Hot answers tagged

361

There are a couple of possibilities. One is like to use a stringstream as a go-between: std::ifstream t("file.txt"); std::stringstream buffer; buffer << t.rdbuf(); Now the contents of "file.txt" is available in a string as buffer.str(). Another possibility (though I certainly don't like it as well) is much more like your original: std::ifstream ...


288

Update: Turns out that this method, while following STL idioms well, is actually surprisingly inefficient! Don't do this with large files. (See: http://insanecoding.blogspot.com/2011/11/how-to-read-in-file-in-c.html) You can make a streambuf iterator out of the file and initialize the string with it: #include <string> #include <fstream> ...


276

I understand the situation a bit better now (in no small amount due to the answers here!), so I thought I add a little write-up of my own. There are two distinct, though related, concepts in C++11: Asynchronous computation (a function that is called somewhere else), and concurrent execution (a thread, something that does work concurrently). The two are ...


168

There isn't one, though there is no need to write a wrapper function, because you can directly use os.Stat and os.IsNotExist in a single line. To check if a file doesn't exist, equivalent to Python's if not os.path.exists(filename): if _, err := os.Stat("/path/to/whatever"); os.IsNotExist(err) { // path/to/whatever does not exist } In the above ...


146

Your code, as written, works. You’re probably trying to achieve something unrelated, but similar: std::string c = "hello" + "world"; This doesn’t work because for C++ this seems like you’re trying to add two char pointers. Instead, you need to convert at least one of the char* literals to a std::string. Either you can do what you’ve already posted in the ...


98

In the words of [futures.state] a std::future is an asynchronous return object ("an object that reads results from a shared state") and a std::promise is an asynchronous provider ("an object that provides a result to a shared state") i.e. a promise is the thing that you set a result on, so that you can get it from the associated future. The asynchronous ...


73

So, why don't I implement a less general, but easier to use version? Because you can't. Because whatever else you might say about C++, it is not a simple language, and if you're not already very good at it, your linked list implementation will be buggy. Honestly, your choice is simple: Learn C++, or don't use it. Yes, C++ is commonly used for ...


73

You can convert to a set and back to an array again quite easily: let unique = Array(Set(originals)) This is not guaranteed to maintain the original order of the array.


63

<joke>It's obviously used to decay radioactive std::atomic types into non-radioactive ones.</joke> N2609 is the paper that proposed std::decay. The motivating example is C++03 std::make_pair: template <class T1, class T2> inline pair<T1,T2> make_pair(T1 x, T2 y) { return pair<T1,T2>(x, y); } which accepted its ...


55

There are a number of reasons why this a bad idea. First, this is a bad idea because the standard containers do not have virtual destructors. You should never use something polymorphically that does not have virtual destructors, because you cannot guarantee cleanup in your derived class. Basic rules for virtual dtors Second, it is really bad design. ...


51

The "c" stands for "character" because iostreams map values to and from byte (char) representations. [Bjarne Stroustrup's C++ Style and Technique FAQ]


51

Deprecated Functions Insecure A perfect example of such a function is gets(), because there is no way to tell it how big the destination buffer is. Consequently, any program that reads input using gets() has a buffer overflow vulnerability. For similar reasons, one should use strncpy() in place of strcpy() and strncat() in place of strcat(). Yet some more ...


46

C and C++ libraries are almost universally written in C and C++, as are C and C++ compilers. In fact, many compilers are even used to compile themselves! How is this possible? Well, obviously the first C compiler couldn't have been initially developed in C. However, once a C compiler exists, then it can be used to compile another compiler. And as a compiler ...


44

The corelist command from the Module::CoreList module will determine if a module is Core or not. > corelist Carp Carp was first release with perl 5 > corelist XML::Twig XML::Twig was not in CORE (or so I think) Here is one way to use it in a script. The Module::CoreList POD is too terse -- you have to go hunting through the source code to find ...


43

Basically your question boils down to “is it reasonable to have [free library xyz] as a dependency for a C++ open source project.” Now consider the following quote from Stroustrup and the answer is really a no-brainer: Without a good library, most interesting tasks are hard to do in C++; but given a good library, almost any task can be made easy ...


42

std::string a = "Hello "; a += "World";


41

Mersenne Twister is a shift-register based pRNG and is therefore subject to bad seeds with long runs of 0s or 1s that lead to relatively predictable results until the internal state is mixed up enough. However the constructor which takes a single value uses a complicated function on that seed value which is designed to minimize the likelihood of producing ...


36

Short story: overload when you can, specialise when you need to. Long story: C++ treats specialisation and overloads very differently. This is best explained with an example. template <typename T> void foo(T); template <typename T> void foo(T*); // overload of foo(T) template <> void foo<int>(int*); // specialisation of ...


36

'Old' C++: The function will not return the local variable but rather a copy of it. Your compiler might however perform an optimization where no actual copy action is made. See this question & answer for further details C++11: The function will move the value, see this answer for further details


35

For any fixed-width integral type, nearly all of the possible input pairs overflow the type, anyway. What's the use of standardizing a function that doesn't give a useful result for vast majority of its possible inputs? You pretty much need to have an big integer type in order to make the function useful, and most big integer libraries provide the ...


34

Since I was neither closely associated with the creators of C nor C++ in the days of their creation (though I am rather old), nor part of the ANSI/ISO committees that created the standards, this is necessarily opinion on my part. I'd like to think it's informed opinion but, as my wife will tell you (frequently and without much encouragement needed), I've ...


34

The compiler Eclipse is using is able to resolve the symbols just fine, so the code will compile fine. But the code-completion/preprocessor Eclipse is using doesn't know where stdio.h exists. You need to specify the filesystem path where stdio.h is located. See: ...


33

Modules to cover in a 1-2 hour slot entirely depend on your audience's interest or focus. What other classes are they taking? What are they prepared to make use of immediately? Be sure to mention math, decimal and datetime and time and re. For IT-types who will be doing file-oriented work: glob, fnmatch, os, os.path, tempfile, and shutil. Database folks ...


33

I read the minutes of the Bristol meeting, but they don't even reference the original proposal. The minutes are accurate. N3588 (original recipe, without Standardese) was not discussed in the full committee, only N3656 (extra crispy, with Standardese) was discussed there. If you haven't been to a meeting, this might seem strange, but what happens is ...


32

What C standard library functions are used inappropriately/in ways that may cause/lead to security problems/code defects/inefficiencies ? I'm gonna go with the obvious : char *gets(char *s); With its remarkable particularity that it's simply impossible to use it appropriately.


32

Answer by Caleb Spare posted in gonuts mailing list. " [...] It's not actually needed very often and [...] using os.Stat is easy enough for the cases where it is required. [...] For instance: if you are going to open the file, there's no reason to check whether it exists first. The file could disappear in between checking and opening, and anyway you'll ...


30

I found these answers (including the accepted one) somewhat cryptic. For me, I had to add the path where stdio.h is located (as @ardnew said). In Eclipse, you open the Properties of your project, expand "C/C++ General" and select "Paths and Symbols". Make sure you have added the include dir for each language you are using. (In my case, I needed to just add ...


30

The reason is that just writing !pred(*first) could result in a call to an overloaded operator! rather than the call to explicit operator bool. It's interesting that this measure was taken for pred, but an overloaded operator&& can still be selected in the implementation provided. first != last would need to be changed to bool(first != last) to also ...


30

The lens package provides some of this. Testing for emptiness, creating empty containers These are both provided by the AsEmpty typeclass from Control.Lens.Empty. Accessing elements by key/index. The At and Ixed typeclasses from Control.Lens.At. Checking for membership in set-like containers. The Contains typeclass from Control.Lens.At. Appending and ...



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