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53

While not recommended, you can also disable SSL cert validation alltogether: import javax.net.ssl.*; import java.security.SecureRandom; import java.security.cert.X509Certificate; public class SSLTool { public static void disableCertificateValidation() { // Create a trust manager that does not validate certificate chains TrustManager[] ...


47

The handshake failure could have occurred due to various reasons: Incompatible cipher suites in use by the client and the server. This would require the client to use (or enable) a cipher suite that is supported by the server. Incompatible versions of SSL in use (the server might accept only TLS v1, while the client is capable of only using SSL v3). Again, ...


42

First you need to obtain the public certificate from the server you're trying to connect to. That can be done in a variety of ways, such as contacting the server admin and asking for it, using openssl to download it, or, since this appears to be an HTTP server, connecting to it with any browser, viewing the page's security info, and saving a copy of the ...


42

Finally solved it ;). Got a strong hint here (Gandalfs answer touched a bit on it as well). The missing links was (mostly) the first of the parameters below, and to some extent that I overlooked the difference between keystores and truststores. The self-signed server certificate must be imported into a truststore: keytool -import -alias gridserver -file ...


15

HTTPS proxy doesn't make sense because you can't terminate your HTTP connection at the proxy for security reasons. With your trust policy, it might work if the proxy server has a HTTPS port. Your error is caused by connecting to HTTP proxy port with HTTPS. You can connect through a proxy using SSL tunneling (many people call that proxy) using proxy CONNECT ...


12

Have you set the KeyStore and/or TrustStore System properties? java -Djavax.net.ssl.keyStore=pathToKeystore -Djavax.net.ssl.keyStorePassword=123456 or from with the code System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStore", pathToKeyStore); Same with javax.net.ssl.trustStore


9

If you are dealing with a web service call using the Axis framework, there is a much simpler answer. If all want is for your client to be able to call the SSL web service and ignore SSL certificate errors, just put this statement before you invoke any web services: System.setProperty("axis.socketSecureFactory", ...


9

Bruno's answer was the correct one in the end. This is most easily controlled by the https.protocols system property. This is how you are able to control what the factory method returns. Set to "TLSv1" for example.


7

Depending on the type of CXF client you have to options. If you have Spring-based client configuration you have to add attribute to your http:conduit configuration: <http:conduit name="{http://apache.org/hello_world_soap_http}SoapPort.http-conduit"> <http:tlsClientParameters disableCNCheck="true"> <!-- other tls configuration ...


6

I have seen issues like this with TLS/SSLv3 negotiation. http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/documentation/tlsreadme2-176330.html In SSL/TLS, renegotiations can be initiated by either side. Like the Phase 1 fix, applications communicating with an un-upgraded peer in Interoperable mode and that attempt to initiate renegotiation (via ...


5

It looks like you're using Apache HttpClient 3. If this is indeed version 3, you need to build your own SecureProtocolSocketFactory as explained in the Apache HttpClient 3 SSL guide. There is an example here. For Apache HttpClient 4, you should be able to pass an SSLContext to the constructor to the (HttpClient) SSLSocketFactory, as described in the answers ...


5

I think that the real problem is that Weblogic is not using standard Sun HTTPS implementation provided by JDK, but rather uses its own, as apparent on this line: at weblogic.net.http.SOAPHttpsURLConnection.getInputStream(SOAPHttpsURLConnection.java:37) The standard Sun implementation class is called javax.net.ssl.HttpsURLConnection. As a result, the ...


5

It seems that in the debug log for Java 6 the request is send in SSLv2 format. main, WRITE: SSLv2 client hello message, length = 110 This is not mentioned as enabled by default in Java 7. Change the client to use SSLv3 and above to avoid such interoperability issues. Look for differences in JSSE providers in Java 7 and Java 6


5

This can also happend when the client needs to present a certificate. After the server lists the certificate chain, the following can happen: 3. Certificate Request The server will issue a certificate request from the client. The request will list all of the certificates the server accepts. *** CertificateRequest Cert Types: RSA Cert Authorities: ...


4

Well, I got this issue solved. It appears that by creating a self-signed certificate, using keytool, without providing -keyalg parameter makes the key-pair algorithm default to DSA. None of my ciphers suite included DSA algorithm. In that case, although the client and the server had intersection between their cipher-suites, neither was suitable for the key ...


4

SSL socket connections are well supported in Java and are likely a good choice for you. The one thing to understand in advance is that SSL provides both encryption and server authentication; you can't easily get just the encryption. For reference, the encryption protects against network eavesdropping, while the server authentication protects against "man ...


4

'Connection timeout' has nothing to do with the handshake, or even SSL. It doesn't happen when you call startHandshake(): it happens when you create the socket. Your stack trace would have told you that. To reduce it, create a Socket() using the default constructor; call connect(SocketAddress address, long timeout); then if that succeeds call ...


4

You can import the root certificate of StartCom yia the tool keytool (from JDK) into a Java Key Store (JKS) and then set the key store as "trusted store". See section "Exporting and Importing Certificates" on: http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/Security/secureinternet2/ Commands mentioned in that article: Import certifificate to ...


3

Make sure you haven't enabled starttls in your properties (mail.smtp.starttls.enable=true)


3

I use the Apache commons HTTP Client package to do this in my current project and it works fine with SSL and a self-signed cert (after installing it into cacerts like you mentioned). Please take a look at it here: http://hc.apache.org/httpclient-3.x/tutorial.html http://hc.apache.org/httpclient-3.x/sslguide.html


3

You're connecting to port 25 and using SSL. Port 25 is the non-SSL (plain text) port. Assuming your server is set up for SSL, use the connect method that doesn't require you to specify a port number and let JavaMail use the default port.


3

It seems you are trying to generate Java classes using a WSDL from an HTTPS URL. It fails when it is trying to validate the certificate. Try to access the WSDL from your browser and it should give you a warning. You can save the WSDL to your local directory and try to run WSDL2Java for that file. However you might get similar errors when you access the ...


2

I would test without using your code for starters. For example, try to test an SSL operation of some kind using one of the LDAP Utils binaries (e.g: ldapsearch, ldapwhoami, etc). Make sure SSL/TLS works that way. If it doesn't work, check your local system LDAP settings, and ALSO verify the certificate being used by the server is not expired and not ...


2

You have setup your server wrong. You also need to upload intermediate CA to your server. There has to be 2 certificates in your server. When you execute the below line in you command line interface, you should see 2 certificates in "Certificate Chain" section. openssl s_client -debug -connect api.metrekare.com:443


2

[...] 79 more Caused by: javax.net.ssl.SSLHandshakeException: sun.security.validator.ValidatorException: PKIX path building failed: sun.security.provider.certpath.SunCertPathBuilderException: unable to find valid certification path to requested target at com.sun.net.ssl.internal.ssl.Alerts.getSSLException(Unknown Source) at [...] That is the important ...


2

Whenever we are trying to connect to URL , If server at the other site is running on https protocol and is mandating that we should communicate via information provided in certificate then we have following option 1) ask for the certificate(download the certificate) ,import this certificate in trustore. Default trustore java uses can be found in ...


2

Might be you are missing intermediate CA certificate at your server end. Try reading this Most public CAs don't sign server certificates directly. Instead, they use their main CA certificate, referred to as the root CA, to sign intermediate CAs. They do this so the root CA can be stored offline to reduce risk of compromise. However, operating systems like ...


2

I got this when I accidentally put the non-ssl port in the URL but started the URL with https. Doh. Sometimes the simplest solutions are the ones that we forget!


2

I resolve that problem as follows: Go with Chrome (or other browser that allows to save the certificate) to svn address Save the certificate file Install it into Trusted Root Center of Certificates (that could be named with other words, I dont know how exactly that named in english) Also, changing svn client (from svn tortoise) to another solves problem ...


2

After getting in touch with a few RIM personal about this particular issue we found out that the TLS/SSL server is intolerant of certain extensions, so with the following Qt code to disable transmission of extensions the connection was succesfully made through https: QSslConfiguration cfg(request.sslConfiguration()); ...



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