Hot answers tagged

40

The reviewer is wrong: citation("stats") The ‘stats’ package is part of R. To cite R in publications use: R Core Team (2013). R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. ISBN 3-900051-07-0, URL http://www.R-project.org/. A BibTeX entry for LaTeX users is @Manual{, title =...


30

stat_smooth does produce output that you can use elsewhere, and with a slightly hacky way, you can put it into a variable in the global environment. You enclose the output variable in .. on either side to use it. So if you add an aes in the stat_smooth call and use the global assign, <<-, to assign the output to a varible in the global environment you ...


28

Riffing off of @James example p <- qplot(hp,wt,data=mtcars) + stat_smooth() You can use the intermediate stages of the ggplot building process to pull out the plotted data. The results of ggplot_build is a list, one component of which is data which is a list of dataframes which contain the computed values to be plotted. In this case, the list is two ...


27

The accepted answer works but it's slow. There's no need to exec stat for each directory, find provides the modification date and you can just print it out directly. Here's an equivalent command that's considerably faster: find /var -maxdepth 2 -type d -printf "%p %TY-%Tm-%Td %TH:%TM:%TS %Tz\n"


25

example from google #include <unistd.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <sys/stat.h> #include <sys/types.h> int main(int argc, char **argv) { if(argc != 2) return 1; struct stat fileStat; if(stat(argv[1],&fileStat) < 0) return 1; printf("Information for %s\n",argv[1]); printf("--------...


20

You could use the -exec switch for find and define the output format of stat using the -c switch as follows: find /var -maxdepth 2 -type d -exec stat -c "%n %y" {} \; This should give the filename followed by its modification time on the same line of the output.


16

When you call stat you're querying the filesystem and will be limited by its performance. For large numbers of files this will be slow; it's not really a Perl issue.


16

You are using the synchronous version, which doesn't use a callback. It simply returns the result instead. So either use the async form fs.stat(path, callback) or use the sync form like this: var fs = require('fs'); console.log("+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++"); var stats = fs.statSync(pathname); console.log(stats.isDirectory()); console.log("++++...


15

Because the GNU libc implements open() and open64() as you'd expect (i.e. they're just dynamically linked symbols that you can hook into with LD_PRELOAD), but does something special with stat() and stat64(). If you look at the symbols exported by libc (e.g. with nm -D /libc/libc.so.6), you'll see that it doesn't actually provide the symbols stat or stat64! ...


15

The mode from your question corresponds to a regular file with 644 permissions (read-write for the owner and read-only for everyone else), but don’t take my word for it. $ touch foo $ chmod 644 foo $ perl -le 'print +(stat "foo")[2]' 33188 The value of $mode can be viewed as a decimal integer, but doing so is not particularly enlightening. Seeing the octal ...


13

Try signif. > signif(1.326135235e-09, digits = 3) [1] 1.33e-09


12

You're using S_ISREG() and S_ISDIR() correctly, you're just using them on the wrong thing. In your while((dit = readdir(dip)) != NULL) loop in main, you're calling stat on currentPath over and over again without changing currentPath: if(stat(currentPath, &statbuf) == -1) { perror("stat"); return errno; } Shouldn't you be appending a slash ...


12

This goes back a long way, all the way to the first C versions. They didn't have a seperate symbol table for structure members, the names were added to the global symbol table. With the obvious nasty global namespace pollution that causes. The workaround was the same one you use on enums today, prefix them with a couple of letters to avoid the name ...


11

The second-resolution times are in the fields: time_t st_atime; /* time of last access */ time_t st_mtime; /* time of last modification */ time_t st_ctime; /* time of last status change */ But "NOTES" section of the man http://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/online/pages/man2/stat.2.html says: Since kernel ...


11

You use getpwuid to look up the password file entry for a particular UID (which includes the user name, but now not the password itself) and getgrgid to look up the group file entry for a particular GID.


10

dirp->d_name is the name of the file in the directory: for example, "udpclient.c". The full name of the file is thus "/home/eipe/c/udpclient.c" - but your current working directory is /home/eipe, so stat() is trying to access "/home/eipe/udpclient.c", which doesn't exist. You can either change your working directory to argv[1] using chdir(), or you can ...


10

You are running foul of the "umask", a per-process setting which masks out permission bits in file and directory creation operations. There is no safe way to disable the umask. What you should do instead is create the directory with mode zero (i.e. all access denied) and then use chmod (the system call, not the shell command of the same name) to adjust the ...


9

It'll be executed only once and on next function call, it'll reference the same object, as you mentioned. Your first snippet is not thread-safe, by the way. If two threads call your function at the same time, they might end up running the constructor twice, which is not what you want. Using the second snippet relieves you from manually locking and ensuring ...


9

From the stat (2) man page: stat() stats the file pointed to by path and fills in buf. lstat() is identical to stat(), except that if path is a symbolic link, then the link itself is stat-ed, not the file that it refers to. In other words, the stat call will follow the symbolic link to the target file and retrieve the information for that. Try ...


9

This is because your /etc/termcap is a symlink. Let me demonstrate this to you: Bash: $ touch bar $ ln -s bar foo $ stat -f "%p %N" foo 120755 foo $ stat -f "%p %N" bar 100644 bar Python: >>> import os >>> oct(os.stat('foo').st_mode) '0100644' >>> oct(os.stat('bar').st_mode) '0100644' >>> oct(os.lstat('foo').st_mode) '...


8

Before you go off optimizing stat, use Devel::NYTProf to see where the real slow-down is. Also, investigate the details of how you've mounted the filesystem. Is everything local, or have you mounted something over NFS or something similar? There are many things that can be the problem, as other answers have pointed out. Don't spend too much time focussing ...


8

You use it in the same way you do for a file or filehandle: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; my $dir = shift; opendir(DIR, $dir) or die "Failed to open $dir: $!\n"; my @stats = stat DIR; closedir(DIR); my $atime = scalar localtime $stats[8]; print "Last access time on $dir: $atime\n"; The ability to use stat on directory handles was just added around Perl 5....


8

The time_t type represents the number of seconds that have passed since 1 January 1970 00:00 UTC (that moment in time is called the "epoch" and happened at the same moment everywhere around the world). You can consider "UTC" to mean the same thing as "GMT" (see Leap Second for detail about the very small differences). Be aware that instead of adding or ...


8

You need to pass a file descriptor, not a FILE *. int fstat(int fildes, struct stat *buf); Try using fileno(3) to get the file descriptor from a FILE *. int fd; fp = fopen("image.png", "rb"); fd = fileno(fp); fstat(fd, &sb);


8

The basics are simple enough; the tricky bits are the SUID and SGID bits and the sticky bit, which modify the 'x' bits. Consider splitting the permissions into 3 octal digits for user, group, owner, and using those to index into an array of 3-character strings such as rwx and ---. Then adjust the appropriate x bits based on the other mode bits. The file ...


8

bare Darwin' stat does not allow -c option, as it is a GNU extension. You shall instead download the gnu binutils, either from homebrew, from port or from fink, and then use gstat instead of stat. If you don't want to install gnu binutils, then stick to the standard BSD tools, thus : stat -f "%p" t.c will give the modes (in octal) and stat -f "%z" t.c ...


8

myfile->d_name is the file name not the path, so you need to append the file name to the directory "Downloads/file.txt" first, if it's is not the working directory: char buf[512]; while((myfile = readdir(mydir)) != NULL) { sprintf(buf, "%s/%s", argv[1], myfile->d_name); stat(buf, &mystat); .... As to why it prints 4096 that is the ...


8

In our recent book, my co-author and I did the R citation (in the frontmatter) but also got the publisher to let us give per-package credit as well: We felt that it was important to ensure those that did the work got credit all the way 'round. (I wld have made this only a comment, but can't easily embed pix that way and rly didn't want to host the img ...


8

You may want to use lstat() instead of stat() if you want to do stat on symbolic link itself. man stat has lstat() is identical to stat(), except that if path is a symbolic link, then the link itself is stat-ed, not the file that it refers to.


8

As noted, stat() works on filenames, while fstat() works on file descriptors. Why have two functions for that? One factor is likely to be convenience. It's just nice to be able to fstat() a file descriptor that you obtained from other parts of your code, without having to pass the filename too. The major reason is security, though. If you first stat() the ...



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