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54

@Bill Karwin Thanks for your elaboration. In a way, the problem is not the compile time itself, it is the fact that a long compile time leads to distraction which breaks your "flow." If a compile takes longer than a minute, then you start to read your e-mail, browser Reddit, read Slashdot, write another paragraph in the specification you need to finish for ...


30

How much time does it take right now? Buy one to see how you'd gain by this, check the time against the price of all these still-very-expensive per GB SSDs and see whether it is worth it or not. The main business case for SSD is generally that they have no moving parts and are exactly what you need for a laptop... You can have a better bandwidth by having ...


27

When people talk about sequential vs random writes to a file, they're generally drawing a distinction between writing without intermediate seeks ("sequential"), vs. a pattern of seek-write-seek-write-seek-write, etc. ("random"). The distinction is very important in traditional disk-based systems, where each disk seek will take around 10ms. Sequentially ...


17

Finally a reliable solution! Two of them, actually! Check /sys/block/sdX/queue/rotational, where sdX is the drive name. If it's 0, you're dealing with an SSD, and 1 means plain old HDD. I can't put my finger on the Linux version where it was introduced, but it's present in Ubuntu's Linux 3.2 and in vanilla Linux 3.6 and not present in vanilla 2.6.38. ...


16

Joel Spolsky says it's "totally worth it" - http://www.joelonsoftware.com/items/2009/03/27.html Joel didn't have much luck with compile times, but if you know (by evidence) that disk i/o is the bottle neck in your compile times, then a SSD should help. Most engineers underestimate the cost of human (programmer) context-switching. Compile times under a ...


15

If you get 40 second builds from a RAM-disk (compared to 2-3 minutes on a HDD), then why don't you simply give all the developers an additional 2 Gigs of RAM and change your build (or even development) system to use a RAM-disk? It's tons cheaper (at the moment) and RAM can be used for a lot of other tasks as well.


12

Your example of hashtables is indeed the key database structure that will benefit. Instead of having to load a whole 4GB or more file into memory to probe for values, the SSD can be probed directly. The SSD is still slower than RAM, by orders of magnitude, but it's quite reasonable to have a 50GB hash table on disk, but not in RAM unless you pay big money ...


12

SSD are supposed to identify themselves as non-rotative. For linux, as example, you can get the info via sysfs: cat /sys/block/sda/queue/rotational If it returns 0, you have SSD...


12

My 2 cents: SSD only pays off if your applications are stored on it, not your data. And even then only if a lot of access to disk is necessary, like for an OS. People are right to point you to profiling. I can tell you without doing it that almost all of the reading time goes to processing, not to reading on the disk. It pays off far more to think about ...


12

This all greatly depends on your build environment and other setup. E.g. on my main compile server, I have 96GiB of RAM and 16 cores. The hdd is rather slow, but that doesn't really matter as about everything is cached in RAM. On my desktop (where I also compile sometimes) I only have 8Gib of ram, and 6 cores. Doing the same parallel build there could be ...


11

If your development bottleneck is that of I/O seek time during compiles, you're definitely doing software engineering wrong. To elaborate: Most programming involves a lot of work other than actual compiles: Requirements analysis Designing the solution Coordinating with other team members to understand the interfaces of their components Typing in the ...


11

Two points: I see nothing surprising about your 15k drives writing faster than the SSD. Flash memory is slow writing. Internally, NAND flash memory it is page oriented (pages>sectors). So to write a sector the SSD reads the page, replaces 512 bytes, erases the page, and finally writes the page. Your tests are totally sequential. Your write test is a ...


10

I'd start by figuring out why the tests failed, and that might give you some clues as to how they might have passed before. Sometimes it's a timing issue, intermittent failure, something external to the test harness, data changing, a change of date or time, all sorts of stuff.


9

I see Mike found your problem (ticky the little answer box please). Yes, it is possible for code to change without Git knowing about it. The file which caused the failure, perhaps a temporary testing file or fixture, could be ignored either in .gitignore or .git/info/exclude. Doing a git clean -dxf will wipe the checkout clean of anything not known to ...


8

I believe you are using the wrong tool. Instead of making assumptions based on a drive being an SSD you should make your code work well with slow and fast drives, for example by loading the essential objects first and the rest later. In three years the invention of [...] may make regular hard drives faster than SSDs which would break your code. Going purely ...


7

You can actually fairly easily determine the rotational latency -- I did this once as part of a university project. It is described in this report. You'll want to skip to page 7 where you see some nice graphs of the latency. It goes from about 9.3 ms to 1.1 ms -- a drop of 8.2 ms. That corresponds directly to 60 s / 8.2 ms = 7317 RPM. It was done with ...


7

I've had problems with this before, but this is not specific to SSD drives. You would be far better off doing a move then delete: if(Directory.Exists(dirpath)) { string temppath = dirpath + ".deleted"; Directory.Move(dirpath, temppath); Directory.Delete(temppath, true); } Directory.Create(dirpath); The other way to deal with it is to loop ...


6

http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2010/09/revisiting-solid-state-hard-drives.html has a good article on SSDs, comments offer alot of insights. Depends on the type of analysis you're doing, whether it's CPU bound or IO bound. Personal experience dealing with regression modelling tells me former is more often the case, SSDs wouldn't be of much use then. In ...


6

Number of tracks per cylinders (aka. heads) and sectors per track is just a way of measurement on modern disks. If you give other values for these, all you do is change the way fdisk looks at the disk, but the content is the same. However, as you point out, you want fdisk to look at the disk in a certain way so that it creates partitions that align with the ...


6

Yes, when you accept the defaults and let the TFS configuration wizard install SQL Express for you, it will place the data files in C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server. To move the data files to another location, you need to stop TFS, detach the database files, move them to a new location and then reattach them and start TFS. To stop TFS, follow these ...


5

A couple of people have called out the write limitations on flash. This isn't much of an issue for the better SSDs---especially for the high-end ones that folks like EMC are using. Take a look, for example, at Intel's X25-E. It uses single-layer cell (SLC) flash, which can handle more writes than the cheaper, denser multi-layer cell (MLC) flash that is ...


5

I've got a new answer/reason to bring to the table, I know this is an old question... Do it for your office safety! SSDs reduce the amount of office sword fights, by reducing the time spent compiling. That alone might not be a compelling business case, though. In seriousness, as others have already stated: buy one and find out the numbers for your ...


5

Actually, I think you should go the benchmarking route, because it more accurately answers your question - you don't really care that the disk happens to be an SSD, you just care that the disk is really fast. What if the user is using a fast RAID setup, or a Fiber Channel array, or is using iSCSI? Just read a bunch of random sectors from the underlying ...


5

I think you need more 's'-es in this? $stmt->bind_param("ss", $mtcn, $amount, $currency, $sender_name, $sender_country, $receiver_name, $comment, $support, $email); try this (asuming they're all strings) $stmt->bind_param("sssssssss", $mtcn, $amount, $currency, $sender_name, $sender_country, $receiver_name, $comment, $support, $email);


5

After exploring System.IO.Directory with reflector, it looks like .Delete is just a wrapper around the FindFirstFile, FindNextFile, and RemoveDirectory Win API calls. There's nothing threaded or asynchronous about the .Net runtime's invokation of those API calls, or the API implementation themselves. Now, supposing its somehow a TRIM issue, you can disable ...


5

It is true that SSDs eliminate the seek time issue for reading, but writing efficiently on them is quite tricky. We have been doing some research into these issues while looking for the best way to use SSDs for the Acunu storage core. You might find these interesting: Log file systems and SSDs – made for each other? Why theory fails for SSDs


4

Detecting SSDs is not as impossible as dseifert makes out. There is already some progress in linux's libata (http://linux.derkeiler.com/Mailing-Lists/Kernel/2009-04/msg03625.html), though it doesn't seem user-ready yet. And I definitely understand why this needs to be done. It's basically the difference between a linked list and an array. Defragmentation ...


4

I've been testing and using them for a while and whilst I have my own opinions (which are very positive) I think that Anandtech.com's testing document is far better than anything I could have written, see what you think; http://www.anandtech.com/show/2739 Regards, Phil.


4

If you think Air Jordans can help you dunk, you have been listening to too much marketing. Likewise an SSD isn't going to help your productivity if you blow the savings on stack overflow (or slashdot or gizmodo etc etc). Get the fastest thing you can afford and get back to work! ;)


4

I found the answer by doing some good old testing and trying out. It seems that sqlite will freeze on SSDs with TRIM when doing a lot of single UPDATE statements after each other in a transaction. I've changed the code now: a) prepare a command and reuse that command for all the to-be updated records. b) COMMIT and BEGIN a new transaction every 1500 ...



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