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61

I just discovered that if your uncommitted changes are added to the index (i.e. "staged", using "git add ..."), then "git stash apply" (and, presumably, "git stash pop") will actually do a proper merge. If there are no conflicts, you're golden. If not, resolve them as usual with "git mergetool", or manually with an editor. To be clear, this is the process ...


21

Use bzr shelve and bzr unshelve commands.


18

Running git stash pop or git stash apply is essentially a merge. You shouldn't have needed to commit your current changes unless the files changed in the stash are also changed in the working copy, in which case you would've seen this error message: error: Your local changes to the following files would be overwritten by merge: file.txt Please, ...


11

You can use the patch command of your system. First you make a "stash" by storing a generated diff as .patch file: $scmtool diff > working.patch then reset your working directory. later, apply the patch with: patch -p1 --dry-run < working.patch and then this works, remove the --dry-run to apply the patch for real.


10

You can add the files with changes you want to keep, then stash the rest of the files and clear the stash: git add file2.cpp file2.h file3.cpp git stash --keep-index git stash clear (Keep in mind this will clear all of your stashes.) This will leave you with file2.cpp, file2.h, and file3.cpp staged for commit. If you then want to stash these files (and ...


8

Maybe not the kind of difference you were looking for, but there are two big differences between *main::foo and $main::{foo}; the former looks up the glob in the stash at compile time, creating it if necessary, while the latter looks for the glob in the stash at run time, and won't create it. This may make a difference to anything else poking about in the ...


8

The stash command was implemented in fossil recently. You got to check out latest fossil executable you will see stash in the available command list. Here is the link to the web help on its syntax.


8

Solved it! (With a little help from this question, but a slightly different solution.) Browse to the repository in Stash. Click the little 'https' icon in the address bar. Click Show Certificate. Drag the little certificate icon onto the desktop. Open the Keychain Access utility (type it into Finder). In the Keychains list, select the bold item, and under ...


7

The problem you are having comes down to the exp:channel:entries loop running multiple iterations, which then uses Stash to set an associative array of values. Once the channel:entries is compete, you have an array of {this_category_name} variables, so it's never actually set like a regular variable. So you really have a few options: Use a URI segment, ...


6

http://linux.die.net/man/1/git-reset git reset --hard


5

To expand on both their answers above, and just to be specific to your www.mysite.com/index.php/site/about_us request: You'd create a template group called "site" and then you may alternatively have something like this code in the /index template {embed="layout/.site"} {exp:channel:entries limit="1" disable="categories|member_data|pagination"} ...


5

A pull request signals that you want some changes in your branch merged to a target branch. One example might be that you make a new branch "my-feature" based on the current development branch (say, "master"). When you are done, you can push your branch to the remote repo and create a pull request from "my-feature" to "master". The pull request gives ...


4

A branch is just a separate version of the code. A pull request is when someone take the repo, makes their own branch, does some changes, then tries to merge that branch in (put their changes in the other person's code repository). (In the most general of terms.)


4

Any reason why you need to use context? I guess I'm not clear on how you are trying to use get_list to output the data. Would something like this achieve what you need to do?


4

When using Stash and the template partials approach (which I don't use personally), the files you mention are all embedded. You still use the same template groups and template files as before. The Stash-based approach is simply a different way of doing things within your existing templates - not a replacement for them.


4

You're hitting a compile time internal error ("Bad symbol for scalar"), this happens while Perl is trying to work out what '$Target::x' should be, which you can verify by running a debugging Perl with: perl -DT foo.pl ... ### 14:LEX_NORMAL/XOPERATOR ";\n" ### Pending identifier '$Target::x' Bad symbol for scalar at foo.pl line 14. I think the GV for ...


4

Generally what I'd do here is setup multiple Stash gets within the wrapper. Then in your individual templates you can set both the sidebar and the main content area. For parts where you might be repeating content, like the opening and closing divs of a sidebar, you can always drop some snippets inside the stash. You can also use exp:stash:not_empty [docs] ...


3

The following script: #!/usr/bin/env perl #mytest.pl no warnings; $bar = "this"; @bar = qw/ 1 2 3 4 5 /; %bar = qw/ key value /; open bar, '<', 'mytest.pl' or die $!; sub bar { return "Sub defined as 'bar()'"; } $main::{foo} = $main::{bar}; print "The scalar \$foo holds $foo\n"; print "The array \@foo holds @foo\n"; print "The hash \%foo holds ...


3

Accessing the stash as $A::{foo} = $obj allows you to place anything on the symbol table while *A::foo = $obj places $obj on the expected slot of the typeglob according to $obj type. For example: DB<1> $ST::{foo} = [1,2,3] DB<2> *ST::bar = [1,2,3] DB<3> x @ST::foo Cannot convert a reference to ARRAY to typeglob at (eval ...


3

Stashes should be viewable via git stash list or gitk --all also, git stash does not stash untracked files. If you did this and subsequently did a git checkout --force of another branch to overwrite untracked files with tracked ones in another branch, you have lost that content. The recommended way to stash is with git stash -u This will prevent ...


3

You can't change to another branch unless you clean your tree. This is done by committing your changes, reverting them or saving them to the stash.


3

In addition to Robin's answer, the recommended approach is that each developer creates a branch for each feature that they work on, based on the development branch. Then the pull request that is created represents exactly the changes that represent a particular feature or change. Once a pull request has been reviewed and merged into the development branch, ...


3

Pull requests let you tell others about changes you've pushed to a GitHub repository. Once a pull request is sent, interested parties can review the set of changes, discuss potential modifications, and even push follow-up commits if necessary. A separate version of the code is BRANCH


3

I usually use one wrapper for every template. It'll contain an {exp:stash:get name="content"} tag, like yours, which contains the only variable content within. In my individual templates, I embed the wrapper at the beginning using a regular EE embed ie. {embed="includes/wrapper"}. Then I stash the content to be inserted into the wrapper using the ...


3

Since you're just resetting the most recent commit it seems that you haven't done any other commits since the one that is problematic. Because of this you should be able to just fix the code, use git add on the changed files, then use git commit --amend to replace the existing merge commit. That will preserve the merge information.


3

I had a similar problem - you need to add your stash server to known_hosts on your jenkins server. Log onto your jenkins server and ssh to your stash server. This will add an entry for the stash server in your user's known_hosts file. Then copy the known_hosts file to $JENKINS_HOME/.ssh and change the file owner to jenkins.


3

When pushing, you always push one specific commit (usually the commit at the tip of your currently checked out branch). However, as the commit's hash partly consists of the commits it bases on (its parent commits), you have to push all parent commits also. And by pushing the parent commits you also have to push their parent commits and so on. So, you can ...


3

Personally I prefer just going straight to private (local) branches, but stashes work. Be aware of two things about stashes: They are their own commits. Except for the label, there's no fundamental difference between the "stash" commit and a commit tied to a branch or tag label. (A tag label has the form refs/tags/tag-foo; a branch has the form ...


2

You need to: clone the Bitbucket repo create a local branch for all Bitbucket branches push everything to Stash. That would means: git clone -o bitbucket https://bitbucket.org/username/reponame cd reponame remote=bitbucket ; for brname in `git branch -r | grep $remote | grep -v master | grep -v HEAD | awk '{gsub(/[^\/]+\//,"",$1); print $1}'`; do git ...


2

To import the project files, commit history etc, you can do something like: git clone --bare git@bitbucket.org:/login/myrepo.git cd myrepo.git git push --mirror git@stash.acme.com:/project/myrepo.git cd .. rm -rf myrepo.git



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