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6

Disclaimer: You have not specified data characteristics, so my answer will assume that it is not too large(more than 1,000,000 sentences, each at most 1,000). Also Description is a bit complicated and I might have not understood the problem fully. Solution: Instead of focusing on different combinations, why don't you create a hashMap(dict in python) for ...


5

Looks to me that you need: predict(fit, new.df, se.fit = TRUE, interval="prediction") "Standard errors" apply to the confidence limits around the estimate of the mean, while prediction errors might easily be described as "standard deviations" around predictions. > dfrm <- data.frame(a=rnorm(30), drop=FALSE) > dfrm$y <- ...


4

May I suggest you try the approach below. I have no mathematical proof that it produces the absolutely best "score", or indeed some other "measure of goodness", but I do believe it may help you out, unless, of course, the case requires that you actually prove and find the absolutely best. I don't speak python, but the strategy and ensuing implementation ...


4

You need one of replace=TRUE or size options since there are a bunch of 0 probabilities. Otherwise, sample is trying to return the same number of elements as the length of the input, but can't do so because of a lack of positive probabilities.


4

No, the resulting distribution is not going to be perfectly uniform, for most values of n. For small values, it'll be so close to uniform that you'd have a hard time detecting any difference from a uniform distribution, but as n gets larger the bias can become noticeable. To illustrate, here's some Python code (not JavaScript, sorry, but the principle is ...


3

You can do this efficiently with the dplyr package, after first gathering all probabilities into a single column (very similar to what you were doing with melt): library(dplyr) library(tidyr) pairs <- A4 %>% gather(individual, value, -SNP) %>% separate(individual, c("group", "founder"), sep = "_haplotype") %>% group_by(SNP, group) %>% ...


2

The trick you describe is actually called Laplace smoothing (or additive, or add-by-one smoothing) and suppose to add the same summand to the other part of the fraction - nominator in your case or denominator in original case. In other words, you should add 1 to the total number of docs: log (# of docs + 1 / # of docs with term + 1) Btw, it is often ...


2

How much of a problem it is depends on the nature of your data. The bigger issue will be that you simply have a huge class imbalance (50 As for every B). If you end up getting good classification accuracy anyway, then fine - nothing to do. What to do next depends on your data and the nature of the problem and what is acceptable in a solution. There really ...


2

If Math.random (or equivalent) generated a uniformly-distributed bit pattern out of those bit patterns corresponding to floating point numbers in the range [0, 1), then it would produce an extremely biased sample. There are as many representable floating point number in [0.25, 0.5) as there are in [0.5, 1.0), which is also the same number of representable ...


1

I would look for a form of data clustering, to speed up the search across each 20 word trial. The data which matters is the unique words in a sentence. 2 sentences can be considered close if the jaccard distance is small. The jaccard distance is 1 - (size of(intersection of words in sentences))/( size of( union of words in sentences)). Because the ...


1

Following @BondedDust's example: he shows how to get prediction intervals (+/- 1.96*std_dev). In principle you could recover the set.seed(1001) dfrm <- data.frame(a=rnorm(30), drop=FALSE) dfrm$y <- 4+dfrm$a*5+0.5*rnorm(30) Fit model: mod <- lm(y ~ a, data=dfrm) Predict: pframe <- data.frame(a=seq(-2,2,by=0.1)) pred <- ...


1

The value that you want can be computed with the isf (inverse survival function) method of the scipy.stats.chi2 distribution. This method uses broadcasting, so you can create your table with just a couple lines of code: In [61]: from scipy.stats import chi2 In [62]: p = np.array([0.995, 0.99, 0.975, 0.95, 0.90, 0.10, 0.05, 0.025, 0.01, 0.005]) Make df ...


1

What histfit does is plotting a pdf normalized to the scale of the histogram. A scaling factor of numel(p).*mean(diff(x)) is applied to match the curve with the histogram. It scales the area under the pdf to the area the histogram covers.


1

I assume you have somewhere an answer that seems to come with a squared factor -which I'll take as n^2, where n is the number of strings (not the number of distinct comparisons, which is n*(n-1)/2, as +flaschenpost points to ). It would be easier to give you a more precise answer if you'd exactly quote what that answer is. From what I understand of your ...


1

You can count how many players with larger score there are: SELECT COUNT(*) FROM MyTable WHERE score >= (SELECT score FROM MyTable WHERE playerName = 'X'); (If you want to know this for all players, a single query would be more efficient.)


1

... years later.... For completeness (because this isn't mentioned in the answers) and personal reasons (I always have pandas imported in my modules but not necessarily sklearn), this is also quite straightforward with pandas.get_dummies() import numpy as np import pandas In [1]: a = np.array(['a', 'b', 'c', 'a', 'b', 'c']) In [2]: b = ...



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