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In MySQL, you should use CONCAT() instead of +: select * from TableName where column_b not like CONCAT(column_a,'%') In SQL Server: select * from TableName where column_b not like column_a+'%'


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You have the right idea, but MySQL doesn't support the + operator for string concatination, only for mathematical addition. Instead, just use the concat function: SELECT * FROM table_name WHERE column_b NOT LIKE CONCAT(column_a, '%')


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Solution: SELECT * FROM user WHERE TRIM("first_name") || ' ' || TRIM("last_name") LIKE '%clark kent%'; Per the OP's comments, the difficulty was that first_name and last_name were CHAR and not VARCHAR fields, meaning that the fields are space-padded to their length. That is, the string 'clark' stored as CHAR(8) is 'clark[sp][sp][sp]'. When ...


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I would go for the normalized approach. So, a second table, along the lines of: CREATE TABLE EventDays ( EventID int not null, /* Or whatever the PK is for Events */ DayOfWeek tinyint not null, constraint CK_EventDays_DayOfWeek CHECK (DayOfWeek between 0 and 6), constraint PK_EventDays PRIMARY KEY (EventID,DayOfWeek), constraint ...


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Maybe a little too late, but a workaround to this is to qualify the field before the LIKE with double quotes like below: SELECT * FROM natperson WHERE "NAME" LIKE ?


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Try SELECT * FROM table_name WHERE column_b NOT LIKE CONCAT(column_a,'%') or SELECT * FROM table_name WHERE column_b LIKE CONCAT('%', column_a, '%')



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