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5

There are lots of things wrong here. for(i in 1:simsize=simsize) should be throwing an error: > for(i in 1:simsize=simsize) { print(i)} Error: unexpected '=' in "for(i in 1:simsize=" Better is for(i in seq_len(simsize)) Then x <- function(ran.func) is not doing what you thought it was; it is returning a function with xbars[i]<-mean(x) as ...


3

http://jsfiddle.net/naeemshaikh27/92wj8cv9/ see the console, I have the same code as yours, but you have just made a syntaxt error, document.write(array1[i] . "<br />"); Try changing it to document.write(array1[i] + "<br />");


3

I believe this is what you want (data in A): > A ID Desc Val CODEX IsCustomer 1: 1 hallpo 0 Random TRUE 2: 98 TEST 0 Random FALSE 3: 765 asdfsd 0 Random TRUE 4: 13 alla 100 Random TRUE 5: 3 asdfs 123 Random FALSE 6: 24 sd 2 Random FALSE Try (thank you akrun and David) B <- A[Val != 0] ...


3

If you inspect the body of the function ks.test you will see the following line somewhere in the body: if (length(unique(x)) < n) { warning("ties should not be present for the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test") TIES <- TRUE } This tells you that when the number of unique elements in x is below the number of elements - you will get this warning. In ...


2

You can extract just the ISIN with str_extract and a good ISIN regex: library(stringr) VAL <- c("TES+XS0255015603+ae2s", "TEST*XS0255015603+d2aasd", "safd*adf*XS0255015603++", "gasdfs*dsa*US0917971006", "asdfsUS0917971006adf", "steve", "sd-asd-afds-US0917971006") isin_pat <- ...


2

Basically, if you proceed with replacement in gsub, you need to put parenthesis on the group you want to isolate: > df ID VAL 1: 1 TES+XS0255015603+ae2s 2: 2 TEST*XS0255015603+d2aasd 3: 4 safd*adf*XS0255015603++ 4: 2 gasdfs*dsa*US0917971006 5: 3 asdfsUS0917971006adf 6: 24 sd-asd-afds-US0917971006 > ...


2

There are a few problems here: 1) Even though the question used dput the object has a pointer in it so it won't be usable on other systems. I have edited out the pointer to give: df <- structure(list(ID = c(1L, 2L, 4L, 2L, 3L, 24L), VAL = c("TES+XS0255015603+ae2s", "TEST*XS0255015603+d2aasd", "safd*adf*XS0255015603++", "gasdfs*dsa*US0917971006", ...


2

To extract just the values, use the -o and -P grep options: grep -rioPh --include="*_out.txt" "(?<=${varName}=)[\d.]+" . That looks for a pattern like nHops=1.234 and just prints out 1.234 Given your sample data: $ var="var1" $ grep -oPh "(?<=$var=)[\d.]+" exp_1_try_{1,2,3}.txt 30.523 78.98 78.100 To output some stats, you should be able to ...


1

After your write.csv() call, you can append to the csv with the following call to cat(). cat("\n", "Freq", summary[,1], sep = "\n", append = TRUE, file = "result.csv") In the above call, here's what's happening: first add an extra blank line with "\n". then add the "Freq" line you requested above the summary next is summary[,1] for the n part of the ...


1

Dealing with NA first and then add your column: > df[is.na(df)]="" > df$New = with(df, A==B) > df A B New 1 1 1 TRUE 2 test No Match FALSE 3 2 No Match FALSE 4 3 3 TRUE 5 TRUE 6 Test Test TRUE 7 No Match FALSE Or remove NA from your initial data.frame with df = ...


1

I utilized the below function to obtain the answer: > A <- with(df, max(abs(Data-Expected))) > A 0.082 Basically, this function calculates the differences between the two columns into a new vector, whose values are transformed into absolute values, and from the absolute values the largest one is obtained. Credit to Josh O'Brien.


1

An rpy2 implementation: import rpy2.robjects as robjects def Ftest_pvalue_rpy2(d1,d2): """docstring for Ftest_pvalue_rpy2""" rd1 = (robjects.FloatVector(d1)) rd2 = (robjects.FloatVector(d2)) rvtest = robjects.r['var.test'] return rvtest(rd1,rd2)[2][0] With this result: In [4]: x1 = [0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 68.7169110318] In ...


1

Here is a solution based on @Khashaa's suggestion: power.z = function(mu,n) { power = 1 - pnorm( 1.645 - (mu - 75)/(2.5/sqrt(n)) , 0, 1) return(power) } power.bin = function(mu,n) { p = 1 - pnorm(75, mu, 2.5) power = 1 - pnorm( 1.645*sqrt(.25/(p*(1-p))) - (p-.5)/sqrt(p*(1-p)/n), 0, 1) return(power) } fnDiffZBin = function(mu, n) abs(power.z(mu, ...


1

Similar to an answer several months ago, the Statistics Toolbox doesn't support the Symbolic Toolbox currently. Therefore, you can proceed by hard coding the PDF itself and integrating it: d = exp(-(log(x)-mu)^2/(2*sigma^2))/(x*sigma*sqrt(2*pi)); int(d, x, 0, 10); Or you can use the logncdf function, which may be cleaner.


1

Sorry, I noticed you said you looked at the documentation in your question. My fault for not seeing that. As I understand it, with X and Y being your original data matrices, A and B are the sets of coefficients that perform a change of basis to maximally correlate your original data. Your data is represented in the new bases as the matrices U and V. So to ...


1

Assuming that you have timestamps for the reported numbers, you can construct the likelihood function for a parametric distribution, find the maximum-likelihood parameter estimates, and then compute an appropriate quantile (0.95, 0.99, 0.999, whatever) and report that as the daily how-bad-is-it number. I say parametric distribution because I don't know how ...


1

Obviously there are Java and Python packages that extract PMML files and return the evaluation. In Java, see JPmml: https://github.com/jpmml In Python, see Augustus: https://code.google.com/p/augustus/


1

Here is a different approach, which is nonparametric. You can bound the empirical cumulative distribution function above and below: between x_i and x_{i + 1}, (1) it is bounded below by the fraction of values which are certainly less than or equal to x_i, and (2) it is bounded above by the fraction of values which are certainly greater than x_i. These ...


1

There are several problems with your code (e.g., x in your function is never defined and is not retained between calls to addValue), so I'm guessing that this is a chopped-down version of the real code and you still have remnants remaining. Instead of picking it apart verbosely, I'll just offer my own suggested code and a few pointers. The function addValue ...


1

Your question if I get it right is not about programming or about math. It is about business analysis :-) You wrote : is clearly selling well. What is your criteria to decide what is WELL? In different situation and business flows there are many parameters. For example if your product 1 price is 1 000 000. - you did huge sales. and at the same time ...


1

Problem #1: c(x) and d(x) are lists of random numbers with a given distribution of probabilities. When you plot a histogram of c(x) or d(x), you are plotting the frequency of occurrence of each number. This frequency is just equal to the distribution. e(x) is a totally different object. You have coded it as the probability distribution itself, not a set of ...


1

This could occur when you have plyr loaded along with dplyr. You can either do this on a new R session or use dplyr::summarise(sys, numeric = sum(NUMERIC) )



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