Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

The cost of a thread-context switch is the reason why spinlocks can be useful. The usual number that's quoted is between 2000 and 10,000 cpu cycles for a switch on Windows. Cost that's associated by having to store and reload the processor state and the stalls due to the guaranteed cache misses. This is pure overhead, nothing useful gets done. So a ...


4

I am not a scheduler guru, but I would like to explain how I see it. Here are several things. preempt_disable() doesn't disable IRQ. It just increases a thread_info->preempt_count variable Disabling interrupts also disables preemption because scheduler isn't working after that - but only on a single-CPU machine. On the SMP it isn't enough because when you ...


3

I have standardized the locking texture to be img0. Lock Type 1: Thread warps have a shared program counter. If a single thread grabs the lock, the other threads in the warp will still be stuck in the loop. In practice, this compiles but results in a deadlock. Examples: StackOverflow, OpenGL.org while (imageAtomicExchange(img0,coord,1u)==1u); ...


3

Shortest would probably be: acquire: lock bts [eax],0 jc acquire release: mov [eax],0 For performance, it's best to use a "test, test and set" approach, and use pause, like this: acquire: lock bts [eax],0 ;Optimistic first attempt jnc l2 ;Success if acquired l1: pause test [eax],1 jne l1 ...


3

If it helps to you, let me put my grain of sand: 1) Critical Section= Kernel object used for allowing the execution of just one active thread from many others within one process. The other non selected threads are put to sleep. [No interprocess capability, very primitive object]. 2) Mutex Semaphore (aka Mutex)= Kernel object used for allowing the ...


3

Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 SP1 and higher seem to do support OMP_WAIT_POLICY as seen in this Knowledge base article setting OMP_WAIT_POLICY to PASSIVE does fix the issue for me when compiling with Visual Studio 2013.


3

It's range-based for. t has type std::thread&.


2

It's a range-based for loop. These were introduced with C++11. You are iterating over a container. Its syntax is: for ( range_declaration : range_expression ) loop_statement The for loop is executed from the beginning of the container to the end.


2

Overall it is correct. Since you used 'std::memory_order_relaxed' in the test_and_set function then without the 'atomic_thread_fence' call there is nothing that would prevent reordering of operations done before and after the Mutex::lock. Since it is expected that 'Mutex::lock' acts as a memory barrier then the call to 'atomic_thread_fence' becomes ...


2

There are 2 problems with your code: Use Linux kernel macro for your code. http://makelinux.com/ldd3/chp-11-sect-5 . Just add struct list_head as element to your struct values_list and use list_entry, list_add and other Netfilter hools are run in softirq context, so you must use spin_lock_irqsave and spin_unlock_irqrestore. This is most likely reason why ...


2

Whenever there is a critical section (CS) that can be run in interrupt context, you use a spinlock to protect it, it does not matter if the CS is shared between interrupt handler and a process or between interrupt handlers. The reson why you do not use semaphore or mutex is obvious, because you can't sleep in interrupt context.


2

First of all you would have to specify the address of a register, the value of which you are comparing and swapping with. This can be done with either of the following: CAS(int* reg, int oldValue, int newValue) or reg.CAS(int oldValue, int newValue) Assuming your line now would be: i = i.CAS(i, i+1) Imagine two threads calling waitBarrier() at the ...


1

Blockquote BUG: spinlock lockup suspected on CPU#0, sh/11786 This indicates the CPU0 is lockup, and the thread/Process would be sh (or start by sh, I am not sure). You should have a look at the stack strace info dumped by the kernel. For example: 127|uid=0 gid=1007@nutshell:/var # [ 172.285647] BUG: spinlock lockup on CPU#0, swapper/0, 983482f0 [ ...


1

When two threads are involved, spinlocks may be effective because of the probability that while one thread is waiting, the other thread releases the lock. You are thus correct that there are no guarantees, and a lot of probability is involved. As a result, you wait for locks with a spinlock only with locks that are held for a very short period of time. ...


1

In fire_timer() you call spin_unlock_irqrestore(&spinlock,flags); twice while only having called spin_lock_irqsave() once.


1

Your code is fine, but if you're looking for high performance I'd suggest this instead: xor ecx, ecx .loop: lock xchg [eax], ecx test ecx, ecx jz .loop Reasons: xor ecx, ecx is smaller and doesn't require a literal, and modern CPUs have this hardwired to fast register zero. test ecx, ecx can be marginally smaller and faster than cmp ecx, 0, ...


1

Interrupt handlers are nonpreemptible and non-reentrant, hence there is no scope of concurrent access to data.


1

I would do some investigation into topics like "Critical Section", "Mutex", "Semaphore", "I/O Completion Ports" and think about mechanisms for posting waiting threads.


1

The confusion is because you looking everything from "process context" only and totally forget Intr context, premption http://www.makelinux.net/ldd3/chp-5-sect


1

If data is shared between top half and bottom half then go for lock. Simple rules for locking. Locks meant to protect data not code. 1. What to protect?. 2. Why to protect? 3. How to protect.


1

If you attempt to lock a spin lock from the thread that already owns it, you will deadlock. Spin locks are not recursive. You should either look at pthread recursive mutexes, or change your design to avoid having to lock recursively.


1

If a spinlock is held in the process context. What will happen if the same spinlock is required in an interrupt context? In short, this is a bad design and will lead to deadlock. That's why there are APIs spin_lock_irq/spin_lock_irqsave that disable the interrupts before acquiring such locks and avoids such contentions.


1

The usual pattern is to use test_and_set(memory_order_acquire) and clear(memory_order_release). But I suspect you know that already. According to the standard section 29.8 [atomic.fences] (2): A release fence A synchronizes with an acquire fence B if there exist atomic operations X and Y, both operating on some atomic object M, such that A is ...


1

A code will benefit from using MCS lock when there's a high locks contention, i.e., many threads attempting to acquire a lock simultaneously. When using a simple spin lock, all threads are polling a single shared variable, whereas MCS forms a queue of waiting threads, such that each thread is polling on its predecessor in the queue. Hence cache coherency is ...


1

Example: int an_array[]={1,2,3,5,6,56,34,65,3,234}; for(int a : an_array) cout << a; this for loop is equivalent to: for(int index = 0; index < sizeof(an_array) / sizeof(an_array[0]) /*10*/; ++index) cout << an_array[index]; The supporting compilers do understand what vector is, if used against a range-based for loop, and they ...


1

Your SpinLock class seems to have its own instance, Not sure what your intention is, but that leads to infinite creation of SpinLock instance which exploits all the stack memory and thus leads to StackoverflowException. I suggest you to give a different name for your class as SpinLock is already taken by BCL.


1

there are different versions of spinlock: spin_lock_irqsave(&xxx_lock, flags); ... critical section here .. spin_unlock_irqrestore(&xxx_lock, flags); In Uni processor spin_lock_irqsave() should be used when data needs to shared between process context and interrupt context, as in this case IRQ also gets disables. spin_lock_irqsave()work ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible