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11

Opinion: Triggers are like hidden behaviour, unless you go looking for them you usually won't realise they are there. I also like to keep the DB as 'dumb' as possible when using EF, since I'm using EF so my team wont need to maintain SQL code. For my solution (mix of ASP.NET WebForms and MVC in C# with Business Logic in another project that also contains ...


8

Final conclusion: MySQL 5.5.30 is not buggy in this case, also there was no misconfiguration of the server itself. Several self-made mistakes caused the problem: Mistake I: DEFINER user did not exist Instead of just generating the database on the production machine, I was lazy and dumped the testing database to the production machine. If you don't ...


5

Try this: DELIMITER $$ CREATE TRIGGER occupy_trig AFTER INSERT ON `OccupiedRoom` FOR EACH ROW begin DECLARE id_exists Boolean; -- Check BookingRequest table SELECT 1 INTO @id_exists FROM BookingRequest WHERE BookingRequest.idRequest= NEW.idRequest; IF ...


5

You can anti semi join between sys.tables and sys.triggers. e.g. with NOT IN SELECT * FROM sys.tables WHERE object_id NOT IN (SELECT parent_id FROM sys.triggers WHERE is_disabled = 0) Or NOT EXISTS SELECT * FROM sys.tables t WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.triggers ...


4

Instruction: when you insert data into table, only 'inserted' has the new inserted rows; when you delete data from table, only 'deleted' has the deleted rows; when you update table, the 'inserted' saves the new rows, the 'deleted' saves the old rows. I think this sample can give you a hint. (SQL Server 2012) Sample: Sample Table Definition: create table ...


4

As for DateCreated, I would just add a default constraint on that column set to SYSDATETIME() that takes effect when inserting a new row into the table. For DateModified, personally, I would probably use triggers on those tables. In my opinion, the trigger approach: makes it easier; I don't have to worry about and remember every time I save an entity ...


4

With your requirements you don't need BEGIN END and IF with unnecessary SELECT in your trigger. So you can simplify it to this CREATE TRIGGER occupy_trig AFTER INSERT ON occupiedroom FOR EACH ROW UPDATE BookingRequest SET status = 1 WHERE idRequest = NEW.idRequest;


4

You can simply write your trigger like this, create or replace TRIGGER Customer_Up_Tr AFTER UPDATE OF cust_name, contact ON N_Customer FOR EACH ROW WHEN (OLD.contact <> 1 AND NEW.contact = 1 OR OLD.cust_name <> 1 AND NEW.cust_name = 1) BEGIN INSERT INTO customer_changelog (cust_no, cust_name, contact) VALUES ...


3

the "old" values are all set to NULL in the befor insert trigger. you have to use new.changedate : CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER TESTTRIGGER BEFORE INSERT ON TEST_INSERTTIMETRIGGER REFERENCING NEW AS NEW OLD AS OLD for each row BEGIN :new.changedate:=:new.changedate + 1/24; END;


3

This will generate the command how to drop all triggers in current schema: select 'drop trigger ' || trigger_name || ';' stmt from user_triggers;


3

The insert trigger is executed once per statement not once per inserted row. You have to rewrite the trigger so it handles the case where the pseudo table inserted has more than one row. Common SQL Server Mistakes - Multi Row DML Triggers


3

MySQL does not support INSTEAD OF trigger; that is, it's not possible to do this with a trigger. Assuming the id column is the PRIMARY KEY of the table (or at a minimum, a UNIQUE KEY on the table) you can use the ON DUPLICATE KEY form of the INSERT statement to achieve the behavior you describe. For example: INSERT INTO Warehouse (id, count) VALUES (1, ...


2

First Google hit for search query: Drop all triggers - Oracle BEGIN FOR i in (select trigger_name,owner from dba_triggers where trigger_name like '%_BI%' and owner = 'myTesting' ) LOOP EXECUTE IMMEDIATE 'DROP TRIGGER '||i.owner||'.'||i.trigger_name; END LOOP; END; If you really want to drop all the triggers ...


2

You can create a script for dropping triggers by using the Oracle system tables, like this: select 'drop trigger ' || owner || '.' || trigger_name || ';' from all_triggers Note that there are 3 views containing triggers: all_triggers = all the triggers you have permission to know about (regardless of which schema they belong to) user_triggers = the ...


2

A trigger is not a cronjob, you can also make something like : CREATE TRIGGER my_first_trigger BEFORE INSERT employees FOR EACH ROW BEGIN IF NEW.id_employee = 55 THEN INSERT INTO special_employees VALUES (NEW.id_employee, NEW.name); END IF; END $$ You juste have to adapt this phpmyadmin-mysql query. Note : I said phpmyadmin-mysql query because actually ...


2

As unbelievable as it sounds, in mysql you can't have a space between count and (*): select count(*) -- OK select count (*) -- syntax error! In your case, it's in the second subquery. Change it to: ... `CountDownLikes` = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM `Likes` WHERE `NewsIdn` = NEW.`NewsIdn` AND `Type` = 'down'), ... The same applies to cast(...), this is a ...


2

You are right that adding PRAGMA AUTONOMOUS_TRANSACTION is no solution. One way to do this is to maintain a count of people per group in the GROUPS table (if you don't have a GROUPS table then you could add one) using triggers on PEOPLE: After INSERT on PEOPLE: update GROUPS, add 1 to count of group they are in After DELETE on PEOPLE: update GROUPS, ...


2

Using SUM in a SELECT INTO statement is valid. But there are some other issues with your trigger: If you want to DECLARE a local variable you can't prefix it with an @-sign like it is required for session variables. The scope of a local variable is only inside the trigger and not globally for the current session as it is for session variables. It is good ...


2

The problem is this bit 'New task created: ' + :new.title I'm assuming that your goal is to concatenate the :new.title to the string 'New task created: '. The string concatentation operator in PL/SQL is not +, however, it is ||. + only works to add two numbers. Oracle tries to convert both 'New task created: ' and :new.title to a number to add them-- ...


2

You only need to get a list of CU_BILL_ID to search. So remove all other fields from inner query and just select CU_BILL_ID. DELETE FROM [mydatabase].[dbo].[CU_Bill_Log] WHERE [mydatabase].[dbo].[CU_Bill_Log].[CU_BILL_ID] in (SELECT cu_bill_id FROM [mydatabase].[dbo].[CU_Bill_Detail] where Pay_date>13930206) and ...


2

Provide multiple rows in a subquery with a VALUES expression to make it a single UPDATE statement: UPDATE table1 t SET field1 = u.field1 FROM ( VALUES ('abc'::text, 1) -- cast string literal in row 1 to make type unambiguous ,('def', 2) ,('ghi', 3) ) u (field1, filed5) WHERE t.field5 = u.field5; You need to cast to a matching type, ...


2

Triggers are synchronous, and will slow bulk inserts. Service Broker is a good technology for async processing in T-SQL. There is a bit of a learning curve, though, and it is important to follow best practice patterns (e.g. don't "fire and forget"). Make sure you have the unhappy paths covered since processing occurs in the background.


2

No, the target column(s) must be unique, that's the whole idea. However, you can propagate an additional version column from StaticData to TypicalTable: CREATE TABLE StaticData ( id NUMBER, version NUMBER, col1 ... coln, PRIMARY KEY (id,version) ); CREATE TABLE TypicalTable ( StaticDataID NUMBER, version NUMBER, ...


1

In MySQL you can't issue DML statements on a table on which you have defined your trigger. But what you can do is you can use BEFORE trigger to change values that are being inserted or updated. Now assuming that your table's schema looks something like CREATE TABLE location ( id int not null auto_increment primary key, name varchar(128), code ...


1

I think the other answers will give you what you need for the trigger. I dislike triggers. A lot. Not that they don't work, it's that they are often overlooked or dependencies forgotten about. Shorter, they are the devil. Maybe I can convince you to try it a different way. You're already writing PL/SQL, why not just create an API (package)? It's pretty ...


1

If you are updating a column in the same table/row which is getting updated, then you shouldn't use UPDATE statement. Simply, set the column with the new value. :new.update_pwd_date := sysdate; Also, there is no need for pragma autonomous transaction or COMMIT.


1

CREATE TRIGGER sales_earning AFTER INSERT ON sales_transactions FOR EACH ROW UPDATE payouts SET sales_earning = sales_earning + NEW.amount WHERE id = NEW.payout_id ;


1

The function you are after is LENGTH(). Note that is is spelled TH, not HT (which is what you currently have): CREATE TRIGGER 'test' BEFORE INSERT ON 'mytable' FOR EACH ROW SET new.blobsize = LENGTH(new.blobfile);


1

(Considering your Package compiled with no errors) Use- ret_val:= orders_salary_manage2.total_calc(v_old_order); The ret_val must be a NUMBER since the package function total_calc returns a NUMBER. A function MUST always return its outcoume to a variable (like ret_val) depending on the type of the return value the data type of the variable must be ...


1

You're probably looking for something like this DELIMITER $$ CREATE TRIGGER airplane_status_update AFTER INSERT ON servicing FOR EACH ROW BEGIN UPDATE airplane SET status = NEW.status WHERE airplane_id = NEW.airplane_id; END $$ DELIMITER ; You obviously need to tweak an UPDATE statement specifying correct field names since you didn't post DDL for ...



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