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4

Here is a vectorized, zero- and NA-tolerant function for calculating geometric mean in R. The verbose mean calculation involving length(x) is necessary for the cases where x contains non-positive values. gm_mean = function(x, na.rm=TRUE){ exp(sum(log(x[x > 0]), na.rm=na.rm) / length(x)) } Thanks to @ben-bolker for noting the na.rm pass-through and ...


3

You can do this in one line using the apply function: # Sample data frame set.seed(144) DT <- matrix(rnorm(1000), nrow=100) k <- 10 # Compute average of 10 largest values in each column apply(DT, 2, function(x) mean(tail(sort(x), k))) # [1] 1.721765 1.658917 1.630231 1.558280 1.606363 1.526322 1.810814 1.678135 # [9] 1.541305 1.621984


2

Use predictor.best_estimator_ as the estimator in cross_val_score. This is the one with the best parameters. The way you choose it, you are probably obtaining the initial estimator with default parameters. You could check by putting the latter in cross_val_score as well and comparing results.


2

You should really look at some basic information on statistics! And decide which information is important to you. Can I sum them then scale the summation to the range [0,1]? is in fact the definition of the average value. You should consider the actual meaning of the data, and then check if average, or RMS (Root Mean Square), Standard deviation or ...


1

You haven't provided nor a reproducible example, nor the desired output, so I'll have to guess If this is your column names vector vec <- LETTERS[1:3] And this is your data set set.seed(1) df <- data.frame(A = sample(10, 10), B = sample(20, 10), C = sample(30, 10)) Then you can try something like lapply(vec, ...


1

You can compute the log-likelihood of data by calling the logpdf method of stats.gamma and then summing the array. The first bit of code is from your example: In [63]: import scipy.stats as ss In [64]: np.random.seed(123) In [65]: alpha = 5 In [66]: loc = 100.5 In [67]: beta = 22 In [68]: data = ss.gamma.rvs(alpha, loc=loc, scale=beta, size=10000) In ...


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I'm still not sure what you need, but maybe something like this? library(data.table) setDT(serverData)[, list(`datatotal(GBs)` = `datatotal(GBs)`[1], `dataused(GBs)`= paste(`dataused(GBs)`, collapse = ", ")), by = list(server)] ## server datatotal(GBs) dataused(GBs) ## 1: server1 800 500, 510 ...


1

discretize() is a function from the package infotheo that you can find in CRAN. There are some references to that package in the minet documentation. Maybe the authors of minet have moved some functionality to the infotheo package but since it is not a dependency it does not get installed automatically. It may be worth contacting the authors about this. ...


1

I think what you're looking for is called the Bayesian Information Criterion or BIC. Check it out on Wikipedia... Then pick several distributions, calculate the BIC for each distribution with your data, and finally see which one has the best BIC. Although I make this out to be a simple problem, it actually isn't. For many distributions calculating the ...


1

SELECT registerDate, count(registerDate) FROM [TABLE] WHERE registerDate between (GETDATE()-7) and GETDATE() group by registerDate order by registerDate desc This will take a table like: 2 |1905-06-26 00:00:00.000 4 |2014-08-03 00:00:00.000 5 |2014-08-02 00:00:00.000 1 |2014-08-01 00:00:00.000 3 |2014-07-01 00:00:00.000 6 |2010-07-01 ...


1

Just include the block in the at argument: contour(CR.rs2, ~ x1 + x2, image = TRUE, at = c(summary(CR.rs2)$canonical$xs, Block="B1")) contour(CR.rs2, ~ x1 + x2, image = TRUE, at = c(summary(CR.rs2)$canonical$xs, Block="B2")) ... and same with persp


1

Use n=100; Y=runif(100); T=0; Ydiff=outer(Y,Y,"-")^2; Y_1=exp(-0.5*Ydiff); Y_2=sqrt(2)*exp(-0.25*Y^2); T=sum(rowMeans(Y_1)-Y_2) + (n*(3^(-(1/2)))) Comparison of methods given so far give: T=0; n=100; set.seed(100) Y=runif(100); for(j in 1:n){ for(k in 1:n){ T = T + ((1/n)*(exp(-(1/2)*((Y[j]-Y[k])^2)))); } T = T - ...


1

It's more useful to create the indexes in advance and then just sum over an array rather than computing new indices over two nested loops indexes = expand.grid(1:n,1:n) T = 1/n*sum(exp(-1/2*(Y[indexes[,1]]-Y[indexes[,2]]))) T = T-(sqrt(2))*sum(exp(-1/4*(Y[1:n]))) T = T+n/sqrt(3) Edit: For large n, this is impractical, as an n of 1,000,000 would make a ...



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