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You currently cannot specify index hints with Entity Framework (EF6), so I could never force the use of a spatial index. Possibly there is a way to change my LINQ query to trick EF into using the spatial index, but I could not find a way. My solution was to bypass EF and use raw SQL via SQLquery(). string sql = "SELECT * FROM [dbo].[parcels] ...


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Looking at the Error List Warnings after attempting an "Update Model from Database" I now see: Error 6005: The data type 'geometry' is currently not supported for the target Entity Framework version; the column 'test_geometry' in the table 'def.spatialdb.routegeometry' was excluded. This is using latest Entity Framework 6, so I guess it's not possible ...


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Short answer- No, it is not. I have seen this tangentially referenced throughout blogs and have found no concrete examples of implementation. It seems to be related to the fact that spatial indexes are filtered indexes, which are not supported in Entity Framework. As support for my answer I constructed a POC console app with the most recent version of ...


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The clue is in the error text: Operand type clash: sys.geometry is incompatible with sys.geography (emphasis mine) My guess is that [bhdev].[dbo].[REF_TRACTS].geom is a geometry type column instead of geography like it should be. You're going to have to convert it with something like: geography::Point([bhdev].[dbo].[REF_TRACTS].geom.X, ...


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Well, let's take a look at the polygon: Looks reasonable, but pretty busy in the lower right: There you can see the self-intersection, and self-intersecting polygons aren't acceptable (see Solr Spatial search with self-intersecting polygons for some more information on that). It looks to me like you're trying to be more precise than your application ...


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Try removing .fmt to the file and use .txt instead, that worked for me


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Here is the "high-effort approach" (not really) set.seed(1) X <- matrix(runif(100*200),nrow=100) X <- apply(X,1,sort) lattice::levelplot(X,contour=TRUE) library(raster) r <- raster(X) z <- cut(r, seq(0, 1, 0.1)) p <- rasterToPolygons(z, dissolve=TRUE) spplot(p)


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You have more options depending on what do you want to visualize. If you want to show: Map with markers: I recommand to use NewMapComponent. Documentation and example can be found in Pentaho > Browse Files > Public > plugin-samples > CDE Reference > Map Component Reference. You can choose different providers of map layer, zoom to any position defined by ...


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For anyone else who might need this, here is a dodgy workaround. I will try to change the webservice though. ArrayList<LatLng> polylist = new ArrayList<>(); String[] parts = news.getArea().replace("POLYGON ((","").replace("))","").split("(?<!\\\\), "); for(String part : parts){ String[] subpart = ...


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In short: newds2 <- SpatialLinesDataFrame(l.spatial, newds1, match.ID = FALSE) ## or you can use the rownames of newds1 in the lines loop) There are 42 distinct lines, made by matching every coordinate to each other coordinate once. FWIW, you don't need to convert from factor for numeric: x <- c(2,4,6,3,7,9,1) y <- c(6,4,8,2,9,6,1) id ...


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Holes are supposed to have the opposite ring direction, e.g. by mine@polygons[[1]]@Polygons[[2]]@coords = mine@polygons[[1]]@Polygons[[2]]@coords[5:1,] plot(mine, col = 'blue') you get the plot below. Where did this data come from?


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It depends on the type of object you want the merging of the two objects to be. You could use the command rasterize() of the class {Raster}, to create a raster object from your spatialPolygons object that matches the resolution and origin of your rasterLayer. Let me know if this helps.


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The problem was that the row.names didn't match. So in prep for the spCbind(), you need: row.names(spatial.object)<-0:43 row.names(dataframe)<-0:43


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It is the polygon centroid. The source code is found here, look for function FindCG. The equations computed are equivalent to those found on wikipedia, but in addition deal with the special case of polygons with (near) zero area, and normalize polygon coordinates by the first point (to increase numerical precision and/or avoid overflow).


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As you have a spatial data to cluster, so DBSCAN is best suited for you data. You can do this clustering using dbscan() function provided by fpc, a R package. library(fpc) lat<-c(1,2,3,10,11,12,20,21,22,23) lon<-c(5,6,7,30,31,32,50,51,52,53) DBSCAN <- dbscan(cbind(lat, lon), eps = 1.5, MinPts = 3) plot(lon, lat, col = DBSCAN$cluster, pch = 20) ...


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You're a little vague in your requirements, do you just want to find out the coordinates of a point a certain distance from your current location in a given direction? Or get a circle of a radius of a particular distance around your coordinates? Or draw a line of a certain length from your coordinates to another point a particular distance away? I assume ...


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Reading the definition of coordinates for SpatialPolygonsDataFrame I can see that it is actually the same than getSpPPolygonsLabptSlots as it retrieves the labpt slot, that is to say a convenient point to put a label for the polygon. > selectMethod("coordinates",signature="SpatialPolygonsDataFrame") Method Definition: function (obj, ...) { .local ...


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This clear report has revealed a bug in R package sp, that became only manifest in R 3.1.x See here for more detail. sp 1.1-0, available from CRAN, has fixed this.


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This is indeed a bug with polygons that go over the edge of a raster. It has been fixed in version 2.3-40 (now on CRAN), so it should go away if you update the raster package. Here is a workaround (removing the part of the polygon that goes over the edge). library(raster) library(rgeos) r <- raster(nrow=225, ncols=478, xmn=-15.8, xmx=32, ymn=-9.4, ...


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You usually need to set some values to the raster layer. For a mask layer its always best to set values to 1. library(raster) library(rgeos) # make sample raster test <- raster(nrow=225, ncols=478, xmn=-15.8, xmx=32, ymn=-9.4, ymx=13.1) # set values of raster for mask test <- setValues(test, 1) # make point buffer p2=readWKT("POINT(15 ...


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This is because at least one observation in data1 is not complete, i.e. has missing values. Hence, errorsarlm wants to subset the data, i.e. restrict to complete cases. But it can't do it know - that's what the error message says. Best is to subset the data manually or correct the incomplete cases.


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Around the time the question was asked, the only way to convert between GCJ-02 and WGS-84 was to use an interpolation method with coordinates based on regression from a data set of Google China and satellite imagery coordinates. There is an Objective-C library on GitHub at https://github.com/maxime/ChinaMapDeviation. However, since the question was asked, ...


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Putting this up here as an alternative answer just in case anyone else runs into this and finds it useful, and also for completeness to include as much of this information in once place as possible. If you aren't using SqlGeometries at all in your c# code (I just had the library included purely for sending the database values) then it seems more efficient ...


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While perhaps not ideal since it's forcing you to use an older version, I was able to solve a mismatch involving the Geometry DLLS after an NHibernate upgrade by using a binding redirect on the assembly declaration in the web.config <runtime> <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1"> <dependentAssembly> ...


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The reason you're seeing that error is that the SRID of a table (defined in the ST_GEOMETRY_COLUMNS table) doesn't match with the one of the geometries contained in it (defined in the geometry field of each record). If you really need to change the SRID of a table (even though you shouldn't mess with SRIDs, as they are internally managed by SDE), follow ...


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Since making a short comment on your question, I've had chance to fully play around with the options. It appears that at present (even trying .NET 4.6 and SQL 2014) you cannot set SqlGeography OR SqlGeometry as the typeof() parameter when defining a column for a DataTable. For absolute clarity, you can do it in .NET and even populate it, but you then ...


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When I was first learning about sp and related packages I found Barry Rowlingson’s site very useful. It includes: A cheatsheet Really useful reference sheet with hints about how to do things using R packages\ http://www.maths.lancs.ac.uk/~rowlings/Teaching/UseR2012/cheatsheet.html Introduction to Spatial An explanation of the spatialDataframe structures ...



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