Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

75

Try Javascript .NET: http://javascriptdotnet.codeplex.com/ It implements Google V8. You can compile and run Javascript directly from .NET code with it, and supply CLI objects to be used by the Javascript code as well. And V8 is probably the best engine ever created in terms of performance, it generates native code from Javascript.


63

The open source JavaScript interpreter Jint (http://jint.codeplex.com) does exactly what you are looking for. Edit: The project has been entirely rewritten and is now hosted on Github at https://github.com/sebastienros/jint


55

There are various approaches to JavaScript execution, even when doing JIT. V8 and Nitro (formerly known as SquirrelFish Extreme) choose to do a whole-method JIT, meaning that they compile all JavaScript code down to native instructions when they encounter script, and then simply execute that as if it was compiled C code. SpiderMonkey uses a "tracing" JIT ...


30

Anybody just tuning in check out Jurassic as well: http://jurassic.codeplex.com/


27

You might also be interested in Microsoft ClearScript which is hosted on codeplex and published under the Ms-Pl licence. I am no Microsoft fanboy, but I must admit that the V8 support has about the same functionnalities as Javascript.Net, and more important, the project is still maintained. As far as I am concerned, the support for delegates also functions ...


26

The problem is not with the Javascript math; it's with the canvas. http://jsfiddle.net/LDWBX/ function bigCircle(angle) { var radius = 5000; //the bigger, the worse var x = canvas.width/2 + radius*Math.cos(angle); var y = canvas.height/2 + radius*Math.sin(angle); ctx.beginPath(); ctx.arc(x, y, radius, 0, 2 * Math.PI); ctx.lineWidth ...


15

Very good question with no good answer so far... I'm disappointed. Address of a variable can be treated as its unique identifier. Being able to see such an address would help with debugging identity problems. It's when you have two or more variables and you expect they all point to the same object but comparing any two of them with === operator returns ...


15

Fixed it. You need the 'autoconf2.13' package. Install it with apt-get. Go to the SpiderMonkey source code page on Mozilla. Find the hg repository (linked below) and download a snapshot of the Mozilla tree. Don't clone it, just get the archive as .tar.gz or .tar.bz2 from the top bar. http://hg.mozilla.org/index.cgi/mozilla-central/file/tip Unzip the ...


14

I'm afraid the difference is the language they are written in, or what it means. People use C/C++ to write all manner of things (like Firefox) whereas Java is most prevalent in Application Servers. From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhino_%28JavaScript_engine%29: Rhino converts JavaScript scripts into Java classes. Rhino works in both compiled as well ...


14

The thing is that unlike other languages, JavaScript creates all variables at the start of a function. This means that the code: (function(){ if(myVar == undefined){ alert(myVar); } if(myVar == undefined){ var myVar = 5; } })(); Is actually compiled and interpreted as (function(){ var myVar; if(myVar == undefined){ ...


13

I'm using MongoDB on Ubuntu Server 11.04, installed it after making fresh OS install using this instruction: http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Ubuntu+and+Debian+packages Everything is working fine out of the box. Is it critical for you to build MongoDB from scratch?


12

There is also Google's V8 JavaScript engine, builds nicely on Linux, embedding API seems quite straightforward too: (Compared to SpiderMonkey's, never looked at the JavaScriptCore API) http://code.google.com/apis/v8/get_started.html


10

Are you sure a Try...Catch block won't work? This example works for me in firefox. try { eval("hello I am a plain text without quotes"); } catch(err) { alert("error caught"); }


10

I regularly run V8 and Sunspider benchmarks on both Rhino and Spidermonkey (disclaimer: I'm a committer on the Rhino project). The current Rhino release (1.7R3) is still quite a bit slower than Spidermonkey, but recent git snapshots have caught up nicely. (Note that I'm talking about interpreted Spidermonkey without Jaegermonkey or other JITs - Jaegermonkey ...


9

It depends on what you're trying to do with JavaScript. If your intent is just to learn the language then I recommend using a web browser such as Chrome or Firefox and using their built-in (or addon) JavaScript consoles. As to your specific question about standalone JavaScript interpreters, here are some notes: Rhino - implemented in Java, intended ...


9

Node uses V8, which does not implement E4X as of now. There's a 2 year old issue, but still active issue on the topic. But it has no real "status" nor was it assigned to anyone. So in short: The answer is no.


8

Good old readline(); https://developer.mozilla.org/En/SpiderMonkey/Introduction_to_the_JavaScript_shell#readline()


8

[].concat is Array.prototype.concat. Array.concat is a Firefox-only static method that concatenates one or more arrays and ignores its this argument.


7

This is a fun one! So, SpiderMonkey internally uses a tagged value representation to represent JavScript's "untyped values" -- this allows the VM to determine things like "the variable stored in a is an number, and the value stored in b is an number, so running a + b does numerical addition". There are a bunch of different schemes for value tagging, and ...


7

Some engines may perform such an optimisation. The Google Closure compiler certainly does so: function withVar(){return"stackoverflow"}var a=withVar(); There will be virtually no difference in speed, but the "optimised" version is shorter (and therefore quicker for the client to download). Here's the results of a benchmark: You can see that the "flat" ...


7

V8 is the fastest, because it compiles all JS to machine code. SpiderMonkey (what FF uses) is fast too, but compiles to an intermediate byte-code, not machine code. That's the major difference with V8. EDIT- Newer Firefox releases come with a newer variant of SpideMonkey; TraceMonkey. TraceMonkey does JIT compilation of critical parts, and maybe other smart ...


7

I guess I am still unclear about what it is you are trying to do, but JScript.NET might be worth looking into, though Managed JScript seems like it may be more appropriate for your needs (it is more like JavaScript than JScript.NET). Personally, I thought it would be cool to integrate V8 somehow, but I didn't get past downloading the source code; wish I had ...


7

If it would be possible at all, it would be very dependent on the javascript engine. The more modern javascript engine compile their code using a just in time compiler and messing with their internal variables would be either bad for performance, or bad for stability. If the engine allows it, why not make a function call interface to some native code to ...


7

The most in-your-face one is obviously the fact that ECMAScript is prototype-based and Ruby is class-plus-mixin-based. Also, in Ruby, encapsulation is done with objects, in ECMAScript with closures. However, my guess is that Ruby's control flow constructs are going to be a much bigger hurdle than its object model. After all, James Coglan's JS.Class is ...


6

I mainly use HtmlUnit under jython for these use cases. Also I published a simple article on the subject: Web Scraping Ajax and Javascript sites.


6

There's no similar feature in the other JavaScript engines as far as I know. But it is easy to convert code using this feature: try { A } catch (e if B) { C } into code that just uses standard features that all the JavaScript engines support: try { A } catch (e) { if (B) { C } else { throw e; } } The example you ...


6

You can try ironJS, looks promising although it is in heavy development. https://github.com/fholm/IronJS


6

Yes, creating functions uses more memory. ... and, no, interpreters don't optimize Case A down to a single function. The reason is the JS scope chain requires each instance of a function to capture the variables available to it at the time it's created. That said, modern interpreters are better about Case A than they used to be, but largely because the ...


6

Read this post about the javascript event queue and see if it answers most of your question. There will be a native OS thread that handles interfacing with actual OS events (mouse events, keyboard events, timer events, network I/O events, etc...) and those are then fed into the JS queue where the JS engine can further dispatch them to Javascript code. How ...


6

update: looks like spidermonkey-bin is no longer available through the launchpad ppa plus the v8jslint repo was down when I tried to clone it.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible