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4

Several problems: If you use _all and have string type variables, then the loop will fail. You cannot take the log of a string variable. That will result in type mismatch error, so use ds to recover the list of variables that are numeric. You have gen 'v' and it should be gen `v'. Notice the subtle difference in the type of quote used. You cannot generate ...


3

You can do this in one line using the apply function: # Sample data frame set.seed(144) DT <- matrix(rnorm(1000), nrow=100) k <- 10 # Compute average of 10 largest values in each column apply(DT, 2, function(x) mean(tail(sort(x), k))) # [1] 1.721765 1.658917 1.630231 1.558280 1.606363 1.526322 1.810814 1.678135 # [9] 1.541305 1.621984


3

Here is a vectorized, zero- and NA-tolerant function for calculating geometric mean in R. The verbose mean calculation involving length(x) is necessary for the cases where x contains non-positive values. gm_mean = function(x, na.rm=TRUE){ exp(sum(log(x[x > 0 & !is.na(x)]), na.rm=na.rm) / length(x)) } Thanks to @ben-bolker for noting the na.rm ...


2

Is this what you're looking for? quantile(dataset, 0.4)


2

Matlab (completely ignoring c/c++ tags) Firstly the function is Piecewise so while it can be defined in a single line its much clearer to break it then recombine... what you want it to do... x=mod(x,1); if x <= 0.3 value = -1 / 0.3 * x + 1; else %// x > 0.3 value = 1 / 0.7 * (x - 0.3); end how to do it in one line... to replicate the if ...


2

Use predictor.best_estimator_ as the estimator in cross_val_score. This is the one with the best parameters. The way you choose it, you are probably obtaining the initial estimator with default parameters. You could check by putting the latter in cross_val_score as well and comparing results.


1

Just include the block in the at argument: contour(CR.rs2, ~ x1 + x2, image = TRUE, at = c(summary(CR.rs2)$canonical$xs, Block="B1")) contour(CR.rs2, ~ x1 + x2, image = TRUE, at = c(summary(CR.rs2)$canonical$xs, Block="B2")) ... and same with persp


1

Use n=100; Y=runif(100); T=0; Ydiff=outer(Y,Y,"-")^2; Y_1=exp(-0.5*Ydiff); Y_2=sqrt(2)*exp(-0.25*Y^2); T=sum(rowMeans(Y_1)-Y_2) + (n*(3^(-(1/2)))) Comparison of methods given so far give: T=0; n=100; set.seed(100) Y=runif(100); for(j in 1:n){ for(k in 1:n){ T = T + ((1/n)*(exp(-(1/2)*((Y[j]-Y[k])^2)))); } T = T - ...


1

It's more useful to create the indexes in advance and then just sum over an array rather than computing new indices over two nested loops indexes = expand.grid(1:n,1:n) T = 1/n*sum(exp(-1/2*(Y[indexes[,1]]-Y[indexes[,2]]))) T = T-(sqrt(2))*sum(exp(-1/4*(Y[1:n]))) T = T+n/sqrt(3) Edit: For large n, this is impractical, as an n of 1,000,000 would make a ...


1

I had the same feeling, of wasting time, building a nice GUI to deliver results from simple code some time back. But just as programmers make libs and share/sell them to each other to enhance productivity, so do designers. Search for Admin Panel and / or take a look at the selection from my favorite design site: ...


1

You could try a search for 'HTML template GUI charts' on google. Incorporate that template to your code and you're done... I've found the following result, which looks promising, but I haven't checked out the code yet: http://www.egrappler.com/free-premium-html-adminbackend-template-for-web-applications-bluewhale-admin/


1

Your author seems to want to solve for the left eigenvectors. Since P is not symmetric, the matrix of left eigenvectors is not just the transpose of the matrix of right eigenvectors. The left eigenvectors are found as the eigenvectors of the transpose of P. See Wolfram http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Eigenvector.html . You can reproduce your author's ...


1

You might be able to use filter and select (ggvis/dplyr packages) to limit the choices to the factors from the column of interest. As I am newly exploring these methods, I would probably start with breaking down the data frame first (that's more clear to me right now). But I'm positive this can be done within the ggivs function. areas_data <- ...


1

Maybe it's Not the right answer. I just want to say, if you replace the 'mean=0' with 'mean=[0.]' in you lines, Julia get the following Answer. :) julia> cov(A,mean=[0.]) 3x3 Array{Float64,2}: 1.25 -1.25 -0.25 -1.25 1.25 0.25 -0.25 0.25 1.25



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