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4

First, having multiple tables with the same formats is a sign of bad database design, in general. It is better to have one table with all the rows. Second, a hundred tables is starting to get into the limits of what MySQL queries can handle. The following will not have great performance because it requires sorting all the data, but it should work: select ...


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So std::tgamma(x) computes the gamma function of x. This function goes to infinity quite rapidly: http://www.wolframalpha.com/share/clip?f=d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427et5pmak8jtn Already at x == 31, you have a very large number. When converting this very large double back to int, the results are undefined behavior (4.9 Floating-integral conversions ...


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Since there is no mention of VIF so far, I will add my answer. Variance Inflation Factor>10 usually indicates serious redundancy between predictor variables. VIF indicates the factor by which variance of the co-efficient of a variable would increase if it was not highly correlated with other variables. vif() is available in package cars and applied to an ...


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Can not replicate the error, see: In [15]: import scipy.stats as ss class skew_norm_gen(ss.rv_continuous): def _pdf(self, x, s): return 2 * ss.norm.pdf(x) * ss.norm.cdf(x * s) skew_norm = skew_norm_gen(name='skew_norm', shapes='s') In [17]: skew_norm.pdf(3, 4) Out[17]: 0.0088636968238760151 Yes you can pass additional *args: In [18]: class ...


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This will do it for you. lapply( mtcars[,-1], function(x) summary(lm(mtcars$mpg ~ x)) ) A data.frame object is a list with some other features so this will go through each column of mtcars excluding the first one and perform the regressions. If you save the resulting list in something like L then you can access each one easily by just using the same name ...


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A very simple method would be to use a for loop and store the results in a list: lst <- list() for(i in seq_len(3)){ lst[[i]] <- df[sample(seq_len(nrow(df)), 5, replace = TRUE),] lst[[i]]["Sample"] <- i } > lst [[1]] Num Dollars Sample 20 1 16779 1 1 1 31002 1 12 1 35230 1 14 1 7618 1 14.1 ...


1

strptime returns a POSIXlt object which is actually a list like you're seeing. If you use as.POSIXct instead of strptime you'll get the result you want. Also, all the functions you're calling are vectorized so you don't need to do this append strategy, instead you should be able to: strptime(substr(files, 10 ,16), '%Y %j') Or something along those lines. ...


1

hope i'm not too naive but so if you talking about the pearson correlation this will sort your series in decreasing order of correlation with the true series df<-data.frame(a=c(10,31,53,70,90), b=c(20,40,30,40,70), c=c(1,3,5,7,8)) true=c(1,3,5,7,9) res<-data.frame('cor'=cor(df,true)) res[order(-res$cor), , drop=FALSE]


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Another way to do this is to put the interaction term in as a separate variable (which avoids hacking the code for crPlot(...)). df <- data.frame(R,P1,P2,P1.P2=P1*P2) lm.fit1 <- lm(R ~ ., df) summary(lm.fit1) crPlots(lm.fit1) Note that summary(lm.fit1) yeilds exactly the same result as summary(lm(R~P1*P2,df)).


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Seems like @Johns solution is what you are looking for, but for big data sets I would use data.table (because it won't create a copy of your data in each lapply loop) library(data.table) Fits <- as.data.table(mtcars)[, list(MyFits = lapply(.SD[, -1, with = F], function(x) summary(lm(mpg ~ x))))] Some explanations of the code as.data.table will ...


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Hi try something like that : models <- lapply(paste("mpg", names(mtcars)[-1], sep = "~"), formula) res.models <- lapply(models, FUN = function(x) {summary(lm(formula = x, data = mtcars))}) names(res.models) <- paste("mpg", names(mtcars)[-1], sep = "~") res.models[["mpg~disp"]] # Call: # lm(formula = x, data = mtcars) # Residuals: # Min ...


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I'm not aware of a way to move the panel strips (the labels) to the bottom or left. Also, it's not possible to format the individual panels separately (e.g., turn off the tick marks for just one facet). So if you really need these features, you will probably have to use something other than, or in addition to ggplot. You should really look into GGally, ...


1

Hello people. This is quite a complex problem if you want to solve this in a computationally efficient way for a rolling window. I have gone ahead and written a solution to this in C#. I want to share this as the effort required to replicate this work is quite high. First, here are the results: here we take a simple drawdown implementation and ...


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Is there an option to estimate a barebones logit as in statsmodels You can set the C (inverse regularization strength) parameter to an arbitrarily high constant, as long as it's finite: >>> sk_lgt = LogisticRegression(fit_intercept=False, C=1e9).fit(x, y) >>> print(sk_lgt.coef_) [[ 0.38440594 -1.14287175]] Turning the regularization ...


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You can filter the values #sample data x<-c(4,1,10,-128,54,14,16,-128) #filter helper function isPositive <- function(x) x>=0 #calculate value(s) mean(x) #[1] -19.625 mean(Filter(isPositive, x)) # [1] 16.5 But if you have multiple -128 it sounds like that value might actually represent missing data. It may be easier to set those as NA ...


1

Let's say your data is mtcars (built-in) and your one predictor is mpg: library(ggplot2) library(reshape2) mtmelt <- melt(mtcars, id = "mpg") ggplot(mtmelt, aes(x = value, y = mpg)) + facet_wrap(~variable, scales = "free") + geom_point() This is pretty unusual, more commonly you put predictors on the x-axis, but it's what you asked for.


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It is not at all clear what the problem is here, but if you have an array true_positive_rate and an array false_positive_rate, then plotting the ROC curve and getting the AUC is as simple as: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np x = # false_positive_rate y = # true_positive_rate # This is the ROC curve plt.plot(x,y) plt.show() # This is ...


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It gets a lot faster if you run the function in a subquery and only decompose the resulting row type on the next level: SELECT s.schemaname, s.relname, st.* FROM pg_statio_user_tables s ,pgstattuple(s.schemaname ||'.'|| s.relname) AS st; (That's an implicit LATERAL JOIN. In versions befor Postgres 9.3 use a subquery instead.) This way, the function ...


1

If space is an issue, and you'd be happy to accept an approximation, I'd start with the algorithm from the following paper: M Greenwald, S Khanna, Space-Efficient Online Computation of Quantile Summaries You can use the algorithm to compute the running estimates of the 25th and 75th percentiles of the observations seen to far. You can then feed those ...


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It's worth noting that if you're sampling with replacement, then drawing 50 (or 10,000) samples of size 5 is equivalent to drawing one sample of size 250 (or 50,000). Thus I would do it like this (you'll see I stole a line from @beginneR's answer): df = as.data.table(data) ## Select sample size sample.size = 5 n.samples = 10000 # Sample and assign groups ...



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