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1

Since there is no addLabelfunction, the addPopups function might be a valuable workaround. leaflet(data = quakes[1:20,]) %>% addTiles() %>% addPopups(~long, ~lat, ~as.character(mag), options = popupOptions(minWidth = 20, closeOnClick = FALSE, closeButton = FALSE))


-1

Could not comment. Practically same question here. Apparently it cannot be done.


1

If you look at your fitted model, it will have a sill parameter (i.e. nugget + psill), but it is beyond the extent of your samples. sill = sum(model.3112$psill) It is possible that you did not have a point-pair distance that was far enough to arrive at the range to the sill. I do not think this is not a problem, so long as you are using this ...


0

This thread is a bit old (in the meantime, handling of spatial index seems to have changed a bit in spatialite), but here's what I have come up with in my project just now (year 2015). The query is supposed to take each point from a pointlayer and find the closest line from a line layer. I'm not sure how well structured this code is and how fast it will ...


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Found some older library references causing System.Data v2.0.0.0 to be loaded. I added a new assemblyBinding to make sure it to loads v4.0 <configuration> <runtime> <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1"> <dependentAssembly> <assemblyIdentity name="System.Data" ...


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If you are using SQL Server Spatial types on a machine without SQL Server installed, you will need to include the following NuGet package with your project. https://www.nuget.org/packages/Microsoft.SqlServer.Types Allows you to use SQL Server spatial types on a machine without SQL Server installed. Useful when deploying to Windows Azure. Also enables ...


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(FYI: It's usually bad form for 3 questions in a single SO post) Q1: You didn't actually "project" anything in the first block of operations. You created a "spatial" object from a plain data frame and "stated" what coordinate reference system (CRS) it was in. You also did that accurately as you just had lat/lon values. Do a str(seoul3112) to see the ...


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I'll provide answers to your code related questions. The rest of your questions (d, e, and f) are more theory related. First, in your comment, when you changed the proj4string, the distance units should have changed on the plot. Did they? Based on your comment, it sounds like that did not happen. a) In addition to playing around with the cutoff distance, ...


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I ended up writing a code myself which runs on a large data set. Am posting it here in case any wayward traveler runs into the same problems I was having. Hope it helps someone :-) SpatialWeight <- function(SortedData,max,DistFunc = function(x){return(1/x)},rownormal=F){ #Creates A spatial weights matrix for large data set. # #Args: # Inputs ...


0

the first error could be due to a neo datastore from a neo version different to that installed in geoserver, or maybe a db copy taken from a running instance of neo, or it's locked for other reasons. it's hard to tell. the second is definitely an api call in the spatial extension that is reading from Neo outside of a transaction. you need to wrap the call, ...


1

your coordinates are degrees latitude and longitude, but you don't inform gstat that they are. Hence, gstat will assume it can compute Euclidian distances from these numbers, which do not make sense. The advice is to learn how to use gstat after transforming your point to SpatialPointsDataFrame using package sp, and then learn how to project your data such ...


1

DECLARE @a geometry; DECLARE @b geometry; SET @a = GEOMETRY::STPolyFromText('POLYGON((-10277454.3014 4527261.7601, -10277449.1674 4527236.5722, -10277503.1433 4527245.177, -10277462.2333 4527281.9267, -10277454.3014 4527261.7601))',3857); SELECT * FROM [GIS].[ggon].[blah] WHERE [Shape].STIntersects(@a) = 1


3

This query should go a long way (be much faster): WITH school AS ( SELECT s.osm_id AS school_id, text 'school' AS type, s.osm_id, s.name, s.way_geo FROM planet_osm_point s , LATERAL ( SELECT 1 FROM planet_osm_point WHERE ST_DWithin(way_geo, s.way_geo, 500, false) AND amenity = 'bar' LIMIT 1 -- bar exists -- ...


0

I have had to give this as an answer to make output more clear: First attempt with the SQL command as per above in your error message: mysql> CREATE TABLE city (id VARCHAR(16) NOT NULL, version BIGINT NOT NULL, date_created DATETIME NOT NULL, last_updated DATETIME NOT NULL, name VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL, CONSTRAINT cityPK PRIMARY KEY (id)) type=InnoDB; ...


1

I could not view my Geography polygon because the points used the clockwise order! See this link.


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No, that's not "normal" behavior. You should be able to view both Geography and Geometry results in the Spatial Results tab. I tried both your queries in my local SSMS 2012 and they work fine. Can you make sure that in your query window that you right-click and have "Results To -> Grid" selected?


1

The 3 sub-selects that you use are very inefficient. Write them as LEFT JOIN clauses and the query should be much more efficient: SELECT school.osm_id AS school_osm_id, school.name AS school_name, school.way AS school_way, restaurant.osm_id AS restaurant_osm_id, restaurant.name AS restaurant_name, restaurant.way AS restaurant_way, ...


0

Try this with inner join syntax and compare the results, there should be no duplicates. My guess is it should take 1/3rd the time or better than the original query : select a.id as a_id, a.name as a_name, a.geog as a_geo, b.id as b_id, b.name as b_name, b.geog as b_geo, c.id as c_id, c.name as c_name, c.geog as c_geo from table1 as a INNER ...


0

Does it make any difference if you use explicit joins? SELECT a.id as a_id, a.name as a_name, a.geog as a_geog, b.id as b_id, b.name as b_name, b.geog as b_geog, c.id as c_id, c.name as c_name, c.geog as c_geog FROM table1 a JOIN table1 b ON b.type = 'B' AND ST_DWithin(a.geog, b.geog, 100) JOIN table1 c ON c.type = 'C' AND ST_DWithin(a.geog, ...


0

Within ElasticSearch you can select the use of quadtrees by setting the tree option to quadtree If you want to calculate the quadtree value yourself (outside of ElasticSearch) I recommend the python-geohash module which also includes a robust quadtree implementation. With this library, calculating a quadtree is as simple as: quad = ...


0

I tried the same approach as you, and had the same problem (TO_WKTGEOMETRY export only works for 2D geometries). My current approach is to use a custom function to apply the SRID through the object dot notation: CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION APPLY_SRID ( GEOM IN OUT MDSYS.SDO_GEOMETRY , SRID IN NUMBER DEFAULT 8307 ) RETURN MDSYS.SDO_GEOMETRY AS BEGIN ...


1

The method that I've used before is using the Path class matplotlib. This has a contains_point method which does exactly that. As well as a contains_points which allows you to query an array of points. To use this you would do from scipy.spatial import ConvexHull from matplotlib.path import Path hull = ConvexHull( points ) hull_path = Path( ...


2

I think the raster package is the way to go: require(raster) cur.data <- read.csv("LVB_TRMM_Monthly_Rainfall.csv") r <- cur.data coordinates(r) <- ~ Longitude + Latitude gridded(r) <- TRUE # Stack each variable as a band in the raster: tmp <- raster(r, layer = 1) for (i in 2:5) { tmp <- stack(tmp, raster(r, layer = i)) } r <- tmp ...


1

You can apply a rolling function to your time series for a window of 6. library(xts) ## you read you time serie using the handy `read.zoo` ## Note the use of the index here dx <- read.zoo(text="Date Time DOP X Y noofclosepoints 4705 09.07.2014 11:05:33 3.4 686926.8 231039.3 14 4706 09.07.2014 11:10:53 3.2 686930.5 ...


2

Here's an example: library(raster) library(ggplot2) download.file("https://docs.google.com/uc?id=0ByY3OAw62EShakxJZkplOXZ0RGM&export=download", tf <- tempfile(fileext = ".csv")) df <- read.csv(tf, row.names = 1) skorea <- getData("GADM", country = "South Korea", level = 2) skorea <- fortify(skorea) ggplot() + geom_map(data = skorea, map ...


1

There are many spatial indexing solutions, quadtrees, r-tree, and they are listed here. There are also tools with built-in tools like QGIS and GRASS. There are also heavy handed solution like PostGIS if you have lots of data. However, looking at your image, and since you state that your objects are already rasterized, can you convert you objects image above ...


0

The problem is that write.dbf cannot write a dataframe into an attribute table. So I try to changed it to character data. My initial wrong code was: d1<-data.frame(as.character(data1)) colnames(d1)<-c("county") #using rbind should give them same column name d2<-data.frame(as.character(data2)) colnames(d2)<-c("county") county<-rbind(d1,d2) ...


0

Your latitude values in this csv are reverted when compared to the dataset you previously had from the previous question you mentioned. All you have to do is to invert the row numbers in this new dataset: Right after your line: all_data = read.table("windspeed.txt",header = TRUE) Invert the row numbers using: max_row= max(all_data$row) ...


0

Sure it's a bit late. But I think I just figured out a solution. I have a similar situation with a 71k*71k matrix. I just reworked the nb2mat function to use big.matrix from the bigmemory library. We need to define two new functions: my_nb2mat = function (neighbours, glist = NULL, style = "W", zero.policy = NULL) { if (is.null(zero.policy)) ...


0

It seems I've looked at the problem in the wrong way. After more offline research I found out that it actually is sufficient to create a random Poisson value which represents the number of objects, for example n = np.random.poisson(100) and create the same amount of random values between 0 and 1 x = np.random.rand(n) y = np.random.rand(n) Now I just need ...



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