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5

In general, these have been additive but keep in mind that there are differences between Intel and AMD support for these over the years. If you have AVX, then you can assume SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4.1, and SSE 4.2 as well. Remember that to use AVX you also need to validate the OSXSAVE CPUID bit is set to ensure the OS you are using actually supports ...


4

There is no direct conversion from float to byte, _mm_cvtps_pi8 is a composite. _mm_cvtps_pi16 is also a composite, and in this case it's just doing some pointless stuff that you undo with the shuffle. They also return annoying __m64's. Anyway, we can convert to dwords (signed, but that doesn't matter), and then pack (unsigned) or shuffle them into bytes. ...


3

As a general rule - don't mix different generations of SSE / AVX unless you have to. If you do, make sure you use vzeroupper or similar state clearing instructions, otherwise you may drag partial values and unknowingly create false dependencies, since most of the registers are shared between the modes Even when clearing, switching between modes may cause ...


2

In your code very basic floating point maths is involved. And I bet if you turn optimizations on (even -O1) it gets optimized out because those values are constant expressions and so calculable at compile-time. SSE is used (movss, mulss) because it's the threshold of floating point calculus, if we want. SSE2 has no scope here. In order to find room for ...


2

The first thing you need to know is that SSE2 and SSE are enabled and used by default for 64-bit code. For 32-bit code the default was x87 instructions. The second thing you need to know is that double floating requires SSE2 so if you want to see a difference between SSE and SSE2 in your example you should compare double with float. The third thing you ...


2

MOVSS moves single precision floats (32-bit). I assume that n is an integer so you can't load it into a XMM register with MOVSS. Use CVTSI2SS instead. printf cannot process single precision floats, which would converted to doubles by the compiler. It's convenient to use CVTSS2SI at this point. So the code should look like: ... ; ; pow is computed by ...


2

To my understanding, packed means that conceptually more than one value is transferred or used as an operand, whereas non-packed means that only one value is is processed; non-packed means that no parallel processing takes place.


2

For the second load you need to use _mm_loadu_si128 because the source data is misaligned. Explanation: an offset of +5 ints from a base address which is 16 byte aligned will no longer be 16 byte aligned.


1

If you just want a horizontal add, i.e. sum all the 4 32 bit int elements in the result vector, then you can just shift and add twice, then extract one element, e.g.: __m128i vsum = _mm_add_epi32(v, _mm_srli_si128(v, 8)); vsum = _mm_add_epi32(vsum, _mm_srli_si128(vsum, 4)); int32_t sum = _mm_cvtsi128_si32(vsum);


1

In threshold, short int i, N=16; should be: short int i, N=8; This is because there are 8 x short int elements per vector, and pointer arithmetic takes the size of the elements into account (my guess is that you were assuming you needed to work with 16 bytes as the size of a vector ?).


1

Before a comment on alignment, please take into account houssam's comment and Paul's answer, corruption comes from here for sure. Now, src may be not 16-byte aligned. Refering to this post about alignment on static arrays, src is aligned on 2-byte words at least, but maybe not on 16-byte addresses. So, even if line1 is declared as an aligned pointer, the ...


1

For _mm_shuffle_epi8 there is VTBL. For _mm_unpackXX_YYY the closest is probably VMOVL but you will probably need to do a little extra work to get the equivalent functionality, e.g. int32x4_t v = vld1q_s32(p); // load vector from p int64x2_t vl = vmovl_s32(vget_low_s32(v)); // unpack v into 2 vectors int64x2_t vh = ...


1

Debugger, in this example, interprets the __m128i value as two 64-bit integers, as opposed to four 32-bit ones expected by you. The actual conversion is correct. In your code you need to explicitly specify how to interpret the SIMD value, for example: test_i.m128i_i32[0]



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