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194

Update July 2012 (git 1.7.12+) You now can rebase all commits up to root, and select the second commit Y to be squashed with the first X. git rebase -i --root master pick sha1 X squash sha1Y Y pick sha1 Z git rebase [-i] --root $tip can now be used to rewrite all the history leading to "$tip" down to the root commit. See commit ...


144

Both git merge --squash and git rebase --interactive can produce a "squashed" commit. But they serve different purposes. git merge --squash will produce a squashed commit on the destination branch, without marking any merge relationship. This is useful if you want to throw away the source branch completely, going from (schema taken from SO question): ...


108

In recent versions of git, you can use git rebase --root -i. For each commit except the first, change pick to squash.


84

Squash commits locally with git rebase -i and then force push with git push origin +master.


30

Make sure your working tree is clean, then git reset --soft HEAD~3 git commit -m'new commit message'


30

Merge squash merges a tree (a sequence of commits) into a single commit. That is, it squashes all changes made in n commits into a single commit. Rebasing is re-basing, that is, choosing a new base (parent commit) for a tree. Maybe the mercurial term for this is more clear: they call it transplant because it's just that: picking a new ground (parent commit, ...


30

git merge --no-commit This is just like a normal merge but doesn't create a merge-commit. This commit will be a merge commit: when you look at the history, your commit will appear as a normal merge. git merge --squash This will merge the changes into your working tree without creating a merge commit. When you commit the merged changes, it will look like ...


21

echo "message" | git commit-tree HEAD^{tree} This will create an orphaned commit with the tree of HEAD, and output it's name (SHA-1) on stdout. Then just reset your branch there. git reset SHA-1


20

I've reworked VonC's script to do everything automatically and not ask me for anything. You give it two commit SHA1s and it will squash everything between them into one commit named "squashed history": #!/bin/sh # Go back to the last commit that we want # to form the initial commit (detach HEAD) git checkout $2 # reset the branch pointer to the initial ...


19

Perhaps the easiest way is to just create a new repository with current state of the working copy. If you want to keep all the commit messages you could first do git log > original.log and then edit that for your initial commit message in the new repository: rm -rf .git git init git add . git commit or git log > original.log # edit original.log as ...


18

The easiest way is to use the 'plumbing' command update-ref to delete the current branch. You can't use git branch -D as it has a safety valve to stop you deleting the current branch. This puts you back into the 'initial commit' state where you can start with a fresh initial commit. git update-ref -d refs/heads/master git commit -m "New initial commit"


15

For what it's worth, I avoid this problem by always creating a "no-op" first commit, in which the only thing in the repository is an empty .gitignore: https://github.com/DarwinAwardWinner/git-custom-commands/blob/master/bin/git-myinit That way, there's never any reason to mess with the first commit.


13

First, squash all your commits into a single commit using git rebase --interactive. Now you're left with two commits to squash. To do so, read any of How do I combine the first two commits of a Git repository? git: how to squash the first two commits?


13

The differences These options exists for separate purposes. Your repository ends up differently. Let's suppose that your repository is like this after you are done developing on the topic branch: --squash If you checkout master and then git merge --squash topic; git commit -m topic, you get this: --no-ff --no-commit Instead, if you do git merge ...


11

I do not know what Git Extensions does with it specifically, but git rebase has an option to automatically squash or fixup commits with squash! or fixup! prefixes, respectively: --autosquash, --no-autosquash When the commit log message begins with "squash! ..." (or "fixup! ..."), and there is a commit whose title begins with the same ..., ...


10

This is an old topic, but I just ran across it while looking for similar information. A trick similar to the one described in Subtree octopus merge is a really good solution to this type of problem: git checkout my-feature git reset --soft Y git rev-parse f > .git/MERGE_HEAD git commit That will take the index as it exists at the tip of my-feature, ...


10

Lets go though the steps. 1 - We create a new feature branch git checkout -b new-feature 2 - Now you can add/remove and update whatever you want on your new branch git add <new-file> git commit -am "Added new file" git rm <file-name> git commit -am "Removed a file" cat "add more stuff to file" >> <new-file> git commit -am ...


8

It depends on your OS (git Tower, on MacOs only for instance, is a particular fine GUI but doesn't offer any particular feature for an interactive rebase). On Windows, there doesn't seem to be any GUI for that feature. The easiest way remains one involving no interface, where you can run a git rebase --interactive --autosquash because you committed ...


8

"Squashing" and "preserving history" are approximately direct opposites in terminology. If you mean that you want to make a single commit that includes only your changes and not the ones from upstream master, you would probably want to rebase onto origin/master and then squash from there. You could do all of this from a single invocation of interactive ...


6

It probably doesn't let you because such a command wouldn't make sense. The documentation for --squash says (emphasis mine): --squash Produce the working tree and index state as if a real merge happened (except for the merge information), but do not actually make a commit or move the HEAD, nor record GIT_DIR/MERGE_HEAD to cause the next git commit ...


6

Just a simple addition to help someone else looking for this solution. You can pass in the number of previous commits you would like to squash. for example, git rebase -i HEAD~3 This will bring up the last 3 commits in the editor.


5

If you just want to keep your five commits for reference, maybe you should work in a branch with them. git branch new-branch master Do your commits. Since you have done this, just reset head of master: git reset --hard HEAD~5 git merge --squash master new-branch git push You will end up with squashed commit on master and origin/master and 5 commits on ...


5

It is possible that this is an error in the documentation of the subtree command. The manual in git states: options for 'add', 'merge', 'pull' and 'push' --squash merge subtree changes as a single commit If you check the more extended documentation in the original subtree project you will notice that the --squash option is only explained ...


5

git reset $(git commit-tree HEAD^{tree} -m "commit message") Here "commit message" is just an example, feel free to use your own language. As suggested, making it an answer from my previous comment Explain: What git commit-tree HEAD^{tree} -m "commit message" does is: Creates a new commit object based on the provided tree object and emits the new ...


5

Short answer - no, you can't even change the message of a commit without changing its hash, much less adding a file. Generally, if you have pushed a change to a remote (that others depend on) you don't change the history by doing things like amending and squashing commits. The ideal approach might be for you to add the file in a separate commit and have ...


4

I read something about using grafts but never investigated it much. Anyway, you can squash those last 2 commits manually with something like this: git reset HEAD~1 git add -A git commit --amend


4

Try git rebase -i, and use 'squash' for all the commits you want to squash. Edit: git rebase -i will show you an interactive editor with the list of commits you are rebasing. The default command before each commit is "pick", so you just need to s/pick/squash/ for all the commits you want to squash, and then all of them will be squash into their last ...


4

ok I figured it out ... First I had to write git rebase -i xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx where xxxxxxxxxx is the SHA of the commit upto which I've to squash. Then in Notepad I edited the first as pick and rest of all as squash. Then a new notepad window will come and there in the first line I typed the name of my new commit. And then I forcely pushed this commit : git ...


4

Reasons for squashing commits: A cleaner, simpler history. A smaller history. Less baggage when cloning repos. Removes "junk" commits, such as typo fixes. Gives the opportunity to improve commit messages. Reasons against squashing commits: We can no longer follow the history of that feature/bugfix in order to learn how it was developed or see ...


4

When rebasing, Git will not move commits to another branch. It will move the branch including all its commits. If you want to get the commits into master after rebasing on top of it, use git merge <branch tip or commit of branch> to fast-forward the master branch to that commit.



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