New answers tagged

0

You could alias one of the duplicate column names in your query so that the result set returned by the stored procedure doesn't have the duplicate column name problem


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Field is overloaded to accept column index as well, you could use pass an index in this case. dataTable.Rows[i].Field<string>(2);


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Just for fun, I pasted the JSON into https://jsonformatter.curiousconcept.com/ it came up with an error in the format. You seem to be getting a crlf at character 2033. Once removed the JSON formats correctly. I don't have 2016 (seriously jealous), but I can't imagine where or why it wouldn't return a single string ..."physical_ name":"C:\\Program ...


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If you used Excel to save your CSV file then make sure that you have saved it as “CSV (MS-DOS)” not as “CSV (Macintosh)”. If the CSV file is the correct CSV file format then you can try to use a format file for the Bulk load. The format file for you CSV should look as follow: 9.0 3 1 SQLINT 0 4 "," 1 SID "" 2 SQLINT 0 4 "," 2 LID ...


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Here how I used Mike's function above: SELECT TOP 1 [State], [City], [AddressID], sqrt(square(abs(la.Latitude-@lat)) + square(abs(la.Longitude-@lng))) as Distance FROM [LocationAddresses] la ORDER BY Distance


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ARRAYT in my table TEST is varchar(250) because I think is good to have phone Numbers as varchar right ? Or should I use bigint


1

Not to be considered an answer. Just a minor tweak to Felix. In his lag, he had the default set to 0. So in the first observation the rating difference is +.0005. IMHO, a new rating is not a change (It is a factor in Rate-Volume-Variance Reporting) The only change I made to Felix's query was >>>LAG(CustRating, 1, CustRating)<<< Declare ...


0

When you put something like max(column) in a SQL query, the max function is operating on a set of values of column from a group. If you've defined your query with a group by, such that the results are grouped, then every column (other than the one on which you are grouping) has multiple values. In your case, location has one value (it's what you're ...


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There isn't a SqlDbType that maps properly between VARBINARY(MAX) and byte[]. But actually that is OK, because the parameterisation infrastructure just handles this for you, the following code will just work: var binary = new bytes[1]; var command = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO [MyTable]([BinaryColumn]) VALUES (@binary)"); ...


1

You can use the LAG function instead: Accesses data from a previous row in the same result set without the use of a self-join in SQL Server 2016. LAG provides access to a row at a given physical offset that comes before the current row. Use this analytic function in a SELECT statement to compare values in the current row with values in a previous row ...


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Create POCO class in EF 7 code first Basically they are same question. The key issue is to create the correct POCO class.


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Not sure what exactly you want to do about your sql, you should only fetch columns which appears in GROUP BY or the other column in an aggregate function, anyway try this please;) left join ( SELECT my_number, id FROM table1 T1, (SELECT location, MAX(id) as id FROM table1 GROUP BY location) TMP ...


1

Assume you have this SP: DECLARE @Value1 ... @Value2 ... ... @File VARBINARY(MAX) INSERT INTO [YourTable] (Column1, Column2, ..., File) VALUES (@Value1, @Value2, ..., @File) Use this syntax to convert the file to byte array and directly insert byte array as varbinary data: using System.Data.SqlClient; using System.IO; byte[] data; using (FileStream fs ...


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Not sure if this would improve performance, but I'm assuming this is a scalar and only needs to be resolved once. Declare @categoryID varchar(100) Set @categoryID = dbo.function_get_category_id('category config key') SELECT * FROM table WHERE table.id = XX AND table.categoryId = @categoryID


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You could omit the use of temporary table and delete then select into your permanent table directly: USE [DATABASE1] GO SET ANSI_NULLS ON GO SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON GO ALTER PROCEDURE [DATABASE1].[sp_usertable] ( @in_params AS XML ) AS BEGIN DROP TABLE dbo.usertable; select T.x.value('./Name[1]','varchar(25)') as [Name] , ...


1

Sometimes (depending on the business requirements) the way I handle this is to create a unique index on the table, comprised of the columns you want to use to ensure uniqueness, and set the Ignore Duplicates (or it might be ignore_dup_key) option to true. This way you're letting SQL Server detect the duplicates and it simply ignores them without issuing any ...


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SQL Server Express with Advance Tool Service doesn't contain SSAS and SSIS Check it here You can use Developer Edition which is free from now on.


1

You can make use of SQL Server Table Type Parameter. Create a Type first in SQL Server CREATE TYPE [dbo].[TVP_Units] AS TABLE( [Units] VARCHAR(1000) ) GO Make Your Stored procedure accept a variable of that type instead of a Varchar(1000) @Units variable. ALTER PROCEDURE MyProc @TVP_Units [dbo].[TVP_Units] READONLY , @BegDate datetime , @EndDate ...


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You have instantiated a CRecordset but are not using it. SQL is fine for quick and dirty but as you want to do more complicated things it can be hard to manage. Even using CRecordset directly can be restrictive. Derive from CRecordset, like: header: class MyRecordset : public CRecordset { DECLARE_DYNAMIC(MyRecordset ) public: MyRecordset ( ...


1

Update your query to use paramaters and pass the byte array as a paramater directly to the table eg SQL: insert into table values (@data); C# SqlComman com = new SqlCommand("insert into table values (@data);",Database Connection); com.Paramaters.Add(new SqlParameter("@Data" Byte array)); com.executeNonQuery();


1

You basically need an Instead of trigger. The code would look something like... CREATE TRIGGER tr_Insert_MyTable ON MyTable INSTEAD OF INSERT AS BEGIN SET NOCOUNT ON; INSERT INTO MyTable ([CustomerName], [CustomerStatus], [CustomerType], [OtherFields]) SELECT [CustomerName] , [CustomerStatus] * 2 AS [CustomerStatus] ,'B' [CustomerType] , ...


0

OK I'm posting this as another answer to keep it cleaner. Now that we've discovered that you have some truly ugly and inconsistent data, it requires some ugly and non-elegant code. (For this I apologize) Here is my suggestion. 1) Add a dedicated UDF to scrub and reformat the NOTE data 2) Keep the Parser UDF as is (you may find other uses) 3) Run the query ...


4

The Maximum number of rows you can insert in one statement is 1000 when using INSERT INTO ... VALUES... i.e. INSERT INTO TableName( Colum1) VALUES (1), (2), (3),...... upto 1000 rows. But if your are using a SELECT statement to insert rows in a table, there is no limit for that, something like... INSERT INTO TableName (ColName) Select Col ...


0

Try - catch is good but not enough. You need to locate offensive rows. begin try insert... select... end try begin catch declare @badFK nvarchar(max) select @badFK = (select fk_field from fk_table f left join pk_table p on p.pk_field = f.fk_field where p.pk_field is null for xml auto,elements,root) --raiserror as @vasmi recommend but include @badFK into ...


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Try the following. BEGIN TRY BEGIN --Do your update here SELECT @@ROWCOUNT END END TRY BEGIN CATCH BEGIN DECLARE @ErrorMessage NVARCHAR(4000); DECLARE @ErrorSeverity INT; DECLARE @ErrorState INT; SELECT ...


0

Try using EXCEPT. SELECT COUNT(ID) from [maintable] EXCEPT SELECT COUNT(ID) from [maintable] WHERE status1 = 'YES' and status2 = 'YES' and status3 = 'YES'


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Check if there is transaction and then rollback. Try the following code instead. Begin Begin Try declare @counter int=0 --demo condition while(@counter<10) begin Begin Transaction [Tran] set @counter = @counter +1; commit transaction [Tran] end -- While End end try Begin Catch IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0 BEGIN print 'in ...


0

All great comments so far. I would just add that you can view the data in Notepad++ and get a much better appreciation for what you are dealing with. Notepad++ will actually 'show' you the characters for line feeds and carriage returns and the like. Take a look at the data. You may see something very interesting in there.


0

You only have begin transaction once, whereas you are committing each time your loop runs.


0

Using the approach of this answer to run a query during migration: http://stackoverflow.com/a/30373394/84206 using (var dc = new DbContext("your connection string or name")) { string edition = dc.Database.SqlQuery<string>("SELECT SERVERPROPERTY('edition')").Single(); if(edition == "Enterprise") { //... } else { ...


1

you've got a quoting issue in your print statement DECLARE @var1 VARCHAR(50) SET @var1 = '1' IF(ISNUMERIC(@var1) = 1) BEGIN PRINT 'It is numeric' END


0

If the data (last two fields) are of fixed length: SELECT LEFT(RIGHT('DI:TIER1:VQ:SPI:H:SID005000009MTED0:FDCADIND:PS',11),8)


0

This happens when record.RESORT and/or record.FORMATTED_AMOUNT is null. See here for a similar issue.


0

No need for a loop... Try it like this CREATE TABLE #tbl (ID INT,SomeColumn VARCHAR(100),YourXMLasString NVARCHAR(MAX)); INSERT INTO #tbl VALUES (1,'Test 11','<root><id>100</id><more>abc</more></root>') ,(2,'Test 12','<root><id>100</id><more>abc</more></root>') ,(3,'Test ...


0

Have you attached a SQL Profiler? What is the query which is sent to the SQL Server? The code (in general) looks correct. The error message implies that "@val" is not provided, but the code you are showing is adding it. It could be that record.FORMATTED_AMOUNT is null or has some other problem which causes the parameter not to be added, but this should ...


0

Here is a way I solved this problem as well. Thanks to @StackNewUser for help in getting this figured out. USE [ImpactPro90] BEGIN SET NOCOUNT ON; DECLARE @table_name SYSNAME DECLARE @table_part SYSNAME DECLARE comp_cursor cursor FOR SELECT TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES WHERE TABLE_TYPE = 'BASE TABLE' AND TABLE_NAME LIKE ...


0

Firstly, you could get the column names which have more than one data type using GROUP BY and HAVING: SELECT COLUMN_NAME FROM tablecolumns GROUP BY COLUMN_NAME HAVING count(DISTINCT DATA_TYPE) > 1 Then, you could display all the rows where their columns name lies within that result using WHERE IN(..) SELECT COLUMN_NAME, DATA_TYPE FROM tablecolumns ...


0

Assuming (per the question) the substring that has to be extracted is 9 characters in length. select reverse(substring(reverse(col),charindex(':',reverse(col))+1,9)) from tablename


0

Installed a new instance and made it default instance which is a crooked way. And now im able to use it as a usual database server with all new sa account and password. Is there any proven better way please add as answer.


0

If you have SQL Server 2008 or later you can use the COUNT() window function to achieve what you are looking for: WITH CTE_DistinctColumnsAndTypes AS ( SELECT COLUMN_NAME ,DATA_TYPE FROM tablecolumns GROUP BY COLUMN_NAME, DATA_TYPE ), CTE_ColumnsAndTypeCount AS ( SELECT COLUMN_NAME ,DATA_TYPE ...


0

Why do you NOT have access to Bulk Insert? I can't think of a reason that would be disabled on your version of SQL Server. I can think of a couple ways of doing the work. #1) Record a macro, using excel, to do everything from the data import, to the parsing of the data sets, and then to saving as a CSV file. I just did it; very easy. Then, use BULK ...


2

The mixing of types you have now is definitely a problem. If you want to display an empty string for a null date you need convert the date into a short date time string not a date. You can use the convert function to do that. The last parameter accepts a style code so you can have it display just the date part. COALESCE(CONVERT(varchar(8), ...


0

I found what I think will be a solution for your issue. In my test, I was able to create a clustered index on my windowing functions key values, which in your case would be Service_VisitID ASC,service_total_paid_amt desc. Try this code below, in my test the query was able to use the clustered index key to scan this: CREATE CLUSTERED INDEX ...


1

Here's a slightly different formulation that uses a CTE, which I generally find easier to read than a subquery (though of course, your mileage may vary). declare @Master table ( ID bigint, [user] varchar(16), Name varchar(16) ); declare @Scenario table ( ID bigint, ScenarioID bigint, [status] varchar(16) ); insert @Master values ...


0

Finally, I got the answer and want to share it out. First, I have to say that I put my question in a wrong way. What I really want is I have an application, and this application is connected with a database. However, I am allowed user to switch database. So, when the user switch to a new database I would like the application copy the entire database ...


1

If you have SQL Server 2008 or later you can use the ROW_NUMBER() function to achieve what you want. It will avoid querying the same table twice or performing joins. SELECT * FROM ( SELECT a.[user] ,a.ID ,a.Name ,b.status ,ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY a.ID ...


3

You can do this with a CROSS APPLY looking up the most recent for each value: Select M.ID, M.[User], M.Name, X.Status From [Master] M Cross Apply ( Select Top 1 S.Status From Scenario S Where S.ID = M.ID Order By S.ScenarioID Desc ) X Another way you could do it is with a ROW_NUMBER() PARTITIONED on the ID and ORDERED by ...


-1

All you would need is a singular salary table with either (Employee Id, Year, Month) OR (Employee Id, Date) You'll need to create some indexes on Employee ID and the date or year/month. This way you can create queries to either sum the entire year and get individual months without the need for separate tables. CREATE TABLE dbo.Salary ( fkEmployeeId ...


0

I tend to avoid floats for several reasons. This example being one How about SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR, CAST(32040.5742 AS DECIMAL(16,4))) Returns 32040.5742 Since you are going to varchar what about SELECT FORMAT(32040.5742, '#,##0.0000') Returns 32,040.5742


0

Declare @Table table (Date date,Room varchar(10),Occupents int) Insert into @Table (Date,Room,Occupents) values ('2016-05-11','100',2), ('2016-05-11','102',2), ('2016-05-12','102',1), ('2016-05-12','104',3), ('2016-05-12','105',1), ('2016-05-13','101',2) Select Date,Room From (Select Distinct Date from @Table) A Join (Select Distinct Room from @Table) B ...



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