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69

The State Monad : a model of mutable state The State monad is a purely functional environment for programs with state, with a simple API: get put Documentation in the mtl package. The State monad is commonly used when needing state in a single thread of control. It doesn't actually use mutable state in its implementation. Instead, the program is ...


53

I assume, scalaz 7.0.x and the following imports (look at answer history for scalaz 6.x): import scalaz._ import Scalaz._ The state type is defined as State[S, A] where S is type of the state and A is the type of the value being decorated. The basic syntax to create a state value makes use of the State[S, A] function: // Create a state computation ...


38

The problem is that Control.Monad.State.Lazy's (>>=) is so lazy that even the ($!) doesn't help you. Try Control.Monad.State.Strict, that should reach the ($!). The (>>=) of the lazy state monad doesn't look at all at the (value,state) pair, so the only way to get some evaluation done before the end is reached is having the f in m >>= f deconstruct ...


36

There was many issues with your code snippet. I fixed your snippet adding explanation as to what was broken and added some style advice if you care. module Pass1_JFT where import Control.Monad.Identity import Control.Monad.State import Control.Monad.Writer import Data.Maybe import qualified Data.Map as Map {- replacing your import Types with simple ...


32

I've written multiple compilers in Haskell, and a state monad is a reasonable solution to many compiler problems. But you want to keep it abstract---don't make it obvious you're using a monad. Here's an example from the Glasgow Haskell Compiler (which I did not write; I just work around a few edges), where we build control-flow graphs. Here are the basic ...


30

I'd say that state in general is not a code smell, so long as it's kept small and well controlled. This means that using monads such as State, ST or custom-built ones, or just having a data structure containing state data that you pass around to a few places, is not a bad thing. (Actually, monads are just assistance in doing exactly this!) However, having ...


27

The State monad does look kind of confusing at first; let's do as Norman Ramsey suggested, and walk through how to implement from scratch. Warning, this is pretty lengthy! First, State has two type parameters: the type of the contained state data and the type of the final result of the computation. We'll use stateData and result respectively as type ...


24

Ok, I'll start with IORef. IORef provides a value which is mutable in the IO monad. It's just a reference to some data, and like any reference, there are functions which allow you to change the data it refers to. In Haskell, all of those functions operate in IO. You can think of it like a database, file, or other external data store - you can get and set ...


22

I don't use ST much, but sometimes it is just the best solution. This can be in many scenarios: There are already well-known, efficient ways to solve a problem. Quicksort is a perfect example of this. It is known for its speed and in-place behavior, which cannot be imitated by pure code very well. You need rigid time and space bounds. Especially with lazy ...


16

I was originally going to post this as a comment, but decided to expound a bit more. Strictly speaking, get doesn't "take" an argument. I think a lot of what is going on is masked by what you aren't seeing--the instance definitions of the State monad. get is actually a method of the MonadState class. The State monad is an instance of MonadState, providing ...


14

There is no difference between A. and B., they are the same thing by referential transparency. The core of the problem seems to be that you're interpreting them in the context of execution of stateful computations. In that context, the analogue of A that you're expecting is A': Produce a result list by 1. putting the result of the initial computation into ...


13

I stumbled on an interesting blog post Grok Haskell Monad Transformers from sigfp that has an example of applying two state monads through a monad transformer. Here is a scalaz translation. The first example shows a State[Int, _] monad: val test1 = for { a <- init[Int] _ <- modify[Int](_ + 1) b <- init[Int] } yield (a, b) val go1 = test1 ...


13

The State monad represents stateful computations i.e. computations that use values from, and perhaps modify, some external state. When you sequence stateful computations together, the later computations might give different results depending on how the previous computations modified the state. Since functions in Haskell must be pure (i.e. have no side ...


13

Each time you run a state transformer with runST, it operates on some local state that is separate from all other state transformers. runST creates a new state type and calls its argument with that type. So, for example, if you execute let x = runST (return ()) y = runST (return ()) in (x, y) then the first return () and second return () will have ...


12

In general you'll find that code winds up much clearer using one StateT with a larger composite structure for all of the bits of state that you need. One good reason is that when you come up with a piece of state you forgot you can always grow the structure by one field, and you can use the record sugar to write out single field updates or turn to something ...


12

Others have done the core things, but to answer the direct question: All this makes the line type ENV = IORef [(String, IORef LispVal)] confusing. Why the second IORef? What will break if I do type ENV = State [(String, LispVal)] instead? Lisp is a functional language with mutable state and lexical scope. Imagine you've closed over a mutable ...


12

This is a perfect time to pull out the Reader monad—it abstracts the notion of some globally available, read-only configuration data. data Config = Config { size :: Int, ... } type MyMonad = Reader Config fun :: MyMonad Result fun = funNeedingTheSize <$> asks size <*> pure arg1 <*> pure arg2 runMyMonad :: Config -> MyMonad a -> a ...


11

With the map-with-accumulator combinator (the easy way) The higher-order function you want is mapAccumL. It's in Haskell's standard library, but for Scala you'll have to use something like Scalaz. First the imports (note that I'm using Scalaz 7 here; for previous versions you'd import Scalaz._): import scalaz._, syntax.std.list._ And then it's a ...


11

I don't think so: crash = runSTCont crasher where crasher :: forall s. (forall b . ST s b -> b) -> Integer crasher go = let r :: forall a. STRef s (a -> a) r = go $ newSTRef id in go $ do writeSTRef r (tail . tail) f <- readSTRef r return $ f (17 :: Integer) The problem is that Haskell lacks ...


10

Update: I should have mentioned that there's actually a much nicer way to do this that doesn't require State or monads at all: takeStep :: (Double, StdGen) -> (Double, StdGen) takeStep (p, g) = let (d, g') = random g in (p + d, g') takeSteps n = take n . tail . map fst $ iterate takeStep (0, mkStdGen 0) It works as desired: *Main> takeSteps 5 ...


10

's. 's -> ('a * 's) is an universal type. You're going to have a hard time implementing a state with universal types... There's no clean way of encapsulating an existential type there without using a module (because existential types is what abstract types are for). You could, of course, publish the state type instead: type ('a,'s) state = { state : ...


10

The () is the return value of the action. Since put is used for its side effect (change state), it doesn't return anything useful.


10

A simple State monad is defined as: data State s a = State (s -> (a, s)) This represents a self-contained and deterministic stateful computation. Considering [] as a non-determinism monad, you can have [State s a] which represents a non-deterministic set of deterministic computations, or State s [a] which represents a deterministic computation ...


10

Yes, it's gone, replaced by StateT. (The State monad is now defined in terms of the StateT monad transformer.) You should be using the state function instead. I would question whether your approach is correct, however. Instead of worrying about how State is implemented, consider using do-notation and the get and put functions.


10

Okay, you've smooshed a bunch of questions into one post... 1. Where does the lambda parameter s come from? return x = SimpleState $ \s -> ( x, s ) If you look at your constructor, SimpleState, you'll notice that it takes a function of type Int -> (a, Int) as an argument. So the lambda is used in order to give us a function of the correct type. ...


9

First of all I have to ask are you just claiming it's going to be slow or did you profile or at least notice a performance issue? otherwise guessing or making assumptions isn't particuarly useful. Anyway I recommend grouping your data, at the moment it looks like you're just laying out your structure completely flat when you could group related data like the ...


9

Algorithms which make use of mutation and algorithms which do not are different algorithms. Sometimes there is a strightforward bounds-preserving translation from the former to the latter, sometimes a difficult one, and sometimes only one which does not preserve complexity bounds. A skim of the paper reveals to me that I don't think it makes essential use ...


9

Layering multiple state monads on top of each other is a bad idea: you will have to compose a bunch of lifts to get at each piece of state, identified only by the number of layers down the stack it is. Yuck! Indeed, the mtl library in general is designed to be used, with rare exceptions, with one monad transformer of each "kind" in a stack. Instead, I would ...


9

What you want is StateT s IO (String, Bool), where StateT is provided by both Control.Monad.State (from the mtl package) and Control.Monad.Trans.State (from the transformers package). This general phenomenon is called a monad transformer, and you can read a great introduction to them in Monad Transformers, Step by Step. There are two approaches to defining ...


9

Let's imagine we were to IO-ify the State monad. What would that look like? Our pure State monad is just a newtype around: s -> (a, s) Well, the IO version might do a little bit of side effects before returning the final values, which would look like: s -> IO (a, s) That pattern is so common it has a name, specifically StateT: newtype StateT s ...



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