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28

I was able to get the full text (99,208 chars) out of a NVARCHAR(MAX) column by selecting (Results To Grid) just that column and then right-clicking on it and then saving the result as a CSV file. Funny enough, when I tried to run the same query, but having Results to File enabled, the output was truncated using the Results to Text limit. The work-around ...


26

There are various situations where you cannot avoid CROSS APPLY or OUTER APPLY. Consider you have two tables. MASTER TABLE x------x--------------------x | Id | Name | x------x--------------------x | 1 | A | | 2 | B | | 3 | C | x------x--------------------x DETAILS TABLE ...


21

Turn on Client Statistics by doing one of the following: Menu: Query > Include client Statistics Toolbar: Click the button (next to Include Actual Execution Time) Keyboard: Shift-Alt-S Then you get a new tab which records the timings, IO data and rowcounts etc for (up to) the last 10 exections (plus averages!):


17

As mentioned in other answers, all of the following will work for the standard string-based syntax. WAITFOR DELAY '02:00' --Two hours WAITFOR DELAY '00:02' --Two minutes WAITFOR DELAY '00:00:02' --Two seconds WAITFOR DELAY '00:00:00.200' --Two tenths of a seconds There is also an alternative method of passing it a DATETIME value. You might think I'm ...


12

Time is not stored with it's display format in SQL Server. therefor, from the user perspective, you can say that it has no format. of course, that's not completely accurate since it does have a storage format, but as an average user you can't really use it. This is true for all date and time data types: (Date, DateTimeOffset, DateTime2, SmallDateTime, ...


12

You can think of it like this. SELECT TOP N without ORDER BY returns some N rows, neither first, nor last, just some. Which rows it returns is not defined. You can run the same statement 10 times and get 10 different sets of rows each time. So, if the server had a syntax SELECT LAST N, then result of this statement without ORDER BY would again be ...


12

In SQL Server a SELECT without a FROM clause works as though it operates against a single row table. This is not standard SQL. Other RDBMSs provide a utility DUAL table with a single row. So this would be treated effectively the same as SELECT COUNT(*) AS LargeTable FROM DUAL A related Connect Item discussing SELECT 'test' WHERE EXISTS (SELECT *) ...


11

With CROSS APPLY select ParsedData.* from MyTable mt cross apply ( select str = mt.String + ',,' ) f1 cross apply ( select p1 = charindex( ',', str ) ) ap1 cross apply ( select p2 = charindex( ',', str, p1 + 1 ) ) ap2 cross apply ( select Nmame = substring( str, 1, p1-1 ) , Surname = substring( str, p1+1, p2-p1-1 ) ...


10

Here is a complete version of Jeremy's Aug 2011 query with the changes suggested by Brad (Oct 2011) and iw.kuchin (May 2012) incorporated: Brad: Correct [ObjectType] and [ObjectName] for schemas. iw.kuchin: For [ObjectType] it's better to use obj.type_desc only for OBJECT_OR_COLUMN permission class. For all other cases use perm.[class_desc]. iw.kuchin: ...


10

Using a combination of ROUND, EXP, SUM and LOG SELECT ROUND(EXP(SUM(LOG([Col A]))),1) FROM yourtable SQL FIDDLE: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!3/d43c8/2/0 Explanation LOG returns the logarithm of col a ex. LOG([Col A]) which returns 0 0.6931471805599453 1.0986122886681098 1.3862943611198906 Then you use SUM to Add them all together SUM(LOG([Col A])) which ...


10

MSSQL's datetime data type has a finest granularity of .00333333s (repeating), or roughly 3 milliseconds. Changes less than that will result in either no change, or rounded to 3. From https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc280460.aspx datetime2(3) has a precision of one millisecond, and datetime has a precision of 1/300 of a second.


9

Try this, SELECT ID FROM MyTable WHERE @input BETWEEN MinValue AND MaxValue. Or flip the equality signs in your statement. SELECT ID FROM MyTable WHERE MinValue <= @input AND MaxValue >= @input


9

The simplest method is: on cast(t.dateoccurred as date) = t2.otherdate This could use an index on the first table (see Martin Smith's comment). It can definitely take advantage of an index on the second table. The following version could also use an index on the first table but not the second: on t.dateocurred >= t2.otherdate and t.dateoccurred ...


9

This is certainly a bug in the product. A similar bug was already reported and closed as "Won't Fix" For the query WITH Test AS ( SELECT 12 AS PropertyID, $350000 AS Ap1, 350000 AS Ap2 ) SELECT LP.* FROM Test T OUTER APPLY dbo.TVFTest ( T.PropertyID, T.Ap1, T.Ap2 ) LP; The execution plan looks like ...


9

First, we choose stable (not static) data columns to form a Primary Key, precisely because updating Keys in a Relational database (in which the references are by Key) is something we wish to avoid. For this issue, it doesn't matter if the Key is a Relational Key ("made up from the data"), and thus has Relational Integrity, Power, and Speed, or if the "key" ...


9

I would use like 'Express Edition%' Example: DECLARE @edition varchar(50); set @edition = cast((select SERVERPROPERTY ('edition')) as varchar) DECLARE @isExpress bit if @edition like 'Express Edition%' set @isExpress = 1; else set @isExpress = 0; print @isExpress


8

Import: You must write columns in INSERT statement INSERT INTO TABLE SELECT * FROM Is not correct. Insert into Table(Field1,...) Select (Field1,...) from TABLE Is correct


8

You can select imaginary values, by using the VALUES keyword. Some JOINs will then generate lots and lots of combinations (can be extended to create hundreds of thousands of rows). Your numbers (from 1000 to 1050): SELECT ones.n + 10*tens.n + 1000 FROM (VALUES(0),(1),(2),(3),(4),(5),(6),(7),(8),(9)) ones(n), (VALUES(0),(1),(2),(3),(4),(5) ...


8

Try: DECLARE @t TABLE ( ID INT , wac DECIMAL(30, 10) , item CHAR(1) ) DECLARE @b TABLE ( item CHAR(1) , baseline DECIMAL(30, 10) ) INSERT INTO @t VALUES ( 1, 2.31, 'A' ), ( 2, 1.10, 'A' ), ( 3, 2.13, 'A' ), ( 4, 1.34, 'A' ) INSERT INTO @b VALUES ( 'A', 10 ); WITH ordercte ...


8

The issue is that your input parameter has an int type - but needs to be a string type: [dbo].[GimmeThatPhoneNumber] ( @username int ) @username should be: @username nvarchar(200) --pick an appropriate size


8

You're variables are declared as varchar. That's a single character, so in the first query you're comparing with 'R'. You probably meant to use something like varchar(100)...


8

That is because it is not valid SQL to start with an if (If you mean to use T-SQL it is, but then you have to write the entire if statement) I think a simple case is what you need: select case when exists (select * from T_TicketGroupsToChangePrice where SubTypeId = @SubTypeId and DateId = @dateId and UserId = @userId) then 1 else 0 ...


8

You can use a check constraint with the binary_checksum function for this: alter table student add check (binary_checksum(email) = binary_checksum(lower(email))); You can also use multiple conditions in the check, so you could also check that the email-address contains a @ character and so on, although processing demand would increase: check ...


8

Use ISO standard date formats, so you know what date you are getting. Either: select datename(dw, '2011-04-11') or select datename(dw, '2011-11-04') (Or, because the above formats are subject to one internationalization setting where they can be misinterpreted, you can leave out the hyphens so they are unambiguously in the YYYYMMDD format.) Also, ...


8

SELECT LEFT(NAME+'******',6) FROM TABLE


8

You can use LEFT to get leading text and compare with zeros string: DECLARE @number INT = 3; SELECT * FROM your_table WHERE LEFT(column_name, @number) = REPLICATE('0', @number) -- AND SUBSTRING(col, @number+1,1) <> '0'; If you need exact number of leading zeros LiveDemo Or when you need a flag: SELECT *, [has_3_leading_zeros] = CASE ...


7

You can use in: SELECT * FROM testing WHERE 'foo' in (col1, col2, col3, . . . );


7

SQL is a set based language and loops should be a last resort. So the set based approach would be to first generate all the dates you require and insert them in one go, rather than looping and inserting one at a time. Aaron Bertrand has written a great series on generating a set or sequence without loops: Generate a set or sequence without loops – part 1 ...


7

That's jut matter of definition what is an occurrence and how do you deal with overlapping instances. That's exactly how I would expect it to work, since handling the data one occurrence at the time means that 'xAxAxAx' is xAx + A + xAx -- and whatever is the result of the first replaced isn't being considered as a new occurrence, therefore those 2 get ...


7

;WITH CTE AS ( SELECT TOP 30 * FROM TableName WHERE F01 = 1 AND F02 = 1 ORDER BY NEWID() ) UPDATE CTE SET ColumnName = 'NewValue' OR UPDATE t SET t.ColumnName = 'NewValue' FROM ( SELECT TOP 30 * FROM TableName WHERE F01 = 1 AND F02 = 1 ORDER BY NEWID() )t Edit If you want the updated row IDs once the randomly selected ...



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