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5

This may seem a little magical, but actually uses some common idioms: since pandas doesn't yet have nice native support for a contiguous groupby, you often (for a "me"-ish value of "you") find yourself needing something like this. >>> y * (y.groupby((y != y.shift()).cumsum()).cumcount() + 1) 0 0 1 0 2 1 3 2 4 3 5 0 6 0 7 ...


4

An alternate way (not necessarily better) is: xx = x.reshape(2,-1).T # faster, minor issue though yy = y.reshape(2,-1).T results = [pearsonr(a,b)[0] for a,b in zip(xx,yy)] results = np.array(results).reshape(x.shape[1:]) Another current thread was discussing the use of list comprehensions to iterate over values of an array(s): Confusion about ...


3

why the obsession with the ultra-pythonic way of doing things? readability + efficiency trumps "leet hackerz style." I'd just do it like so: a = [0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,1] b = [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0] for i in range(len(a)): if a[i] == 1: b[i] = b[i-1] + 1 else: b[i] = 0


2

I think the metric you're using is from this paper (though the form they give is not quite the same as yours): Islam, A. and Inkpen, D. 2006. "Second Order Co-occurrence PMI for Determining the Semantic Similarity of Words". In Proceedings of the International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2006), Genoa, Italy, pp. ...


2

n and p describe the distribution itself. size gives the number (and shape) of results. Best illustrated with this example from the manual: >>> n, p = 10, .5 # number of trials, probability of each trial >>> s = np.random.binomial(n, p, 1000) # result of flipping a coin 10 times, tested 1000 times. You will get a 1000-number vector, each ...


1

The diagonals of the covariance matrix are the variances, but the arguments sigmax and sigmay of mlab.bivariate_normal are the square roots of the variances. Change this: Z = mlab.bivariate_normal(X, Y, cov_test[0,0], cov_test[1,1], 0, 0, cov_test[0,1]) to this: Z = mlab.bivariate_normal(X, Y, ...


1

If something is clear, it is "pythonic". Frankly, I cannot even make your original solution work. Also, if it does work, I am curious if it is faster than a loop. Did you compare? Now, since we've started discussing efficiency, here are some insights. Loops in Python are inherently slow, no matter what you do. Of course, if you are using pandas, you are ...


1

Compliments to @behzad.nouri who penned this answer originally. I chose to post the entire answer rather than a link to it because links can sometimes change or be deleted. Perhaps you could detect high-multi-collinearity by inspecting the eigen values of correlation matrix. A very low eigen value shows that the data are collinear, and the corresponding ...


1

Below 2 way we can get counter : 1) http://graph.facebook.com/?id=http://www.google.com 2) https://api.facebook.com/method/links.getStats?urls=http://www.google.com&format=json First (1), will give total counter Second (2), will return share_count, like_count, comment_count, total_count, click_count, comments_fbid, commentsbox_count


1

Is this any faster? It only goes through y one time... y=[0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,1] def f(y): z = [] i = 0 for e in y: if e == 0: i = 0 z.append(e) else: z.append(e + i) i += 1 return z f(y)


1

Keeping things simple, using one array, one loop, and one conditional. a = [0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,1] for i in range(1, len(a)): if a[i] == 1: a[i] += a[i - 1]


1

OK let's try this: The F-statistic for the fit compares the fit to a fit with no predictors, e.g. the fit to Y~1. So anova(lm(Y~1,df),lm(Y~X1+X2,df)) # Analysis of Variance Table # # Model 1: Y ~ 1 # Model 2: Y ~ X1 + X2 # Res.Df RSS Df Sum of Sq F Pr(>F) # 1 9 492557 # 2 7 338941 2 153617 1.5863 0.2703 ...


1

To get the exports by country and year, aggregate is handy: aggregate(value ~ format(date, "%Y") + country, data=trade, FUN=sum) ## format(date, "%Y") country value ## 1 2013 Belgium 89943 ## 2 2006 France 1208 ## 3 2009 France 402 ## 4 2008 Spain 23820 You can then take this and produce the ...


1

One approach to take an asymmetrical property and make it symmetrical is to use the average (or other measure) of them: d'(x,y) = d'(y,x) = (d(x,y) + d(y,x))/2 One familiar usage of such technique is making the KL-Divergence symmetrical by applying the same technique. This is known as the Jensen-Shannon Diversion


1

An alternative is to use cSplit_e from my "splitstackshape" package. x = c("1","1","1/2","2","2/3","1/3") library(splitstackshape) cSplit_e(data.frame(x), "x", "/") # x x_1 x_2 x_3 # 1 1 1 NA NA # 2 1 1 NA NA # 3 1/2 1 1 NA # 4 2 NA 1 NA # 5 2/3 NA 1 1 # 6 1/3 1 NA 1 (Note that the results here are transposed in ...



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