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5

You can build from source, but spider monkey is still available on ubuntu, it's just been renamed to "libmozjs". Install "libmozjs-24-bin" and then either refer to it as "js24" or symlink /usr/bin/js24 to "js" and you should be good to go.


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JS::Heap<T> are used in data structures which reside on the heap. Tracing is indeed a requirement. Without it, the GC may either determine your object is unreachable or relocate it without updating your JS::Heap<T> handle. Tracing objects in spidermonkey is simple. You need to request an extra GC root tracer using ...


2

I suppose what they mean by "random-logic lexical scanner" is that the lexical scanner was built by hand (or by many hands) rather than using a regular-expression-based table-driven lexical-scanner generator such as (f)lex. Presumably, the word is used as per the hacker lexicon, possibly acceptation 4 (incoherent, inelegant, disorganized) ["The program has a ...


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This question is a quite old one, but maybe the answer will help somebody. This function makes a cross-compartment wrapper for the given JS object. Given that JS object created for one compartment cannot be shared with the different one directly, there is a concept of a wrapper that has to be prepared in order to share the same instance of a JS object ...


2

I'm going to guess that you're entering this into different debug consoles. One debug console treats that as a Program, and the other as an Expression. {}+{} When interpreted as a Program this is equivalent to { // empty block } // No semicolon inserted because statement is a block. (+ Number({})) // Prefix + operator coerces its argument to a ...


1

You didn't mention the behavior of your program when trying to call the function asynchronously, but I assume that it would seg fault when trying to call the function since the GC might have moved it. You need a way to store the function object (it's not a value as in your code). JS::Rooted is not acceptable in this situation since stack rooting expects gc ...


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The JS_DestroyContext call does garbage collection to reclaim memory used by the context's global. Presumably you should set your JS::Rooted to JSVAL_NULL before destroying the context so there are no stack roots of the global when the GC runs.


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You should've cited the beginning of that paragraph, not the end: At code execution, a scope chain may be augmented using with statement and catch clause objects. So what your sentence refers to are only object environment records - scope objects in which variables live. Those are typically imaginary, described for specification purposes only (and can ...


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If it's of any use to you, I got around this by redirecting terminal output to a file. So all I do is use the 'print' command from the SpiderMonkey shell(which will print to the terminal) and then redirect the terminal output to a file. Example: //from SpiderMonkey print('Test - write to file'); //terminal(assume script is called test.js) ./js test.js ...


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Javascript is singled-threaded but browser is not. The browser has at least threee threads: Javascript engine thread, UI thread and timing thread, where timing of setTimeout and setInterval are done by the timing thread. When calling setTimeout or setInterval, a timer thread in the browser starts counting down and when time up puts the callback function in ...


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No it's not possible and I'm afraid duktape could be violating the spec unless it took some great pains to ensure it's not observable. You can store pointers in objects so to store 64-bit ints directly on an object you need pointers to have the same size: Local<FunctionTemplate> function_template = FunctionTemplate::New(isolate); // Instances of this ...


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V8 isolates are single-threaded (only one thread can be entered into an isolate at a time and access its heap/execute its code), thus "creating a new thread" means creating a new isolate which is a very heavy-weight thing to do so you definitely wouldn't be able to do it in a response to a request anyway. You can create many v8 isolates and run them in ...


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Thread-safety of a library means that the library can be used in a multithreaded environment. SpiderMonkey library can be integrated into a multithreaded C++ application. That has nothing to do with JavaScript language model. However certain rules and restrictions apply. Theses rules are confusing as they have been changing from one version of the library ...


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It's threadsafe in regard to your C++ application. You can use the library from multiple threads inside your C++ code, without concern for locking data structures, etc. In this context, it's irrelevant what the library does (in your case, execute JS code). What matters is that the library itself can be used in a multithreaded environment. From Wikipedia: ...


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Complexity and portability. Transforming from source code to and kind of object code, whether it's bytecode for a virtual machine or machine code for a real machine, is a complex process. Bytecode more closely mimics what most real machines do, and so it's easier to work with: better for optimizing the code to run faster, transforming to machine code for an ...


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Saving the excellent answers from the comments as an actual answer, so that this question can be marked as answered. setTimeout is not part of the JavaScript language, it's part of the browser's window object, which is the global object for a web page's JavaScript code: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/WindowTimers.setTimeout node.js has a ...



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