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3

mlply(expand.grid(n=4:5, df1=1:2, df2=1:3), rf, ncp=0) gives you a list. which you could combine with rbind.fill as in Gavin's answer.


3

Do you mean ## include Normal (df -> Inf) values at head of the table, as in ## linked example DegreeFreedom <- c(Inf,DegreeFreedom) m <- t(outer(Prob,DegreeFreedom, qt,lower.tail=FALSE)) dimnames(m) <- list(df=DegreeFreedom,alpha=Prob) Check: m["1","0.1"] ## 3.077684 ?


3

You could use apply with replace=TRUE for the sample t(apply(df1[,-1], 1, sample, replace=TRUE))


2

Instead System.out.print(numberValues+" ");//displays address write System.out.print(numberValues[i]+" ");//displays value here


2

I don't see the dedicated method to solve your problem, but it can be solved in two steps using Arrays.binarySearch: int pos = Arrays.binarySearch(stats.getSortedValues(), myScore); double percentile = (pos < 0 ? -1 - pos : pos) * 100.0 / stats.getN(); It should be more efficient than your current solution.


2

Here's one way: pars <- expand.grid(n = 4, df1 = 1:2, df2 = 1:3, ncp = 0) set.seed(12345) do.call("mapply", c(FUN = rf, as.list(pars), SIMPLIFY = TRUE)) Which gives > do.call("mapply", c(FUN = rf, as.list(pars), SIMPLIFY = TRUE)) [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [1,] 1.347567e-01 0.2530428 1.51868436 ...


2

You could sample the column indices all at once and then use matrix subsetting to avoid having to use apply: ## Determine how many indices are required (nrow x (ncol - 1)) nsamp <- prod(dim(df1[, -1])) ## Sample from the number of desired columns, here 5 = ncol(df1[, -1]) mySamp <- sample.int(5, nsamp, replace = TRUE) ## Create a matrix of row and ...


1

Data: df = data.frame(q1=c(F,T,T),q2=c(T,F,F),q3=rep(T,3), p1=c(1,2,1), p2=c(3,4,5), p3=c(4,4,2)) You can try: library(qdapTools) t(mtabulate(df[grep('q',names(df), value=T)])) # q1 q2 q3 #FALSE 1 2 0 #TRUE 2 1 3 t(mtabulate(df[grep('p',names(df), value=T)])) # p1 p2 p3 #1 2 0 0 #2 1 0 1 #3 0 1 0 #4 0 1 2 #5 0 1 0


1

RAE and RSE closer to 0 is a good sign...you want error to be as low as possible. See this article for more information on evaluating your model. From that page: The term "error" here represents the difference between the predicted value and the true value. The absolute value or the square of this difference are usually computed to capture the total ...


1

You can't. The between-class scatter matrix is of rank at most n_classes - 1, thus there are at most n_classes - 1 directions that maximize the ratio of the between-class variance and the within- class variance. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_discriminant_analysis#Multiclass_LDA for more details.


1

How about this df['pos'] = df.A/df.A.mean() + df.B/df.B.mean() df.sort( columns='pos', ascending=False) # A B pos #3 4 4 3.909091 #7 10 0 2.500000 #1 1 3 2.431818 #2 2 2 1.954545 #6 4 1 1.727273 #0 3 1 1.477273 #4 5 0 1.250000 #5 3 0 0.750000 If you have more columns you want to rank ['A','B','C', ...] cols = ...


1

You need to make sure you specify the same range when binning the data. In that way, the corresponding indices of the bins will be consistent. I've used the lower level numpy function hist2d, extension to standard deviations can be done in the same way using scipy.stats.binned_statistic_2d, import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt #Setup random ...


1

I guess you want to sample only with the non-NA values. In that case, !is.na can be useful to remove the NA values and then we sample on the remaining values. The output will be a list ('lst') as the number of elements differ (4 and 5) for each row after the sample. lst <- apply(df, 1, function(x) sample(x[!is.na(x)], replace=TRUE)) If we need to ...


1

First, if i understand your question correctly, for each hour on a date, you get a random 2 digit number. You have a set of dates with corresponding random 2-digit numbers and now for a new date where you dont have the random 2-digit numbers from, you want a linear regression to predict what that 2-digit number is. However, i do not know if that is the best ...


1

Your problem is caused because you're trying to sort by a string column as if it was a numeric column. If all the elements begin with S, you can just make them numeric: > x <- paste0("S", 1:20) > x [1] "S1" "S2" "S3" "S4" "S5" "S6" "S7" "S8" "S9" "S10" "S11" "S12" "S13" "S14" "S15" "S16" "S17" "S18" [19] "S19" "S20" > sort(x) [1] "S1" ...


1

You need to add line of code to do the sampling, ie. Boot.fun <- function(data) { data <- sample(data, replace=T) m1 <- ... since you didn't supply a function to the argument rand.gen to generate random values. This is discussed in the documentation for ?boot. If sim = "parametric" and you don't supply a generating ...


1

First, be sure you are importing chisquare from scipy.stats. Numpy has the function numpy.random.chisquare, but that does not do a statistical test. It generates samples from a chi-square probability distribution. So be sure you use: from scipy.stats import chisquare There is a second problem. As slices of the two-dimensional array returned by loadtxt, ...


1

One option is to loop over the data set calculating the t test for each row, but it is not as elegant. set.seed(2112) DataSample <- matrix(rnorm(24000),nrow=1000) colnames(DataSample) <- c(paste("Trial",1:12,sep=""),paste("Control",13:24,sep="")) # initialize vector of stored p-values pvalue <- rep(0,nrow(DataSample)) for (i in ...


1

Just wanted to add some simplifications and benchmarking. Since you have a fair amount of data, speed may be a concern. The apply() approaches can be simplified for some speed-up. Since your data seems to be all numeric, working with a matrix will be much faster than a data.frame. df = data.frame(x1=rnorm(100),x2=rnorm(100),x3=rnorm(100)) mat = ...


1

We can use substr to get the 'year' part from 'Date' column, use that in subset to extract the rows that have '2010' as year, select the 'Var1' column, and get the sum sum(subset(df1, substr(Date,5,8)==2010, select=Var1)) Or a dplyr/lubridate option would be using filter and summarise to get similar result. library(lubridate) library(dplyr) df1 ...


1

Building on the previous answer, instead using length to count the number of obs greater than 2.05 in each column and then barplot to display the number by column. df<- data.frame(matrix(rnorm(10000)+1,ncol=100,nrow=100)) nc1<-apply(df,2,function(x) length(which(x>2.05))) a = table(nc1) ...


1

Here is an example of what you could do: df<-data.frame(x1=rnorm(100),x2=rnorm(100),x3=rnorm(100)) nc1<-apply(df,2,function(x)sum(x>1)) hist(nc1)



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