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6

When the instance is created, the initialization expression's value will be assigned to the field. When the AutowiredBeanPostProcessor processes the field it will assign a new value to it. You'd write code like this if you expected to run the same class outside the context of Spring.


4

Probably your destinationField is getting there in a null form, because otherwise, if the problem was the dest[i] you would have a nullpointer in the line System.out.println(dest[i]);. Try this: JComboBox<String> destinationField = new JComboBox<>(); Your reference destinationField was not pointing to a real object in memory, so when you ...


3

Fundamentally I think you've missed what the assignment operator does. This statement: b = doSomething(); changes the value of b to whatever the doSomething() method returns. It doesn't depend on the existing value of b at all. So similarly, when you have: A a = new A(); a = doSomthing(); ... it would make more sense to write: A a = doSomething(); ...


2

If your code really depends on a System property, I would recommend refactoring it to depend on the Spring Environment instead. Then you can use (with Spring Boot anyway) @IntegrationTest on your Spring test, e.g. (from the docs): @RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class) @SpringApplicationConfiguration(classes = MyApplication.class) ...


1

You can follow either of below mentioned approaches: You can pass the access token from the app to the server and using the graph API, get the user details including user id, email ,etc. Once you get this information you can link it to your data. Using the access token in the app itself and calling the graph API from the app, get the user details and then ...


1

Servlet containers have rules for how they map and handle URI requests. These can be found in the Servlet Specification. It's also important to note that most Servlet containers have a Servlet to handle JSPs, mapped to *.jsp, which is an extension mapping. Tomcat has a JspServlet to do this. You've mapped your DispatcherServlet to ...


1

If you want to retrieve the cached object, then the following code should work public ClientDTO getCachedClient() { Cache cache = cacheManager.getCache("client"); Object cachedObject = null; Object nativeCache = cache.getNativeCache(); if (nativeCache instanceof net.sf.ehcache.Ehcache) { net.sf.ehcache.Ehcache ...


1

"Receive a data stream" is a technical solution for your scenario, but not the scenario itself. So I can't answer that question. A controller is only needed for incoming requests. In your case the client would subscribe to a topic and the server publishes data. In order to do that you register a broker as described in 20.4.2 Enable STOMP over WebSocket. ...


1

You can use this answer to obtain a list of your entity classes: List<ClassLoader> classLoadersList = new LinkedList<ClassLoader>(); classLoadersList.add(ClasspathHelper.contextClassLoader()); classLoadersList.add(ClasspathHelper.staticClassLoader()); reflections = new Reflections( new ConfigurationBuilder() ...


1

You could try declaring a suitable bean in web-app/WEB-INF/applicationContext.xml, which is the definition of the root web application context as opposed to the GrailsApplication's internal context. <bean id="initConfig" class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.MethodInvokingFactoryBean"> <property name="targetClass" ...


1

There is a way to do this if you'll move from Spring MVC validators to Hibernate. It's not a big deal because Hibernate validators work well with Spring Validator interface (also you may be interested in SmartValidator intreface which supports groups). After that you can specify @NotNull annotation on the date field. In properties file just add ...


1

OSGI is such kind of technology which you can have multiple versions of same library in one JVM runtime. However, it's overkilled for most of cases. Same suggestion as others, upgrading your source code would be much cheaper way.


1

You could upload image in folder outside the project. I useful for several image try { byte[] bytes = file.getBytes(); // Creating the directory to store file File dir = new File(Utils.getFolderStoreImage(request.getSession().getServletContext().getRealPath("/"))); if (!dir.exists()) ...


1

You can try using gvNIX framework (based on Spring-roo) that implements functionalities to works easily with jasper reports and other interesting functionalities. Visit the following links to learn more about gvNIX framework: http://github.com/disid/gvnix http://code.google.com/p/gvnix/ And here you have an example about how to implement an application ...


1

Don't allow multiple logins. You can easily achieve this using spring security. Add concurrent-session-control to spring security. <concurrent-session-control max-sessions="1" exception-if-maximum-exceeded="false" expired-url="/jsp/invalidate.do"/> //you can also set expired-url to your custom invalidate page rather than create a mapping Create ...


1

Add the import statement import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PathVariable;


1

You can define your queries in XML as spring beans: <bean id="exampleQuerySql" class="java.lang.String"> <constructor-arg> <value> <![CDATA[ select * from foo where whatever_ind = 'A' ]]> </value> </constructor-arg> </bean> Using CDATA the query text can include newlines, ...


1

Yes, you can put them in a properties file, and use properties placeholders ${...} to resolve them, or you can use SpEL... "#{myQueryBean.queryOne}" where myQueryBean is a <bean/> that's an instance of a class with a method... public String getQueryOne() {...} or a static constant on a class... "#{T(foo.Queries).QUERY_ONE}" public static final ...


1

Don't confuse javax @WebService with Spring @Service which is defined here. Although both are called service. @Service's purpose is simply: This annotation serves as a specialization of @Component, allowing for implementation classes to be autodetected through classpath scanning. So, since @WebService is for WSDLs (external access), a @Serviceis for ...


1

I don't think it can be called by using @service you need to annotate the class with @Webservice to expose it to the outside world


1

Annotation @Service is only a special version of @Component annotation and its purpose is not providing a remote access to implementation. As mentioned in documentation, @Service annotation helps the class to be auto detected during the classpath scanning (see the JavaDoc) and processed by some tools. Also check the explanation on Spring's forum.


1

No, it's not posible, java can't know when new Country("BE") are equal to countryDao.getByCode("BE"), because, there are not equals, one is managed by Hibernate and the other is managed by you. You don't give the new Country("BE") to Hibernate, so it can not be the same, also, went you invoke the new Countru("BE"), the code is null, and the code of ...


1

I think, I figured it out - there is a WS support dependency: <dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.ws</groupId> <artifactId>spring-ws-support</artifactId> <version>2.1.4.RELEASE</version> </dependency>



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