cheap, second-hand) Richard Paul's book called "SPARC Architecture Assembly Language Programming and C", ISBN 0138768897. It's well worth the money and available on Amazon, for one. The only online stuff I've seen is through www.sparc.com but I seem to recall that they require ...


6

Last time I was working on a Solaris codebase, I used Visual Studio. Yes, the Microsoft product. Modern versions of Both Visual Studio and Sun Studio are fairly standards compliant. As a result, I could debug application logic on Windows. For the low-level stuff we relied on Qt. As a bonus, once you've got the port to x86-64/Win done, supporting ...


6

Run java -d64 -version. It will complain if a 64 bit JVM isn't installed.


6

As described here: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-4.1.2/gcc/Atomic-Builtins.html __sync_val_compare_and_swap on some targets will result in a function call (where direct code generation is not available or not yet implemented). That is happening in your case. Assuming that itself is not a problem for you, you then need to link the library which defines ...


5

cmpxchgb is a i386 instruction, it won't work under Sparc.


5

pfff... finally. #define BUFSIZE 464 #define DUFSIZE 256 I thought the offset was 8, but it's 200 + 8.


5

SPARC is an architecture, not a language — it is, specifically, the architecture used by Sun Microsystems' high-performance server CPUs. Because it is a fundamentally different architecture from those used by Intel, et al. (e.g., x86), it has a different instruction set, and as such, a different assembly language. Different architectures are better at doing ...


5

If you cast an 8 bit array type to short (16 bit) on a little endian platform, you'll get a different result than what you get on a big endian platform when doing the same. The compiler can't help you with that, since that is just the nature of endianess...


4

Change that to long long unsigned ll = 0x123456789ULL; // notice the suffix Without the suffix, the literal is bigger than the maximum unsigned long value on your machine, and that, according to C++03 (but not C++11, which has long long), is undefined behavior. This means that anything can happen, including a compile-time error. It's also worth nothing ...


4

This would seem to be the a logical conclusion for superscalor CPUs with multiple load-store units too. Multi-channel memory controllers are pretty common these days. In the case of out-of-order instruction execution, an enormous amount of logic is expended in determining whether instructions have dependancies on others in the stream - not just register ...


4

Answer to your question depends on the memory ordering model of your CPU, which is not the same as the CPU allowing out of order execution. If the CPU implements Total store ordering (eg x86 or Sparc) then the answer to your question is 0x42 will not be loaded before 0x1337 If the cpu implements a relaxed memory model (eg IA-64, PowerPC, alpha), then in the ...


4

1.- Make sure gcc is installed install gcc if needed # pkg search gcc # pkg install pkg:/developer/gcc-45@4.5.2-0.175.1.0.0.24.0 2.- Make sure yams is installed install yams if needed download from http://www.tortall.net/projects/yasm/releases/yasm-1.2.0.tar.gz unzip, untar in local dir #./configure #make install add the path # PATH=$PATH:/usr/local/bin ...


4

According to the SPARC Architecture Manual, page 116, it's an implementation option whether or not to set %y in sdiv. Apparently, it's also an implementation option whether to implement it in hardware or software, so it seems that some software implementations don't set %y.


4

SimICS emulates a Sparc platform. Academic and personal licenses are free. Edit: I didn't do SimICS justice in my initial response, it is a very useful tool for Sparc-based development. You can instrument, profile, and explore the behavior or code in both user space and kernel space. I first became aware of it about 10 years ago, when it was released by the ...


4

Here are some results based on test clients calling a couple of our web services running on Tomcat 5.5 on Solaris using the 64-bit and 32-bit versions of JDK 1.6.0_13. The 64-bit JVM resulted in a performance hit of about 7% when using the default settings on Tomcat 5.5. When I doubled the Tomcat parameters acceptCount and maxThreads to 1000 each the ...


4

Most often, when using a dynamic library, the nm utility will not be able to give you the exact answer. Binaries these days use what is known as relocatable addresses. These addresses change when they are mapped to the process' address space. Using the Xlinker -M option, I am able to get a large memory map with a lot of things I don't recognize. The ...


4

The lib/ ones are 32-bit images, the sparcv9/ ones are 64-bit. Try file * on each set.


4

The compiler has optimized your code away -- only d is needed, and its value can be calculated at compile time.


4

gcc is fully capable of this. Sun's compiler may be capable, but I'm more familiar with gcc. First, you should get comfortable with building gcc, and also decide if you need just the C compiler or if you need C++ or other languages. Once you've built gcc for the host you are on, you can then rebuild gcc to include a target for the target machine you ...


3

I'll assume you're using GCC, but other compilers/assemblers should have equivalent options. That's not the assembly output; it's the disassembly. If you want the input to the assembler, use gcc -S. The notable number is not 14 — the instruction is a call to a relative address of 0: 14: 40 00 00 00 call 14 <main+0xc> If you're disassembling ...


3

First, the document you link to, and the code you show, are not Sparc but PA-RISC, which is a distinct architecture. As far as I know, there is no version of HP/UX which runs on Sparc-based systems. Nevertheless, the point about leaf functions is similar across many architectures, including Sparc, PA-RISC, PowerPC, ARM, MIPS... in fact all RISC ...


3

You can use free Solaris/Oracle Studio which comes with a profiler. http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/solarisstudio/overview/index.html


3

Multiply by 2 is a left-shift and divide by 2 is a right shift (at least for unsigned numbers). If you want to left shift by 2 bits, that's a multiply by 4. So, for example, if you have the binary value: b15 b0 v V 0000 1111 0101 1000 and you wanted to extract b3 and b2, you would AND the whole lot with 0xc0 and divide by 4. ...


3

Ok, here it is: qemu is emulating user code, not system tkisem is graphically displaying cpu internals Also, there is a thing called "ISEM" (Instructional Sparc Emulator) Maybe googling will help you with detailed information. My opinion - qemu is good enough for that.


3

The annulled branch instruction causes the instruction in the delay slot -- the instruction after the branch -- to be ignored if the branch is not taken. Why would this be important? Because normally, the instruction after the branch is executed, even if the branch is taken. This is because there are two program counters, PC and NPC. PC, which indicates ...



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