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NO, they are completely different constructs: Code 1 @Controller @RequestMapping(value = "/users") public class UserController { @RequestMapping(params = "register") public String createForm(Model model) { model.addAttribute("user", new Customer()); return "user/register"; } } In this case, createForm method will be called ...


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Assuming you have a request instance of class: public class UserRequest { // --> NOTICE THE ANNOTATION HERE <-- @UniqueEmail(message = "email already registered") private final String email; public UserRequest(String email) { this.email = email; } public String getEmail() { return email; } } You have to ...


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I would try changing your annotation to: @RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.POST, produces=MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON_VALUE) And make sure you have Jackson (which Spring uses for JSON serialization) properly on your path. Also, make sure your Upload class is serializable, e.g. is not private or anything like that. If it is just a normal Java bean type ...


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For starters, the cassandra-unit example is unfortunately not really a good example since it leads to issues just like you encountered. When I remove the @TestExecutionListeners annotation in MyTest the test finishes as expected, but leaving that annotation makes the unittest fail on the assertNotNull. What is happening? When you declare ...


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The easiest way: Use extra parameter like ?api_key=39802830831bed188884e193d8465226 and compare if the provided value matches one of the allowed values in database. For security concerns you should use https.


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EDIT: After revealing your messaging technology and Spring configuration for it, simplest way for you is to configure SyncTaskExecutor (or Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1) would do the job also) as executor for your DefaultMessageListenerContainer. Use this method. You can register Task executor as separate bean (via @Bean annotation) and autowire it to ...



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