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5

You are correct that in pandas up to version 0.13.1 postgresql is not supported (but see below for patched postgresql support). In the upcoming release (probably to be released in May), the sql module is refactored to use sqlalchemy, and then you will be able to pass a sqlalchemy engine for a postgresql database (See dev docs: ...


3

You could order by numLogins and take the first result, but that won't work if multiple people have the same number. Instead, find the max number, then find all users with than number. max_logins = db.session.query(db.func.max(User.numLogins)).scalar() users = db.session.query(User).filter(User.numLogins == max_logins).all() You could reduce this to one ...


1

# count the number of friends for each user # friends are users as well, so need alias # construct subquery for use in final query friend = db.aliased(User) sub = db.session.query( User.id, db.func.count(friend.id).label('fc') ).join(friend, User.friends ).group_by(User.id).subquery() # query users, join on subquery to get friend count # order by ...


1

My Flask-Security-Admin-Example project might help. It uses SQLAlchemy ORM in a Python Flask web application that also integrates Flask-Security and Flask-Admin. Also, although it's not a project, the SQLAlchemy ORM tutorial is quite good, and walks you through writing the code you would need in a SQLAlchemy project. Note that both of the above examples ...


1

To supplement @nailxx's answer: Repeating all that boilerplate is tedious if you have many dependent tables. Solution: move it all to a metaclass. class EntityMeta(type(Entity)): def __init__(cls, name, bases, dct): ident = dct.get('_identity',None) if '__abstract__' not in dct: xid = Column(None, ForeignKey(Entity.id), ...


1

Use the hybrid extension: from sqlalchemy.ext.hybrid import hybrid_property class Person(Base): # ... @hybrid_property def name(self): return '{0} {1}'.format(self.first_name, self.last_name) @name.setter def name(self, value): self.first_name, self.last_name = value.split(' ', 1) @name.expression def ...


1

The command db.create_all() will only create models for those classes that you import into the script you use to run that command. For example, lets say that my models.py file has two classes: class User(db.Model): and class Address(db.Model): In the script where I run db.create_all, if my file looks like: from models import User db.create_all() ...


1

What you are doing is not going to work because your query is not evaluated when you call it within render_template. Instead, the sql query string is sent as is to the template. You can use a custom decorator since only want to do this for some views/pages. def get_pending_users(f): @wraps(f) def decorated_function(*args, **kwargs): ...


1

Inspect the instance's mapped class to get a mapping of attribute names to columns. If a column name matches the name you're looking for, get the attribute name from the instance. from sqlalchemy import inspect def getattr_from_column_name(instance, name, default=Ellipsis): for attr, column in inspect(instance.__class__).c.items(): if ...


1

Rather than querying "in" all days of the week use the days as limits. today = date.today() start_of_week = today - timedelta(days=today.weekday()) start_of_following_week = start_of_week + timedelta(days=7) weekly_schedule = WeeklyHour.query.filter( and_( WeeklyHour.start_time >= start_of_week, # On or after Monday ...


1

After lots of research and digging it seems I've found the answer, finally. Since I found many bits and pieces of other people having a hard time solving this and couldn't find a complete and clear answer, I figured I could post it here for future travellers. If you've hit this question, it might be possible that you aren't really looking for a three-way ...


1

if you need a JOIN condition different from what the relationship() defines, then you can't use that relationship to do the join. You have to spell it out explcitly: query(Contact).filter(Contact._id == contact_id) \ .filter(Contact._is_deleted == False) \ .outerjoin(self._contacts_addresses_table) \ .outerjoin(Address, ...


1

assigning session=DBSession would get two different session instances That simply isn't true. session = DBSession is a local variable assignment, and you cannot override local variable assignment in Python (you can override instance member assignment, but that's unrelated). Another thing to note is that scoped_session produces, by default, a ...


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I am not aware of how Storm manages this process, but you can certainly reflect tables in a database with sqlalchemy. For example, below is a basic example using a SQL Server instance that I have access to at the moment. AN ENTIRE DATABASE >>> from sqlalchemy import create_engine, MetaData >>> engine = ...


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Your tables and relationships are setup correctly. Your query needs a change. The reason for an error is the fact that you try to perform a join on the column (Food_Categories.food_categories) instead of a Table (or mapped model object). Technically, you should replace your query with the one below to fix the error: results = ...


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Assuming that t_node is node Table instance, while t_node_node - node_node Table instance, see the statement below. upd = (t_node.update() .values( parent_id = t_node_node.c.parent_id, label = t_node_node.c.label, ) .where(t_node_node.c.child_id == t_node.c.node_id) ) Read more on Inserts, ...



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