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68

Using star schemas for a data warehouse system gets you several benefits and in most cases it is appropriate to use them for the top layer. You may also have an operational data store (ODS) - a normalised structure that holds 'current state' and facilitates operations such as data conformation. However there are reasonable situations where this is not ...


14

Temporary tables are most useful for a complex batch process like a report or ETL job. Generally you would expect to use them fairly rarely in a transactional application. If you're doing complex query with a join involving multiple large tables (perhaps for a report) the query optimiser may not actually be able to optimise this in one hit, so temporary ...


13

A typical fact table in a star schema contains foreign key references to all dimension tables, so usually there wouldn't be any need for custom join conditions - they are determined automatically from foreign key references. For example a star schema with two fact tables would look like: Base = declarative_meta() class Store(Base): __tablename__ = ...


11

You could consider using a 64bit hash function to produce a bigint ID for each string, instead of using sequential IDs. With 64-bit hash codes, you can store 2^(32 - 7) or over 30 million items in your hash table before there is a 0.0031% chance of a collision. This would allow you to have identical IDs on all nodes, with no communication whatsoever ...


7

I have come across these types of dimension tables so far: Regular dimension Standard star dimension. Time Dimension A special case of the standard star dimension. Parent-child dimension Used to model hierarchical structures, fx BOM (bill of materials). Snowflake dimension Can also be used to model hierarchical structures. Degenerate dimensions ...


6

I am interpreting "programming the relationships" as meaning to put foreign key constraints on the tables. No, in a data warehouse you should not impose primary key or foreign key constraints on the fact tables. You've mentioned some issues, and another problem is that these constraints place a performance overhead when inserting rows, which will make the ...


6

The design of a star schema is always driven by the client's business needs. What are the questions asked? How fine-grained should the answers be? In you example, interesting questions might be "Number of Contracts by Branch or LoanManager" or "Managed sum of Loans by Branch or LoanManager". In this case, Branch and LoanManager would become your dimensions ...


6

First let's fix the model a bit. In your schema you have more attributes per dimension: id and name, you might end up having more details in the future. You can add them by specifying attributes as a list: "attriubtes": ["id", "name"]. Note also that the dimension is named as entity product not as a key id_product. The key id_product is just an attribute of ...


5

Star schemas are a natural fit for the last layer of a data warehouse. How you get there is another question. As far as I know, there are two big camps, those of Bill Inmon and Ralph Kimball. You might want to look at the theories of these two guys if/when you decide to go with a star. Also, some reporting tools really like the star schema setup. If you ...


5

Star schemas are used to enable high speed access to large volumes of data. The high performance is enabled by reducing the amount of joins needed to satsify any query that may be made against the subject area. This is done by allowing data redundancy in dimension tables. You have to remember that the star schema is a pattern for the top layer for the ...


5

The thing about star schemas is they are a natural model for the kinds of things most people want to do with a data warehouse. For instance it is easy to produce reports with different levels of granularity (month or day or year for example). It is also efficient to insert typical business data into a star schema, again a common and important feature of a ...


5

It really depends on what you are doing. I generally try to avoid them, but sometimes you need to do something complicated that takes multiple steps. Generally this is way beyond the simple select from table stuff. Like anything else it's a tool that you have to know when to use. I would agree with you that I normally let the db handle stuff behind the ...


5

Just imagine the horrible performance I get by comparing all strings to all other strings several times. When you've been doing this a while, you stop imagining performance, and you start measuring it. "Premature optimization is the root of all evil." What does "billion" mean to you? To me, in the USA, it means 1,000,000,000 (or 1e9). If that's ...


5

For data mining, you almost always have to prepare your data -- mostly as one "flat table". It may be a query, prepared view or CSV export -- depends on the tool and your preference. Now, to properly understand that article, one would probably have to smoke-drink the same thing as the author when he/she wrote it.


4

With just the little bit of info you've provided, I would recommend using a BigInt, which would take you up to 9,223,372,036,854,775,807, a number you're not likely to ever exceed. (Don't start with an INT and think you can easily change it to a BigInt when you exceed 2 billion rows. Its possible (I've done it), but can take an extremely long time, and ...


4

Well SSRS for SQL Server is designed to be used with cubes (we query our data warehouses with this all the time), but that is a vendor specific implementation and if you don't have SQL server you can't use it as it comes with SQL Server. You can write MDX queries and not just straight t-sql. I know you can reference other databases in queries, but I have ...


4

There are two things I would suggest you look at. First, use a batch insert to perform all of the associated inserts in one JDBC transaction. For more information: JDBC Batch Insert Example I would also strongly recommend that you use a JDBC connection pooling library. We use c3p0 with our Postgres database. You can find more information here: c3p0 ...


4

There is an ongoing debate in the datawarehousing litterature about where in the datawarehouse-architecture the Star-Schema design should be applied. In short Kimball advocates very highly for using only the Star-Schema design in the datawarehouse, while Inmon first wants to build an Enterprise Datawarehouse using normalized 3NF design and later use the ...


3

I have a complete presentation on dimensional modelling available at: http://www.jamessnape.me.uk/blog/2009/03/17/DimensionalModeling.aspx It's not exactly a complete Kimball course but a lot cheaper.


3

Star schema is a logical data model for relational databases that fits the regular data warehousing needs; if the relational environment is given, a star or a snowflake schema will be a good design pattern, hard-wired in lots of DW design methodologies. There are however other than relational database engines too, and they can be used for efficient data ...


3

Pentaho seems to be pretty solid, offering the whole suite of BI tools, with improved integration reportedly on the way. But...the chances are that companies wanting to go the open source route for their BI solution are also most likely to end up using open source database technology...and in that sense "database agnostic" can easily be a double-edged sword. ...


3

There is no need to split clients into two tables (dimensions). Simply put all clients, active and prospects into the same dimension table. You could then introduce an IsActive attribute (column) to distinguish between paying clients and prospects. Sooner or later you will use a data mining tool to learn more about clients and what distinguishes people who ...


3

I see temp tables as a sort of SQL code smell, to be used only as a last resort. If you are having to cache data before you get a final result set, then it usually indicates bad DB design to me.


3

I wouldn't consider doing the data manipulation anywhere other than in the database. most people try to work with database data using looping algorithms. if you need real speed, think of your data as a SET of rows and you can update thousands of rows within a single update. I have rewritten so many cursor loops written by novice programmers into single ...


3

Well without any specific details of what data you have in these tables, just a back of the napkin calculation shows that you're talking about processing over 6 million rows of information in the example you provided (2,000 rows * 300 rows * (1 row * 10 tables)). Are all of these rows distinct, or are the 10 tables lookup information that has a relatively ...


3

Your dimension table 'product' should look like this: surrogate_key | natural_key (productID) | Color | Material | Size | ... 1 5 red wood 20 ... 2 6 red ... If you have to many properties, try to group them in another dimension. For example Color and ...


3

Every dimension has: primary key (DateKey, TimeKey, ProductKey, ...) business key (FullDate, ProductFullName, ColorNaturalKey, ...) row with value 'unknown' (Key = 0, BusinessKey = 'unknown', all other = 'n/a') row with value 'n/a' (Key = -1, BusinessKey ='n/a', all other = 'n/a') In the Color table, columns Color, ColorFront and ColorBack all have ...


3

1) Whoever told you: So my 'productProperties' dimension table should have looked like this: Color | Material | Size was either wrong or you misunderstood. That idea is called a "Junk Dimension". And it doesn't have to contain the Cartesian product to begin with. It can be loaded like any other dimension. If a combination is needed in the fact table ...


3

Temp tables certainly have appropriate uses, they're not a code smell if they're used correctly. One of the nice things about them is that they live in tempdb, which is typically set to Simple recovery model. This means that if you're using temp tables for what they're good for (mostly bulk operations), you're generating a minimal amount of log compared to ...


3

Loading CSV data into a database is slow because it needs to read, split and validate the data. So what you should try is this: Setup a local database on each computer. This will get rid of the network latency. Load a different part of the data on each computer. Try to give each computer the same chunk. If that isn't easy for some reason, give each ...



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