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This line is a problem: ADD ../../home/ubuntu/.ssh/id_rsa /root/.ssh/id_rsa When specifying the files you want to copy into the image you can only use relative paths - relative to the directory where your Dockerfile is. So you should instead use: ADD id_rsa /root/.ssh/id_rsa And put the id_rsa file into the same directory where your Dockerfile is. ...


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Here is a snippet, just replace the parts from the example here. SshClient ssh = new SshClient(); ssh.setSocketTimeout(30000); SshConnectionProperties props = new SshConnectionProperties(); props.setHost(hostname); props.setPort(port); ssh.connect(props , new IgnoreHostKeyVerification()); // ignore unknown host warning // Create a password ...


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Thank you to Garreth for pointing me in the right direction. Unfortunately, this problem doesn't have a happy ending. I checked out the private key file and noticed that it began with these two lines: Proc-Type: 4,ENCRYPTED DEK-Info: DES-EDE3-CBC,BCC23A5E16582F3D Evidently this means that the key has been encrypted, and encrypted keys need a password ...


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The key has become corrupted in some way. Check it to make sure that no extra characters or lines got added to it (eg via been pasted in an email that wasn't plain text). Check each individual line of the key in a plain text editor. There should be no blank characters at the end of any line, and no new lines beyond the key demarcation line.


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I'm able to fix this by creating an authorized_keys file under the xxxx user home directory(/home/xxxx/.ssh/authorized_keys) instead of /root/.ssh/authorized_keys


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Modify the permissions so that: The key file doesn't inherit from the container You (the owner) have full access Remove permission entries for any other users (e.g., SYSTEM, Administrator) Add an Entry for special user Everyone and edit the permissions for that user to Deny for all permissions: Right click on the file in Windows Explorer and choose ...


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Thats pretty much a big subject and what might be secure for me might not be for you. But generally its okay but I would keep the following points. Use that deploys should have limited access on what he can do (if possible) You can use the authorized_keys to limit the source of key if it was compromised http://man.he.net/man5/authorized_keys As said by ...


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This question is very broad, but I'd say using Ansible Vault is the right approach. You are checking in your ssh keys in a git repository but they are encrypted and you can only decrypt them with your password. If you want to improve even more security you can try creating 4096 or 8192 ssh keys like I do. In general ssh key authentication is pretty secure ...


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You can copy your older ssh keys to the new machine. Basically, copy your ~/.ssh/id_rsa and ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub files to this new machine at same location, and you should be able to ssh in all right. You might need to explicitly specify the user account you want to ssh into like ssh user@server. Also, you might want to go through more answers on reusing ssh ...


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Well, Well Ansible is simple if you take ansible out of the equation. And think ssh 1- You can create an account for each person and they can deploy their private key and ansible will use that. 2- I read somewhere that ansible will be able to use forward agent at somepoint mabye it all ready in 1.6 3- you can wrap ansible with a shell script that will ...


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Looks like you're using keyfile authentication, so you'll get this error from Jenkins if you haven't set the permissions correctly on your ~/.ssh/authorized_keys file. The .ssh folder should have drwx------ permissions (read/write/execute owner only), and the authorized_keys file should have drw------- permissions (read/write owner only). To fix it: chmod ...


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Go to the Google Developers Console (https://console.developers.google.com). Click on your project. Click on Compute Engine on the left menu. Click on Metadata, which is the 6th item down on the expanded menu beneath where you clicked on Compute Engine.


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You have to specify your key with -i option in your 3rd step too. ssh -i testing_rsa user@remoteserver Also you can specify multiple keys with multiple -i options.


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You need to use the -i flag: ssh-copy-id -i my.key.pub 10.10.1.1 From the man page: If the -i option is given then the identity file (defaults to ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub) is used, regardless of whether there are any keys in your ssh-agent. Otherwise, if this: ssh-add -L provides any output, it uses that in preference to the identity file



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