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712

Yep, using the staticmethod decorator class MyClass(object): @staticmethod def the_static_method(x): print x MyClass.the_static_method(2) # outputs 2 Note that some code might use the old method of defining a static method, using staticmethod as a function rather than a decorator. This should only be used if you have to support ancient ...


522

Maybe a bit of example code will help: Notice the difference in the call signatures of foo, class_foo and static_foo: class A(object): def foo(self,x): print "executing foo(%s,%s)"%(self,x) @classmethod def class_foo(cls,x): print "executing class_foo(%s,%s)"%(cls,x) @staticmethod def static_foo(x): print ...


496

Though classmethod and staticmethod are quite similar, there's a slight difference in usage for both entities: classmethod must have a reference to a class object as the first parameter, whereas staticmethod can have no parameters at all. Let's look at all that was said in real examples. Boilerplate Let's assume an example of a class, dealing with date ...


460

A staticmethod is a method that knows nothing about the class or instance it was called on. It just gets the arguments that were passed, no implicit first argument. It is basically useless in Python -- you can just use a module function instead of a staticmethod. A classmethod, on the other hand, is a method that gets passed the class it was called on, or ...


318

One rule-of-thumb: ask yourself "does it make sense to call this method, even if no Obj has been constructed yet?" If so, it should definitely be static. So in a class Car you might have a method double convertMpgToKpl(double mpg) which would be static, because one might want to know what 35mpg converts to, even if nobody has ever built a Car. But void ...


270

Because "abstract" means: "Implements no functionality", and "static" means: "There is functionality even if you don't have an object instance". And that's a logical contradiction.


205

Overriding depends on having an instance of a class. The point of polymorphism is that you can subclass a class and the objects implementing those subclasses will have different behaviors for the same methods defined in the superclass (and overridden in the subclasses). A static method is not associated with any instance of a class so the concept is not ...


181

Define static methods in the following scenarios only: If you are writing utility classes and they are not supposed to be changed. If the method is not using any instance variable. If any operation is not dependent on instance creation. If there is some code that can easily be shared by all the instance methods, extract that code into a static method. If ...


174

Rostyslav Dzinko's answer is very appropriate. I thought I could highlight one other reason you should choose @classmethod over @staticmethod. In the example above, Rostyslav used the @classmethod from_string as a Factory to create Date objects from otherwise unacceptable parameters. The same can be done with @staticmethod as is shown in the code below: ...


161

There are two questions here: Why can't interfaces contain static methods? Why can't static methods be overridden? There is no technical reason why an interface couldn't support static methods. This is summed up nicely by the poster of the question you duplicated. One of the comments I made there emphasizes this point. In the end, I think this was just ...


132

Static methods versus Instance methods 10.2.5 Static and instance members of the C# Language Specification explains the difference. Generally, static methods can provide a very small performance enhancement (not to mention a memory saving depending on the number of instances your class might expect to create) over instance methods, but only in somewhat ...


129

Performance, namespace pollution etc are all secondary in my view. Ask yourself what is logical. Is the method logically operating on an instance of the type, or is it related to the type itself? If it's the latter, make it a static method. Only move it into a utility class if it's related to a type which isn't under your control. Sometimes there are ...


118

I used to love utility classes filled up with static methods. They made a great consolidation of helper methods that would otherwise lie around causing redundancy and maintenance hell. They're very easy to use, no instantiation, no disposal, just fire'n'forget. I guess this was my first unwitting attempt at creating a service oriented architecture - lots of ...


109

You can't use a class's generic type parameters in static methods or static fields. The class's type parameters are only in scope for instance methods and instance fields. For static fields and static methods, they are shared among all instances of the class, even instances of different type parameters, so obviously they cannot depend on a particular type ...


93

I prefer such helper methods to be private static; which will make it clear to the reader that they will not modify the state of the object. My IDE will also show calls to static methods in italics, so I will know the method is static without looking the signature.


86

By default, use namespaced functions. Classes are to build objects, not to replace namespaces. In Object Oriented code Scott Meyers wrote a whole Item for his Effective C++ book on this topic, "Prefer non-member non-friend functions to member functions". I found an online reference to this principle in an article from Herb Sutter: ...


75

It might result in slightly smaller bytecode, since the static methods won't get access to this. I don't think it makes any difference in speed (and if it did, it would probably be too small to make a difference overall). I would make them static, since I generally do so if at all possible. But that's just me. EDIT: This answer keeps getting downvoted, ...


75

There's two kinds of common static methods: A "safe" static method will always give the same output for the same inputs. It modifies no globals, and doesn't call any "unsafe" static methods of any class. Essentially, you are using a limited sort of functional programming -- don't be afraid of these, they're fine. An "unsafe" static method mutates global ...


71

Just use TheClassName.class instead of getClass().


71

I think that Steven is actually right. To answer the original question, then, in order to set up a class method, simply assume that the first argument is not going to be a calling instance, and then make sure that you only call the method from the class. For example: class Dog: count = 0 # this is a class variable dogs = [] # this is a class ...


68

Use :: instead of . MyObject o = MyMath::calcSomething(); When you are calling the method without the object of the class you should use :: notation. You may also call static method via class objects or pointers to them, in this case you should use usual . or -> notation: MyObject obj; MyObject* p = new MyObject(); MyObject::calcSomething(); ...


67

You can't override a static method, so making it abstract would be meaningless. Moreover, a static method in an abstract class would belong to that class, and not the overriding class, so couldn't be used anyway.


60

I find that comment very useful as it points out two important things: It makes me ask myself if the method in question should actually be part of the type or not. Since it doesn't use any instance data, you should at least consider if it could be moved to its own type. Is it an integral part of the type, or is it really a general purpose utility method? ...


59

Java doesn't know what T is until you instantiate a type. Maybe you can execute static methods by calling Clazz.doit(something) but it sounds like you can't. The other way to handle things is to put the type parameter in the method itself: static <U> void doIt(U object) which doesn't get you the right restriction on U, but it's better than ...


58

I prefer the static way. Since the Class is not representing an object it doesn't make sense to make an instance of it. Classes that only exist for their methods should be left static.


56

Personally I think this is a flaw in the design of Java. Yes, yes, I understand that non-static methods are attached to an instance while static methods are attached to a class, etc etc. Still, consider the following code: public class RegularEmployee { private BigDecimal salary; public void setSalary(BigDecimal salary) { this.salary = ...


55

So my question is why are they called class methods instead of a static method? What is the difference between a static method and a class method? From Wikipedia: Static methods neither require an instance of the class nor can they implicitly access the data (or this, self, Me, etc.) of such an instance. This describes exactly what Objective-C's ...


53

If you're looking for a 1 liner that is equivalent to this.GetType() for static methods, try the following. Type t = MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().DeclaringType Although this is likely much more expensive than just using typeof(TheTypeName).


50

Yes, check out the staticmethod decorator: >>> class C: ... @staticmethod ... def hello(): ... print "Hello World" ... >>> C.hello() Hello World



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