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2

Since you didn't provide a runnable example, I created one to show how to properly code a Swing application. First, you must start a Swing application with the SwingUtilities.invokeLater method. Here's how I started the CircleSprite class. public static void main(String[] args) { SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new CircleSprite()); } Second, you should ...


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Almost sound theory. You are only checking if the player rectangle position is exactly the same as the boundary of the tree rectangle position. That will rarely be the case. You need to check for the player being in between the tree's boundaries as well, more like this: # check if player is overlapping the tree if tree.rect.x <= self.player.rect.x <= ...


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I had this exact same issue, with the vertical lines appearing between my tiles when I was moving. To solve this, I used to following code: public static void fixBleeding(TextureRegion[][] region) { for (TextureRegion[] array : region) { for (TextureRegion texture : array) { fixBleeding(texture); } } } public static void ...


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Are you using pygame? If so, there is the built in colliderect function (documentation here). If not: Here's a relatively in depth discussion, designed with platform games in mind. This is just the barebones 2-d collision detection for axis aligned (i.e. not rotated) rectangles Keep in mind that objects moving very quickly can make collision detection ...


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Here's some more in-depth example, that should help you out with building that system up (the previous answer has some a mistake) local cards = ...


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could be that you have to first put cam.setToOrtho(true, 136, gameHeight);before the batch, so I can not confirm hopefully help public GameRenderer(int gameHeight) { this.gameHeight = gameHeight; cam = new OrthographicCamera(); batch = new SpriteBatch(); cam.setToOrtho(true, 136, ...


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A common technique used in games to get a random object from a collection is to use a random generated number like math.random and then use the modulo operator % to get a number from 0 to number of objects. For example lets say you have a list of cards: local cards = {"one","two","three","four","five"}; local numCards = #cards; If you want to randomly ...


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If you are going to add a lot of objects to the arraylist, use a 2D physics engine to do all the work for you. If you want to continue implementing your own functions, the very basic method to do is to implement a nested loop over the list to check every possible pair in the arraylist. The complexity is O(n^2) for(int i=0; i<ball.size();i++) { ...


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Something like this should work. sf::Image image; image.LoadFromFile("bohater.png"); image.CreateMaskFromColor(sf::Color::White); sf::Texture texBohatera; texBohatera.LoadFromImage(image); sf::Sprite bohater; bohater.SetTexture(texture); (Disclaimer, I didn't test it because I don't want to install SFML)


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It is not recommended to directly load a sprite. When a context loss occurs on Android, it will free the memory that was occupied with your loaded assets. Therefore directly accessing your assets after a context loss would immediately crash a resumed application. To prevent the above issue you should use an AssetManager which loads and stores assets like ...


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Depends on whether you have obstacles or not, i.e. what the definition of "In the Area" means and also home many sprites you are dealing with. If there's not many sprites and the distance calc is fast then brute force is probably ok. for sprite in sprites: if something.distance(sprite) < THRESHOLD: do_something_with_near_sprite(sprite) If ...


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The constructor of the Rectangle class requires x, y, width, height But you are supplying coordinates of opposite corners to it. Replace // Rectangle of Player playerRect = new Rectangle(player.getxPos(), player.getyPos(), player .getSprite().getWidth() + player.getxPos(), player.getSprite() .getHeight() + player.getyPos()); // Rectangle ...


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I suspect @Bergi has it just right. I did the following quick perf test drawing a sprite 10000 times using canvas-frames and then using clips from a spritesheet. On my machine (win8/2GHz/4Core), clipping from a spritesheet was always faster, but both canvas-frames and spritesheet-clipping occurred so quickly that there was no significant rendering speed ...


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I somehow tried to inverse the image and use the COLOR_DODGE blend mode which is available in pixi and it worked. This is a just very lucky. The effect is not 100% equal, but very close and good enough in this case.


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You can insert a Q.UI.Text object into a sprite like this: var Q = Quintus() .include('Sprites, Scenes, UI') .setup({ maximize: true }) Q.Sprite.extend('LabelSprite', { init: function(p) { this._super(p, {text: 'default text'}); } }); Q.scene("level1",function(stage) { var label_sprite = stage.insert(new Q.LabelSprite({ ...



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