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Since your custom base model is not a real model, you need to tell SQLAlchemy that it is abstract by setting __abstract__ = True on the class. class MyBase(db.Model): __abstract__ = True Unless you are adding common functionality to this custom base, there's no point in doing this. The empty custom base is basically equivalent to just inheriting from ...


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Flask-SQLAlchemy does nothing to the SQLAlchemy side of things, it is just a wrapper to make it easier to use with Flask along with some convenience features. You can inspect orm objects the same way you normally would. For example, inspecting a model returns its mapper. m = db.inspect(MyModel) # all orm attributes ...


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Bartosz - I am facing a similar problem and came across your question from two years ago. One way to get around this might be to use Postgres json support. What you can do is construct two select queries that convert row output into json, union them together and then decode in python or whatever language you are using. This gets the data in one round trip to ...


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Check the validates decorator of SQLAlchemy: http://docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/rel_1_0/orm/mapped_attributes.html A quick way to add a “validation” routine to an attribute is to use the validates() decorator. An attribute validator can raise an exception, halting the process of mutating the attribute’s value, or can change the given value into ...


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To begin, take a look at Identity vs. Equailty for an explanation on why your None conditions are both returning x IS NULL. The reason why your null() clauses are returning different results is due to how the operators work. As per the documentation, the operators work like the following: In a column context, produces the clause a = b. If the target ...


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So I found a solution myself, not sure if it will work but so far the error seems to be gone. Cheers. followed = db.relationship('User', secondary=followers, foreign_keys=[followers.c.follower_id]) followers = db.relationship('User', secondary=followers, ...


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What you're seeing isn't a transaction, it's a session with no open transaction. Most systems pool connections to save on the cost of setting them up and tearing them down for each and every transaction. Most likely you're seeing a connection that's held in the pool on the SQLAlchemy side, waiting for more work. So long as it's not idle in a transaction ...


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Found a workaround that doesn't used namedtuple, as I don't think that's appropriate for my usecase (ie, I don't think it supports nested dicts/objects without finangling) Found this question, Convert Python dict to object? and decided to adjust my code to use that instead. build = {'x': DB.query(x).filter(x.id == 'query').first()} build = bunchify(build) ...


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You have to try to set not an empty string, but a NULL istead. As it's said in PostgreSql documentation NULL-values are not equals.



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