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3

Your strikes is a random variable with the binomial distribution. scipy has support for sampling from this distribution more efficiently than summing a huge number of Bernouilli trials. Here's an example: from scipy.stats import binom luck = 0.3 trials = 200000000 print binom(trials, luck).rvs() Despite the large number of trials, this runs almost ...


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There are several tools for this in functional programming, like folds and list/generator comprehensions, but the most basic idea is recursion. So, for instance, for getTotal(): getTotal(sides, dice): if dice == 0: return 0 else return rand.int(sides) + getTotal(sides, dice - 1) This function, sadly, will not work for your ...


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# your data set.seed(96) sampleData <- data.frame( ID = 1:200, outcome = sample(1:7, 200, replace = T), scale = sample(1:7, 200, replace = T), dummy1 = sample(0:1, 200, replace = T), dummy2 = sample(0:1, 200, replace = T)) # all possible combinations newData <- data.frame(scale=rep(1:7, each=4), dummy1=rep(c(0, 0, 1, 1), 7), ...


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I would suggest to consider using ansible for this purpose. Here's a simple playbook that collects some data on hosts specified in inventory file and appends it to a local file: - hosts: all remote_user: your_user tasks: - name: collect load average shell: cat /proc/loadavg register: cluster_node_la - name: write to local disk ...


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The output of K-Means algorithm depends a lot on the initial centroids that you choose. If you choose centroids that are close to one another then the clusters that you get will be skewed. Moreover if the true clusters have unbalanced number of data points then by choosing the initial centroids randomly there is a high probability that you would choose the ...


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I'd be tempted to use a probabilistic rank — the probability that an item category is from the group given the actual numbers for that category. This requires making some assumptions about the data set, including why a category may have any out-of-group items. You might take a look at the binomial test or the Mann-Whitney U test for a start. You might ...


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Some of the features are boolean, but other features are categorical and can take on a small number of values (~5). This is an interesting question, but it is actually more than a single one: How to deal with a categorical feature in NB. How to deal with non-homogeneous features in NB (and, as I'll point out in the following, even two categorical ...


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As your distribution is not in scipy.stats you can either add it to the package or try doing things "by hand". For the former have a look at the source code of the scipy.stats package - it might not be all that much work to add a new distribution! For the latter option you can use a maximum Likelihood approach. To do so define first a method giving you the ...


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The simplest approach I can think of would be to have a look at the correlation matrix via proc corr: data diseases; input Moya Hypothyroid Hyperthyroid Celiac; cards; 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 ...


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IIUC, you can use numpy.digitize df['C'] = df.groupby(['A'])['B'].transform(lambda x: np.digitize(x,bins=np.array([0,1,2]))) A B C 0 foo 0 1 1 foo 0 1 2 foo 1 2 3 bar 0 1 4 bar 0 1 5 bar 1 2


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Hopefully this accomplishes what you are looking for. data have ; input ColA $ ColB $ ColC ColD ColE $; cards; A 20150707 1 100 xxx B 20150708 0 100 xyz B 20150708 0 200 xyz B 20150709 1 150 xyz C 20150709 0 100 yyy C 20150710 1 200 yyy C 20150710 1 300 yyy D 20150710 2 100 zzz ; proc sql; create table want as select distinct ColA, ...


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The answer is no, I'm afraid. The ranges used in COUNTIF(S)/SUMIF(S)/AVERAGEIF(S) must be either: 1) References to worksheet ranges 2) Constructions which resolve to references to worksheet ranges One example of the former: =SUMIF(A1:A10,"A",B1:B10) And two of the latter (which just happen to be identical to the above): =SUMIF(A1:INDEX(A:A,10),"A",B1:...



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