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0

static keyword for a method implies its a class level. If keyword like static is not used for a method it means instance level,so create instance and then access it.


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There are a couple of ways to do this: Non-static Remove the static keyword of the method print and create an instance of the class SimplePrint simplePrint = new SimplePrint(); and just do this simplePrint.print(""); Or combine the above into a single line: new SimplePrint().print(""); Static You keep the print method static and just do this ...


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You need to call the method in your class using static::doCurlRequest(). staticExpects uses late static binding to create the mock. Because of this, the method needs to be called via static rather than self or $this-> which will call the actual method. Your class needs to look like this: class MyClass{ public static function create($data){ ...


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instead of the derived class using static new bool InitClass(), why not use a standard static constructor? static bool init = false; static Derived() { Console.WriteLine("derived init"); init = true; } See C# Static Constructor


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You probably have PHP running with E_STRICT error reporting. Try turning it off and see if that fixed the problem - like turn of error reporting for E_STRICT errors. See this post on SO : <?php error_reporting(E_ALL ^ E_STRICT); But I have to say, it's a bad idea to mix object-style and static-style calls. Function calls should explicitly show that a ...


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this is to be set in Web.config and <%@ outputcache duration="1" varybyparam="none" %> this to be removed all the .aspx Forms.. Regards Rs


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This is an opinion based question, so this is just my opinion as an answer. I would go with non static class methods. The reason for me is that these can be abstracted into a interface - perhaps repository pattern if you want to be more formal. Once I have this defined as an interface, I can firstly mock the implementation if unit testing is required (IMHO ...


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It does not make sense to compare apples and pears. There is no "better" or "worse" here, only situative decisions: Whenever you have access to the source code of the class and the method you want to add implements a core concern, use OOP (edit: fix typo, earlier I had written "AOP"). If you do not have access to the source code and inheritance is not a ...


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IMO Static method ITDs are really only useful for code generation (spring roo is an example) akin to C# partial classes keeping the code generator code in a separate file from the developers code. And yes the first approach is a myriad of ways better than the second approach.


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It shows correct result. Trace of static X changes: Line 14, initialization of A::x, x == 5 Line 17, instance of A in main(), x == 7 Line 18, new temporary instance of A as result of casting integer: A(3), x == 3 When you call put_x, it calculates sum of x (now it's 3) and value y (-3) of temporary object. Result is 0 as expected.


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you should be sure that file_get_contents returns a json string with object inside and has no errors. So you should check: $data = json_decode ($json); if (is_object($data) && $data->error != true) { return $data->album_id; } return false;


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Static methods are created in method area, and is the first to be created. Instance variables are created in heap after static methods are created. Hence, accessing instance variables directly is not possible. Always make use of an object to access such variables.


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Overriding in Java simply means that the particular method would be called based on the run time type of the object and not on the compile time type of it (which is the case with overriden static methods). As static methods are class methods they are notinstance methods so they have nothing to do with the fact which reference is pointing to which Object or ...


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Though you cannot use that in static method, pass that as a method parameter. Not sure about the type of getApplicationContext(), assuming that to be ApplicationContext public static void receiveResults2(ApplicationContext contx,String result3) {} String comparison should be done using .equals() or .equalsIgnoreCase()


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You can pass the context as a parameter to the static method. You should also fix your String comparison (use equals and not ==).


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It's a question of your project's architecture and design how your ViewModels should look like and where/how they should be initialized. It seems that right now your ViewModels are DTOs and you initialize them with a factory approach. That is fine, but I'd suggest to actually embrace the abstract factory pattern then and make sure that the factory ...


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If you have a class: public class ViewTicket extends Activity { public static <result> recieveResults(Context context, String result2) { ViewTicket ticket = (ViewTicket) context; return <result> } public void getTickets(<result> result) { // user <result> as you wish. SharedPreference ...


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Your ViewModels should be just DTOs, classes with properties only. No logic. Put logic in other classes (services or full business logic, depends) and have them populate the ViewModel. I'm aware to the fact that this answer seems very short relative to the substantial design consideration, but that's the core of it. For reasoning etc. please have a look at ...


1

C does not support nested functions, simple as that. To answer the question in comment about gcc non-standard nested functions and static keyword: as explained in the gcc manual (link credit to the other answer): A nested function always has no linkage. Declaring one with extern or static is erroneous. In other words, static keyword does not work, ...


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This is called "nested function". It's not supported in C. Some compilers, such as gcc, offer it as language extension. You do not need the static keyword though.


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The easiest way to use a non-threadsafe instance method without any threading problems is to have that instance only visible to one thread (just don't put a reference to it in a static or anywhere else where a thread other than that which created it is going to access it). Indeed, this happens more than 90% of the time without any special effort to do so. ...


1

The specific examples you are referring to are designed to be thread safe. That is they allow concurrent access without deadlocks or race conditions. This may not be the case in all instances of all classes, as such Microsoft have chosen to explicitly state which methods are thread safe and which are not to avoid any ambiguity. See the final paragraph - ...


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The framework methods you mention are not thread-safe just from the fact they are static, but because they have been specifically designed to be thread-safe. Thread-safety is often hard to achieve, but it's usually necessary for static methods, since any state they mutate is shared between threads. The sample method you posted isn't thread-safe, because it ...


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The fact that you ask that question should make you think about the design. I see no reason why isSameMonth should be a static method if every usage is connected with the preserved instance. Not strictly an answer to the question in the topic, but apparently it helped


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timesheet is not a local variable, it is a static field of the class. And your IDE suggests you to change timesheet.isSameMonth() to Timesheet.isSameMonth() because that method is static and it's better to access it in that (static) way. If timesheet would not be static, you would have already get another compile error saying that the static isSameMonth() ...


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No. There is no need change your code other than the method calling style Timesheet.isSameMonth(). Since that is a static method, the style of invoking the method by convenience is with Class name, rather than the instance variable. Otherwise, the people reading your code might thinks that it is a instance method. That is why it is a suggestion by IDE to ...


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It works either way, but the convention is to refer to static methods via the class name : Timesheet.isSameMonth() This makes it clear to someone who reads your code that you are calling a static method.


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A simpler way to test if the constructor was called without new is this: function TestIt() { if (!(this instanceof TestIt)) { throw "this function must be called with the new operator"; } } As for the static methods, you should perhaps define them on the class (constructor) instead of on the prototype. Properties defined on the prototype are ...


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The create method of the PsychoDB class is not static. this means that instead of public static function create($parameters) { } it's defined as public function create($parameters) { } To solve this, you can convert the method to static by using the first example, but be careful. If there are references to class variables ($this->) in the ...



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