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I was able to find what I was remembering vaguely in this unofficial Q&A by hsivonen. I'm still looking for other such "features". [...] In this case, you must avoid constructs that aren’t supported in text/html (e.g. div as a child of p). Searching about more, I found this page (second post from top) : but basically a p can never enclose a div ...


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XHTML, being XML supports xml-stylesheet declarations. Not just CSS but also XSLT. Which can transform the document tree before presentationXSLT also supports inclusions via document("foo.xml"), which can be used as an XInclude surrogate since no browser supports the latter right now. XML parsers validate well-formedness XHTML supports namespaces, allowing ...


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In XHTML, you can use self-closing syntax (/>) on non-void elements: <script src="js.js" /> And void elements can have stray end tags: <input></input>


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Yes, for example entity declarations and references to entities so defined. They are part of XML, so they must be supported when using XML serialization, as it is required to follow generic XML rules. Example: <!DOCTYPE html [ <!ENTITY foo "Hello world"> ]> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head> ...


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Technically it could have gone either way, but there are many strong reasons to use semicolons. In programming languages, it's more common to see semicolons marking the ends of lines and commas separating things within a line (there are a few exceptions to this, like enums). Most TypeScript types are large enough that they span multiple lines, which makes ...



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