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No, not in a way to satisfy the NIST FIPS 140-2 spec. The only solution to achieve what I was after is to use a shared lib within which an initialisation function is called with a constructor attribute (or a modified .init ELF hook, but constructors are clearer). This ensures the initialisation is called before the app starts. As archive libs are just a ...


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After doing the cmake statement Verify whether the output of cmake includes the following text: V4L/V4L2: Using libv4l. If it is not there, then install v4l2ucp, v4l-utils and libv4l-dev from synaptic package manager. Then cmake and build again. This worked for me but I was using OpenCV with python bindings on Ubuntu 12.04.


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RTFM... or RTFRN... Xcode 6 release notes "Xcode will no longer pass options in the build setting OTHER_LDFLAGS to libtool when building static libraries, nor will it pass options in OTHER_LIBTOOLFLAGS to the Mach-O linker when building any other kind of product. Previously all options in both settings would be passed to both tools. Make sure that options ...


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Currently Android doesn't support all Java 7 features so forget about Java 8. I mentioned Java 7 because Files was introduced in Java 7. Some features like multi-catch are supported by Android(and starting with Kitkat try-with-resources ) but Files class is not. Note that Google doesn't use Oracle Java.


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The problem was that I had managed to put all four projects into the same directory. Apparently, certain parts of the build process use metafiles or temporary files that use compiler-specific names instead of project-specific names, and having multiple projects using the same compiler in one directory means that those files get reused and overwritten. The ...


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A most common way is to expose initialization functions that the user of your library must first invoke before using your library. In C++ you can have global objects with constructors and destructors. When these objects are in a static library though, they need to be referred to, otherwise the linker may exclude them as they are not being referenced. Also, ...


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The error message you're getting indicates that it thinks you're trying to add a link library for the project /path/to/libcrypto.a, not that you are trying to add the link library /path/to/libcrypto.a to the project $(CURPROJECT). This might be because you need to do ${CURPROJECT} (cmake variables use {} not ()). It could also be that the variable ...


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Have you already tested the "experimental" built-in openssl support described here: Firebreath libraries


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PROJECT sets some important variables about the plarform. Don't call FIND_* modules before setting a name to PROJECT.


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Ok, it's the good old "order makes a difference". Instead of: g++ -I /usr/local/include/ -L/usr/local/lib /usr/local/lib/libcityhash.a cityHash.cpp -o city you should do: g++ -I /usr/local/include/ -L/usr/local/lib cityHash.cpp -o city -lcityhash (libraries and object files are processed in the order of appearance in the command line, and since none ...


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I had a similar issue trying to statically compile a simple DES program using the openssl lib. I used "-lcrypto -lz -ldl -static-libgcc" and it worked for me. No warnings or errors.


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Using -Wl,-Bdynamic and -Wl,-Bstatic instead of just using -Bdynamic and -Bstatic solved the problem. The full link line looks like this now: g++ -O0 -g test.cpp testObject.o -pthread -Bdynamic -I/home/user/devel/lmx-sdk-4.7.1/include/ -L/home/user/devel/lmx-sdk-4.7.1/linux_x64 -llmxclient -lrt -ldl -Wl,-Bstatic -lboost_filesystem -lboost_system -o $@ ...


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bigD's answer is right. The place you would actually do this, in VS 2012 at least, is by right-clicking on the project, then going: Properties > Configuration Properties > Linker > Command Line > Additional Options In that box, you would just type: "[libFolder]\*.lib" You can have multiple locations by separating locations with a space, like so: ...


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The virtual address of .tbss is meaningless as that section only serves as a template for the TLS storage as allocated by the threading implementation in GLIBC. The way this virtual address comes into place is that .tbss follows .tbdata in the default linker script: ... .gcc_except_table : ONLY_IF_RW { *(.gcc_except_table .gcc_except_table.*) } /* Thread ...


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This is rather simple if you have an understanding about two things: 1) What is SHT_NOBITS 2) What is tbss section SHT_NOBITS means that this section occupies no space inside file. Normally, NOBITS sections, like bss are placed after all PROGBITS sections at the end of the loaded segments. tbss is special section to hold uninitialized thread-local data ...


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You can use -Bstatic to statically link what comes after it, then -Bdynamic to do the opposite. As many times as you need on the command line.


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The problem your running into is that you've configured the compiler to use static C runtime library LIBCMT.lib but some object file that you're linking with has requested that it be linked a default library. Specfically msvcrt.lib, the dynamic C runtime library. Because the two libraries define the same set of symbols you get multiply defined errors. A ...


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The static library FLTK is correctly linked, but it also requires to be linked to Win32 API to work on windows. You have to link to Gdi32.dll as well.


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There is an old question in stackoverflow which issues a very similar problem, take a look here: error LNK2005: xxx already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\something\LIBCMT.lib(setlocal.obj) Here another link: LNK2005 errors with LIBCMTD.lib and MSVCRTD.lib I hope it helps you!


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Problems like this are quite common with Visual C++, and it's not easy to describe exactly what to do to fix them. You need to take great care and really understand which libraries you are including, and there isn't enough info here to work it out. One common cause is using the wrong runtime library. In VS that would be the difference between the /MT and ...


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Static libraries mean that instead of your executable linking to external library files (on Windows they are DLLs), they are now lumped into your actual executable. This is a good thing if there are reasons you don't want to distribute DLLs separately, but it also completely wastes the benefits of DLLs such as being able to swap them out individually instead ...


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You can add suitable LIBS += -l... and INCLUDEPATH += /usr/... to your .pro


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We can ship the program with binary + dynamical libraries, no problem, but i would rather see single static binary with no dependencies. What is the problem you are trying to solve? You can follow the model most commercial applications on Linux do: put your executable, shared libraries and other resources in one directory (possibly with ...


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There are programs for MS Windows that can do so, eg DLL to Lib and DLL to Static Lib. In the open source world, there isn't really much of an incentive to develop such a tool as you can always recompile from source (but of course it's possible that someone somewhere did it anyway).


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It's because dynamic libraries and static libraries are two different things. A static library is just an archive of object files (much like a zip archive). A dynamic library is more like an executable program. So you can't really link anything into a static library, you can only add more object files.



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