Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Simply as shown in the tutorial: #include <Eigen/Sparse> #include <iostream> using namespace Eigen; using std::cout; using std::endl; typedef Triplet<int> Trip; int main(int argc, char *argv[]){ std::vector<Trip> trp, tmp; // I subtracted 1 from the indices so that the output matches your question ...


1

First, you're making term_doc a global variable, which is a big problem for performance. Pass it as an argument, doSparseWay(term_doc::SparseMatrixCSC). (The type annotation at the beginning of your function does not do anything useful.) You want to use an approach similar to the answer by walnuss: function doSparseWay(term_doc::SparseMatrixCSC) I, J, ...


2

Creating an intermediary dok matrix works in your example: In [410]: c=sparse.coo_matrix((data, (cols, rows)),shape=(3,3)).todok().tocsc() In [411]: c.A Out[411]: array([[0, 0, 0], [0, 4, 0], [0, 0, 0]], dtype=int32) A coo matrix puts your input arrays into its data,col,row attributes without change. The summing doesn't occur until it is ...


1

Yey for linear algebra! Column scaling is right multiplication of diagonal matrix: X = X*diag(sparse(fac));


0

Maybe use something along these lines: Locate the nonzero values, and take note of the column index of each: Divide each value by the entry of fac determined by the column, and put the results into X: Code: fac = log(size(X,1)./max(1,sum(X ~= 0))); %// compute normalization vector [~, col, val] = find(X); %// step 1 X(X~=0) = ...


0

Since your data is already in sparse format (indices and values), you can do the sum yourself. Just create an array that is the size of the final summed array, and loop over the indices, summing the corresponding values into the right slots. The sum2d function below shows how you would do it given that you're summing over the first dimension: import timeit ...


-1

You have to change this line atom(n,1) = (1/sqrt(scale))*exp(-pi*(n-timeShift)^2/scale^2) * cos(2*pi*frequency* (n-timeShift)+phase); To atom(n,1) = (1/sqrt(scale))*exp(-pi*(n-timeShift)^2/scale^2) * cos(2*pi*frequency* (n-timeShift)/N+phase);


2

You can construct a sparse matrix with lists of row, column, and values. E.G. >> i = [1,2,3]; >> j = [2,3,4]; >> s = [10, 20, 30]; >> A = sparse(i,j,s,5,5) A = (1,2) 10 (2,3) 20 (3,4) 30 >> full(A) ans = 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 20 0 0 0 0 0 30 0 ...


1

You could reshape the array so it is 2d, do the sum, and then shape back r.reshape(4,-1).sum(0).reshape(3,4) # == r.sum(0) That reshaping does not add much processing time. And you can convert that 2d to sparse, and see if that saves any time. My guess is that your array will have to be very large, and very sparse, to beat the straight numpy sum. If ...


2

Both eigs and eigsh require that M be positive definite (see the descriptions of M in the docstrings for more details). Your matrix M is not positive definite. Note the negative eigenvalues: In [212]: M Out[212]: array([[ 25.1, 0. , 0. , 17.3, 0. , 0. ], [ 0. , 33.6, 16.8, 8.4, 4.2, 2.1], [ 0. , 16.8, 3.6, 0. , 11. ...


0

I would try performing the operation on a smaller set of data I just tried In [22]: import scipy.sparse as sps In [23]: m = sps.csr_matrix(np.random.rand(100,100)) In [24]: m Out[24]: <100x100 sparse matrix of type '<type 'numpy.float64'>' with 10000 stored elements in Compressed Sparse Row format> In [25]: m > .5 Out[25]: ...


1

Here is some code to use sparse files: using System; using System.ComponentModel; using System.IO; using System.Runtime.InteropServices; using System.Text; using System.Threading; using Microsoft.Win32.SafeHandles; public static class SparseFiles { private const int FILE_SUPPORTS_SPARSE_FILES = 64; private const int FSCTL_SET_SPARSE = 0x000900c4; ...


1

The first complication is the np.argsort(x) returns a 2d array. Lets do the sort on flattened x to get a simpler 1d perm: In [1118]: perm=np.argsort(x,None) In [1119]: perm Out[1119]: array([10, 17, 1, 14, 13, 9, 16, 0, 6, 8, 5, 11, 2, 15, 7, 3, 12, 4], dtype=int32) this sorts x as we expect, right? In [1120]: x[:,perm] Out[1120]: ...



Top 50 recent answers are included