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I understood your problem as: You have two sequences of points in a 2D plane. The true curves can be approximated by straight lines between consecutive points of the sequences. You want to know how often and where the two curves intersect (not only come into contact but really cross each other) (polygon intersection). A potential solution is: You look ...


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MAP simply returns a posterior mode, while the NormalApproximation uses a quadratic Taylor series approximation to the posterior, and so can return both the expected value and the covariance matrix. Of course, it uses a normal distribution to approximate the posterior, which may not be appropriate.


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The inverse link function is just f(x) = 1/x. If you create a family object with the command fam <- quasi(link = "inverse") the link function is set to the inverse function: fam$linkfun # function (mu) # 1/mu # <environment: namespace:stats> By default, the link function for quasi is "identity", i.e., f(x) = x. The details of quasi can be ...


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You might also consider using clistats. It is a highly configurable command line interface tool to compute statistics for a stream of delimited input numbers. I/O options Input data can be from a file, standard input, or a pipe Output can be written to a file, standard output, or a pipe Output uses headers that start with "#" to enable piping to gnuplot ...


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There is no single best approach to this problem. But outlined below is an approach which will work. The generalized non-parametric approach: Go through the algorithm for creating 'Constrained cubic splines' These are splines with a 'no overshoot/undershoot guarantee' with a very small sacrifice of smoothness You do not need to create the full splines, ...


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Define a new column, zGroup to group by. (The data in this example is a little different than yours) #create some data dt<-data.table(x=rep(c(1,2),each=4), y=rep(c(1,2),each=2,times=2), z=rep(c(1,2,3,4),times=2),t=1:8) #add a zGroup column dt[0<z & z<=2, zGroup:=1] dt[2<z & z<=3, zGroup:=2] dt[3<z ...


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The RRD data type COUNTER will convert the input data into a rate, by taking the difference between this sample and the last sample, and dividing by the time interval (note that data normalisation also takes place and this is dependent on the Interval setting of the RRD) Thus, updating with a constantly increasing count will result in a rate-of-change value ...


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Tuning is an adaptive procedure for optimizing the variance of the proposal distribution with the Metropolis sampler. You definitely want to tune. I don't change my tuning interval at all, but there are scenarios where it might help, I suppose.


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you can try this instead [m,n] = size(X); estimated_mean = sum(X)/m; tmp=zeros(m,n); for i=1:n tmp(:,i)= ((X(:,i) - estimated_mean(i))); end covar = (tmp.'*tmp)/m;


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The Statistics toolbox includes many probability distributions for you to choose from, both parametric and non-parametric distributions. For each it provides functions for PDF, CDF, fitting, random number generation, etc.. I suggest you start with the "Distribution Fitting app": dfittool. EDIT: In addition, MuPAD has support for a number of ...


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Adding to the OP's solution (e.g.: that the best option was fortran code, and nothing else identified came close), one way to get to a pure java library is with the the f2j compiler (fortran to java) http://icl.cs.utk.edu/f2j I've found the code it generates it be quite workable (e.g. such as this minpack library: ...



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