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3

You’d be looking at java.lang.math, and from the docs: The class Math contains methods for performing basic numeric operations such as the elementary exponential, logarithm, square root, and trigonometric functions. So in short no. For distributions other than Gaussian you’re going to have to look elsewhere. In terms of third party libraries, ...


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You can try df$newCol <- apply(df[seq(5, ncol(df), by=2)], 1, sd) Or use rowSds from matrixStats library(matrixStats) df$newCol <- rowSds(as.matrix(df[seq(5, ncol(df), by=2)])) Or as commented by @DavidArenburg, you can check the vectorized RowSD data set.seed(253) df <- cbind(as.data.frame(matrix(sample(letters, 120*4, replace=TRUE), ...


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41 currently installed, 53 total installs (including those no longer installed).


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myvector + 2*sample(c(TRUE,FALSE), length(myvector), prob=c(0.2,0.8), repl=TRUE) That will give a variable number of 2's to be added (which is what you were asking) but sometimes people want to know that exactly 20% will have a 2 added in whoch case it would be: myvector + 2*sample(c(TRUE,rep(FALSE,4)))


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Don't convert your categorical variable into numeric variables - this will create a very different model [your attempts would not have worked anyway] There is no such thing as a "regression" estimate for the entire variable. If a categorical variable has n categories, the standard approach will create n-1 indicator variables, each of which will have a ...


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Start with identifying the core needs that you think monitoring will solve. Try to answer the two questions "What do I want to know?" and "How do I want to act on that information?". Examples of "What do I want to know?" Performance over time Largest API users Most commonly used API features Error occurrence in the API Examples of "How do I want to act ...


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You can do this easily with pandas. import pandas as pd data = np.random.random(20) stds = pd.rolling_std(data, window=7, center=True, min_periods=1) # min_periods to get the edges


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Well, you should first look a bit into regression analysis like has been commented. You have some issues in understanding there. But, this is what you want: obsGroupA <- round(runif(40, 240, 63535)) obsGroupB <- round(runif(40, 2478, 95063)) obsGroupC <- round(runif(40, 3102, 104799)) propGroupA <- obsGroupA/(obsGroupA + obsGroupB + obsGroupC) ...


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You could create a very memory efficient view on the array using stride_tricks, but that will still not solve your problem of the window at the edges, where the window is "cut-off" or reduced. There, you could consider iterating over the different window sizes. It'll give you a speed boost if the windowsize is much smaller than the array over which you want ...


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You need to use the na.action argument with na.omit of the train function. As the documentation says for na.action (type ?train): A function to specify the action to be taken if NAs are found. The default action is for the procedure to fail. An alternative is na.omit, which leads to rejection of cases with missing values on any required variable. (NOTE: ...


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You can increase all number with minimum and convert it to percent. -17+abs(-50) = 33 -50+abs(-50) = 0 100+abs(-50) = 150 120+abs(-50) = 170 5+abs(-50) = 55 20+abs(-50) = 70 After all result should convert like an this: (number / max) * 100 (55 / 170) * 100 = 32.35% (70 / 170) * 100 = 41.17% (170 / 170) * 100 = 100%


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just use fGarch package and these functions: dsnorm(x, mean = 0, sd = 1, xi = 1.5, log = FALSE) psnorm(q, mean = 0, sd = 1, xi = 1.5) qsnorm(p, mean = 0, sd = 1, xi = 1.5) rsnorm(n, mean = 0, sd = 1, xi = 1.5) ** mean, sd, xi location parameter mean, scale parameter sd, skewness parameter xi. Examples ## snorm - # Ranbdom Numbers: par(mfrow = c(2, ...


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the following reproducible example shows jlhoward's comment is right, and Darko's reply is wrong: library(gstat) var1 = 1:3; var2 = 1:3; x = 1:3; y = 1:3 data<-list(var1,var2,x,y) coordinates(data) = ~x+y Error in (function (classes, fdef, mtable) : unable to find an inherited method for function ‘coordinates<-’ for signature ‘"list"’ ...


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It's because you are taking the first four digits that you get a skewed result. For 50% of the numbers you will get a result that is 65 digits long instead of 64, and the first digit is 1. For example adding the two numbers in your example: 3CDC3C8C9... CF27CC73E... = 10C0409007... Taking the first four digits from the result gives you 10C0. As you ...


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You need to run it like this using cbind: Data df <- read.table(header=T, text='Group Level1 Level2 a 1 0 a 2 3 a 4 3 b 2 4 b 1 3 b 3 2 c 2 4 c 3 2 c 1 3') Solution: > manova( cbind(Level1,Level2) ~ Group, data=df) Call: manova(cbind(Level1, Level2) ~ Group, data = ...


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Here's one way. You can split your data, perform the regressions and use predict() to find the confidence intervals, then you can unsplit to return to the original structure. For example with your test data and splitting on the "genger" (sic) column in the sample data unsplit(lapply(split(data, data$genger), function(x) { m<-lm(weight~height, x) ...


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Rejection sampling is worth a try. Compute the maximum weight of a sample (max of the abs of each of the k least and k greatest). Repeatedly generate a uniform random sample and accept it with probability equal to its weight over the maximum weight until a sample is accepted.



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