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Your models definitions are not what you really want. User.classes_id defines exactly one value. Right answer depends of requirements. What type of relationships must be there? Many User to many Classes (M:M)? In this case you would create models like: user_to_classes = Table('user_to_classes', Base.metadata, Column('class_id', Integer, ...


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You probably don't have collation set properly which is responsible for how strings are sorted: The collation feature allows specifying the sort order and character classification behavior of data per-column, or even per-operation. This alleviates the restriction that the LC_COLLATE and LC_CTYPE settings of a database cannot be changed after its ...


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I had the simmilar problem with MySQL sorting. And the solution was: to set DEFAULT CHARACTER SET to schema to 'utf-8' (default was latin-1) and to set DEFAULT COLLATE to schema to 'utf8_unicode_ci'. Another way is to create correct schema in your database.


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start_date, end_date = date(2014, 2, 1), date(2014, 3, 31) q = (db.session.query( db.func.sum(Income.amount).label("total_amount"),) # @note: any of the three below should do the job: .filter(Income.date >= start_date).filter(Income.date <= end_date) # .filter(Income.date.between(start_date, end_date)) # ...


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SQLAlchemy tracks the changes to each attribute. You don't need to (and shouldn't) query the instance again in the event. Additionally, the event is triggered for any instance that has been modified, even if that modification will not change any data. Loop over each column, checking if it has been modified, and store any new values. ...


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After hitting the same issue myself today, this is caused by a hard limit in freetds <= 0.91. It has been patched in the current version on github, but most distributions still have 0.91 or older. tsql is not affected by this limit, as it uses the protocol directly, while most libraries that uses the API has a limit on 20 or 30 bytes for the username and ...


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I'm not using Postgres and I am not able to test it, but it should be possible. According to: http://docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/latest/dialects/postgresql.html Concurrent indexes are allowed in the Postgres dialect from version 0.9.9. However, a migration script like this should work with older versions (direct SQL creation): from alembic import op, context ...


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Try using astext records = db_session.query(Resource).filter( Resources.data["lastname"].astext == "Doe" ).all()


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I found the answer my self. When querying the models, I just need to add the option joinedload('categories') like this : links = Link.query.options(joinedload('categories')).all() for link in links: print link.name for categorie in link.categories print categorie.name Now, only one SQL query is performed.


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Even with SqlAlchemy, you have to think in sets of objects and their values. The query you want involves three different sets: Users, their correct answers and their total answers. Want you want is a query like that (warning, that's just a sample, you could write it much better) select userid, cor_count/ans_count from users inner join (select userid, ...


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Create a column type that does the conversion to and from the database for you. See the documentation about TypeDecorator. from sqlalchemy import String from sqlalchemy.types import TypeDecorator class StringFloat(TypeDecorator): impl = String def process_literal_param(self, value, dialect): return str(float(value)) if value is not None ...


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The way I like to approach this is place all my database code in a lambda or closure, and pass that into a helper function that will handle catching the disconnect exception, and retrying. So with your example: import sqlalchemy as SA def main(): def query(): for name in session.query(Names): print name run_query(query) def ...



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