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222

The Theory In theory, when a thread tries to lock a mutex and it does not succeed, because the mutex is already locked, it will go to sleep, immediately allowing another thread to run. It will continue to sleep until being woken up, which will be the case once the mutex is being unlocked by whatever thread was holding the lock before. When a thread tries to ...


32

When you use regular locks (mutexes, critical sections etc), operating system puts your thread in the WAIT state and preempts it by scheduling other threads on the same core. This has a performance penalty if the wait time is really short, because your thread now has to wait for a preemption to receive CPU time again. Besides, kernel objects are not ...


17

You have the right idea, but your asm is broken: cmpxchg can't work with an immediate operand, only registers. lock is not a valid prefix for mov. mov to an aligned address is atomic on x86, so you don't need lock anyway. It has been some time since I've used AT&T syntax, hope I remembered everything: spin_lock: xorl %ecx, %ecx incl %ecx ...


16

It depends on what you're doing. In general application code, you'll want to avoid spinlocks. In low-level stuff where you'll only hold the lock for a couple of instructions, and latency is important, a spinlock mat be a better solution than a lock. But those cases are rare, especially in the kind of applications where C# is typically used.


16

You are just not testing a scenario where SpinLock can improve the threading. The core idea behind a spin-lock is that a thread-context switch is very expensive operation, costing between 2000 and 10,000 cpu cycles. And that if it is likely that a thread can acquire a lock by waiting for a bit (spinning) then the extra cycles burned waiting can pay off by ...


15

If I understand your question, you're asking why spin locks are a bad idea on single core machines. They should still work, but can be much more expensive than true thread-sleeping concurrency: When you use a spinlock, you're essentially asserting that you don't think you will have to wait long. You are saying that you think it's better to maintain the ...


14

Looks fine to me. Btw, here is the textbook implementation that is more efficient even in the contended case. void lock(volatile int *exclusion) { while (__sync_lock_test_and_set(exclusion, 1)) while (*exclusion) ; }


12

So I'm wondering: * Is it correct? In the context mentioned, I would say yes. * Is it optimal? That's a loaded question. By reinventing the wheel you are also reinventing a lot of problems that have been solved by other implementations I'd expect a waste loop on failure where you aren't trying to access the lock word. Use of a full barrier in the ...


12

PAUSE notifies CPU that this is spinlock wait loop so memory and cache accesses may be optimized. Also PAUSE may actually stop CPU for some time while NOP runs as fast as possible. Here is detailed explanation: http://siyobik.info/index.php?module=x86&id=232 EDIT: URL above is broken, try http://siyobik.info.gf/main/reference/instruction/PAUSE Update: ...


9

In C#, "Spin locks" have been, in my experience, almost always worse than taking a lock - it's a rare occurrence where spin locks will outperform a lock. However, that's not always the case. .NET 4 is adding a System.Threading.SpinLock structure. This provides benefits in situations where a lock is held for a very short time, and being grabbed repeatedly. ...


9

In the Linux kernel we have this in arch/powerpc/include/asm/processor.h /* Macros for adjusting thread priority (hardware multi-threading) */ #define HMT_very_low() asm volatile("or 31,31,31 # very low priority") #define HMT_low() asm volatile("or 1,1,1 # low priority") #define HMT_medium_low() asm volatile("or 6,6,6 # medium low ...


8

There are several reasons why, at least in Linux, sleeping in spinlocks is not allowed: If thread A sleeps in a spinlock, and thread B then tries to acquire the same spinlock, a uniprocessor system will deadlock. Thread B will never go to sleep (because spinlocks don't have the waitlist necessary to awaken B when A is done), and thread A will never get a ...


7

I am new in the kernel but from what I gather from Robert Love book "Linux Kernel Development", it says that if the interrupts are already disabled on the processor before your code starts locking, when you call spin_unlock_irq you will release the lock in an erroneous manner. If you save the flags and release it with the flags, the function ...


7

Well, Understanding the Linux Kernel is old. Since it was written, the Linux kernel was updated to use the so-called ticket spinlocks. The lock is basically a 16-bit quantity split in two bytes: let's call one Next (like the next ticket in a dispenser) and the other Owner (like the 'Now Serving' number over a counter). A spinlock is initialized with both ...


7

A processor suffers a severe performance penalty when exiting the loop because it detects a possible memory order violation. The PAUSE instruction provides a hint to the processor that the code sequence is a spin-wait loop. The processor uses this hint to avoid the memory order violation in most situations, which greatly improves processor performance. For ...


7

spin_lock_irqsave is basically used to save the interrupt state before taking the spin lock, this is because spin lock disables the interrupt, when the lock is taken in interrupt context, and re-enables it when while unlocking. The interrupt state is saved so that it should reinstate the interrupts again. Example: Lets say interrupt x was disabled before ...


6

In fact, not only is this inefficient, it is not even guaranteed to work, since there is no "happens-before" edge in the code that you are showing. To create a happens-before edge you need to: Access a volatile variable Synchronise on a shared resource Use a concurrent utils lock. As mentioned in another comment, the easiest solution, is simply to ensure ...


6

As the previous poster indicates, every modern machine type has a special class of instruction known as 'atomics' that do operate as the previous poster indicates... they serialize execution against at least the specified memory location. On x86, there is a LOCK assembler prefix that indicates to the machine that the next instruction should be handled ...


6

The key part here is "on two different CPUs". Some background: Historically on uni-processor (UP) systems the only source of concurrency was hardware interrupts. It was enough to cli/sti around the critical section to prevent an IRQ handler from messing things up. Then there was the giant lock design where the kernel would effectively run on a single CPU ...


6

Try using OSSpinLock instead. Documentation is here: http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Darwin/Reference/ManPages/man3/spinlock.3.html


6

SpinLock is a struct, and you are reading it from a readonly field. The C# spec says that in this case, in order to call a potentially mutating function, the struct must be copied to a mutable local variable. This happens under the covers. Your calls to Enter and Exit happen on a fresh copy of your lock. For that reason, Enter is operating on an unlocked ...


6

No, WFE does not have the guarantees you're thinking it does. The ARM manual describes a large set of events that must cause you to come out from WFE but the core is allowed to wake up for other reasons. For example a core is allowed to implement a timeout on its WFE implementation. These events are the same as the events for WFI with the addition of some ...


5

To answer the two parts of your question: Even on non-preemtive kernels interrupt handlers may still be executed for example ... spin_lock() isn't supposed to protect against interrupt handlers - only user context kernel code. spin_lock_irqsave() is the interrupt-disabling version, and this isn't a no-op on a non-preemptive uniprocessor. ...or I ...


5

It depends on the type of lock you're talking about. If you're talking about any kind of kernel internal lock, they will be released as appropriate (as your system would soon crash otherwise). In general these kind of locks are not owned by the process itself, but rather by some internal kernel workflow, and usually don't remain locked after the process ...


5

Before Linux was a preemptive kernel, spinlocks on UP were basically no-ops. Once the kernel was made preemptive, a call to preempt_disable() was added to spinlocks. So it goes more or less like this: You want to protect against some conflicting CPU, use some kind of spinlock. You want to protect against a conflicting softirq, tasklet,... use ...


5

The cost of a thread-context switch is the reason why spinlocks can be useful. The usual number that's quoted is between 2000 and 10,000 cpu cycles for a switch on Windows. Cost that's associated by having to store and reload the processor state and the stalls due to the guaranteed cache misses. This is pure overhead, nothing useful gets done. So a ...


4

In response to your questions: Looks ok to me Assuming the OS supports GCC (and GCC has the functions implemented); this should work on all x86 Operating Systems. The GCC documentation suggests that a warning will be produced if they are not supported on a given platform. There's nothing x86-64 specific here, so I don't see why not. This can be expanded to ...


4

Found it, boost calls them condition variables: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_39_0/doc/html/thread/synchronization.html#thread.synchronization.condvar_ref


4

For my realtime work, particularly with device drivers, I've used them a fair bit. It turns out that (when last I timed this) waiting for a sync object like a semaphore tied to a hardware interrupt chews up at least 20 microseconds, no matter how long it actually takes for the interrupt to occur. A single check of a memory-mapped hardware register, followed ...


4

It is pertty much a loop that keeps going till a certain condition is met: while(cantGoOn) {};



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