Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

You are looking for joined table inheritance. The base class and each subclass each create their own table, each subclass has a foreign key primary key pointing to the base table. SQLAlchemy will automatically handle the joining whether you query the base or sub class. Here is a working example for some products: from decimal import Decimal from ...


3

Your relation is fine. Your issue is, that you set your primary keys yourself (specifically the module_id in your example). The error message clearly tells you what's wrong: There already is a Blindmap with module_id = 1 in your database. Since module_id is your primary key, you can't insert a second one. Instead of trying to set primary and foreign keys ...


2

Your problem is here: $ sudo grep client_encoding /etc/postgresql/9.3/main/postgresql.conf client_encoding = sql_ascii That causes psycopg2 to default to ASCII: >>> import psycopg2 >>> psycopg2.connect('dbname=dev_db user=dev').encoding 'SQLASCII' ... which effectively shuts off psycopg2's ability to handle Unicode. You ...


2

the count() sql aggretate function is pretty simple; it gives you the total number of non-null values in each group. With that in mind, we can adjust your query to give you the proper result. print (Query([ Parent, func.count(Child.id), func.count(case( [((Child.naughty == True), Child.id)], ...


2

If your query is only to get the parents who have > 80 % children naughty, you can on most databases cast the naughty to integer, then take average of it; then having this average greater than 0.8. Thus you get something like from sqlalchemy.sql.expression import cast naughtyp = func.avg(cast(Child.naughty, Integer)) session.query(Parent, ...


2

You get all of the columns from __table__.columns: myTable.__table__.columns or myTable.__table__.c The columns would be in format myTable.col1 (table name is included). If you want just column names, get the .key for each column: [column.key for column in myTable.__table__.columns]


1

If you read the documentation for sqlalchemy.orm.relationship, you can see that you can further limit the relationship by explicitly define the condition using the primaryjoin argument, with an example that perfectly illustrating your required scenario. Adapting that with your requirements, the Product class now follows: class Product(Base): ...


1

Your best bet is probably to create a custom Column type that adapts Enum to translate to and from your own Status class. See here for a full reference. Below is a draft for your core module, the precise code depends a bit on your situation. # core module import sqlalchemy.types as types class DBStatus (types.TypeDecorator): impl = types.Enum # ...


1

SELECT * FROM employer LEFT OUTER JOIN employee ON employee.employer_id = employer.id WHERE employee.id IS NULL; For those not familiar with outer joins (I wasn't before this), this query will return all employer/employee pairs AND returns all employers without employees. These will be paired up with "dummy" employee rows, with all values being ...


1

You can use RelationshipProperty.Comparator.has(): session.query(UserGroup).filter(UserGroup.user == user_x, UserGroup.group.has(Group.grouptype == 'foo')) You may find it more natural to query for Group directly: session.query(Group).filter(Group.users.any(User.id == user_x), Group.grouptype ...


1

I believe your query should be: pwhash = User.query.filter_by(User.username='username').first().password



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible