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72

If your project was built using Cordova 2.x and Xcode 4.x, and you are receiving the error mentioned by the OP, this solution worked for me. (I was experiencing the error with Cordova 2.5 and Xcode 5). https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/CB-3768 Go to your Cordova Project Root Folder -> CordovaLib -> Right Click CordovaLib.xcodeproj -> Show Package ...


41

Yes, an arm64 slice is there. To see it, you need to use lipo from the iOS toolchain, not from the host system (which doesn’t know about arm64): xcrun -sdk iphoneos lipo -info $(FILENAME)


22

Add the libz.dylib as the Link Binary With Libraries. Build Phases > Link Binary With Libraries > push the + button > search the libz.dylib and select it > push the Add button.


20

The answer from Vladimir is actually pretty good, however, I'd like to give some more background knowledge here. Maybe one day somebody finds my reply and may find it helpful. The compiler transforms source files (.c, .cc, .cpp, .m) into object files (.o). There is one object file per source file. Object files contain symbols, code and data. Object files ...


15

For XCode 5. These answers seem a bit out of date. You can see the main steps here http://www.raywenderlich.com/41377/creating-a-status-library-in-ios-tutorial . But Xcode 5 does a lot more work for you and now works nearly as you want it to. 1.Create new Static Library App in Xcode 2.You can delete any files it creates and add your own. Add your methods ...


10

If you don't want to import it as a module but simply use it as a dependency you can create a jar using ant. In your volley directory just type ant jar and you will find a volley.jar in YOUR_VOLLEY_DIRECTORY/bin (you need to install apache ant if you don't have it) You can copy the jar in the libs directory in your android app project (or create a libs ...


9

I have removed armv7s from valid architectures section and worked for me. Build Settings --> Architectures --> Valid Architectures


9

one additional notes is: Build Active Architectures Only set to no is for the lib project.


8

Looking at OpenCV's CMakeLists.txt, it appears as if you're using the wrong names for the OpenCV CMake options. BUILD_SHARED_LIBRARIES should be BUILD_SHARED_LIBS and BUILD_PYTHON_SUPPORT should be BUILD_opencv_python


7

Edit the release and debug configurations of your build target. Include the debug version of the library in the debug config, and the non-debug version for the release target. Don't include both in the same config--this is why you're getting duplicate symbols. Remove the two libraries from your build targets, eg: Then search for "other linker flags" in ...


7

It is not entirely impossible. The chief problem is that you'll inevitably end up with two distinct copies of the runtime library. Copies that each keep their own state and use their own memory allocator. The DLL interface has to be carefully designed to avoid the possible mishaps that can cause. Hard rules are that you can never throw an exception from ...


7

You can go via CReal. isqrt :: Integer -> Integer isqrt = floor . (sqrt :: CReal -> CReal) . fromInteger


7

Compile with warnings and the compiler will tell you why it's wrong. You don't have a prototype for the function call so when you call it from main it gets an implicit int return type which isn't what it actually returns.


6

Even if you don't want to share your code with other developers, you can still gain tremendous benefits from creating a static library. As Srikar Appal mentions, benefits gained from creating a static library are 1) Code Distribution, 2) Code Reuse, and I'd also like to add, 3) Versioning, 4) Testability (kudos to BergQuester's comments below) and 5) ...


6

You can't do this. You have two options: Recompile the library as a shared library. Then use ctypes to call methods from the dynamically-loaded shared library. Build a Python Extension.


5

In my opinion creating a static library has the following benefits - Code distribution - This is the biggest reason (perhaps the only reason) developers create a static library. It obfuscates the actual code and exposes the API methods. But since you have explicitly mentioned that this "library package" would never be distributed to 3rd party developers ...


5

But everything works well with other C programs linking this library. Did you notice that C and C++ compilation create different symbol names on object file level? It's called 'name mangling'. The (C++) linker would show undefined references as demangled symbols in the error message, which might confuse you. If you inspect your test.o file with nm -u ...


5

I managed to add the static library as a subspec. I prefer this approach because it uses the build shipped with my pod by default, and also enables users to provide their own build if they so desire. As mentioned, the static library is OpenSSL but the following applies to any static library. I'm using the following directory structure: ...


5

Assuming you are generating a shared library, most probably what happens is that the variant of liblog4cplus.a you are using wasn't compiled with -fPIC. In linux, you can confirm this by extracting the object files from the static library and checking their relocations: ar -x liblog4cplus.a readelf --relocs fileappender.o | egrep '(GOT|PLT|JU?MP_SLOT)' ...


5

Here is a good solution I found: Static Libs With Support to iOS 5 and Arm64 Edited: The solution is to build different architectures separated then bind them using lipo, by using command line (or Rakefile). First build the binary with arm using xcodebuild: xcodebuild -project 'StaticLibDemo.xcodeproj' -configuration 'Release' -sdk 'iphoneos7.0' clean ...


5

In short, the only good way of distributing prebuilt libraries is by not including any of the dependencies, but leaving that up to the user. I.e. in your example, you would instruct your users how to also add AFNetworking to their project. The same basically applies regarding the dummy files. Having said that, you could of course go for multiple prebuilt ...


5

I don't really see how this question covers new territory. Everything that Steve-o quoted that Microsoft Support told him is accurate. His conclusion is not, you can certainly call Microsoft Support about it and ask for help. It is a waste of money, they'll unequivocally tell you that you must select the v120_xp toolset. It is really rather ...


5

Static library targets can not link against dylibs. Previously this was simply ignored. You need to remove said dylib from the static library target and, if necessary, add it to each target that is building the actual app. Look into the Link Binary with Libraries Build Phase. Knowing cocos2d there's probably an Other Linker Flag "-lz" that you need to ...


5

Use dlsym to get the C function pointers by function name. If it can find them, they're there. Otherwise they're not. Just use RTLD_DEFAULT as the first parameter. EDIT: having cast around for an iOS example, see Mike Ash's write up of PLWeakCompatibility, particularly the section on 'Falling Through'. You'll see he checks whether objc_loadWeakRetained (a ...


5

Let us say that your code is a file named main.cpp which looks like this: #include<headerFromSomeLibrary> #include<headerFromSomeOtherLibrary> int main() { int var = functionFromTheLibrary(); int otherVar = functionFromTheOtherLibrary(); return var + otherVar; } Compilation will take place in two steps. First, you will compile ...


5

Libraries you want to link in needs to come after the object files that uses anything in those libraries, so @$(LINKER) $@ $(LFLAGS) -L$(LIBDIR) $(LIBFLAG) $(OBJECTS) should be @$(LINKER) $@ $(LFLAGS) -L$(LIBDIR) $(OBJECTS) $(LIBFLAG)


4

This is by design. When building a static library, any dependencies to that library will not get linked into the library directly. Instead when building an executable all library dependencies (direct and indirect) will be linked directly to that executable. This is also the way most compiler handle static libraries. While VS does offer a special option to ...


4

The order of flags to the compiler matters. You need to put the -l flag after your source file names: $ g++ -Ibreakpad/src -Llibs -o main main.cpp -lbreakpad_client From the GCC documentation: It makes a difference where in the command you write this option; the linker searches and processes libraries and object files in the order they are specified. ...


4

Because my lib.a is for only armv7 what i did was Active Architecture Only = yes buildSettings = { ALWAYS_SEARCH_USER_PATHS = NO; "ARCHS[sdk=iphoneos*]" = ( armv7s, armv7, ); "ARCHS[sdk=iphoneos6.*]" = ( armv7s, ...


4

Change the order: gcc main.c -o main -lsb -lsa



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