Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

While the following is untested, they should work. For the median: public static double median(int[] numbers) { Arrays.sort(numbers); // sort numbers int len = numbers.length; if (len % 2 == 0) // length is even return (numbers[len/2] + numbers[len/2-1]) / 2.0d; else // length is odd return (double) ...


1

The following is pure Python and calculates both mean and standard deviation (assuming 1 degree of freedom) in a single pass. It calculates the z-score values in a dictionary directly with a dict comprehension. But note that according to the timing examples below, it is about 3x slower than re-zipping the results of scipy.stats.zscore with the dict keys ...


0

So assuming you want to calculate the zscores of all values in a dictionay. and also assuming you know the mean and standard deviation So what you would simply do is iterate over all the values and store the zscore in another dictionary with the same keys. lets say dic is your dictionay import numpy a={} for key,value in dic.items(): ...


1

Assume d is your dictionary and you want zscores of the values. import scipy.stats as stats keys, vals = zip(*d.items()) z = stats.zscore(vals) newmap = dict(zip(keys,z))


0

assuming you use Scipy to calculate the Z-score and not manually from scipy import stats d = {'keys':values, ...} dict_values = d.values() z = stats.zscore(dict_values) This will return a Numpy array with your z scores


2

You can use base R as well indx <- with(df, paste(Time, Match)) within(df, {indx2 <- TreatmentGroup=='control' Paired_sub <- Response - setNames(Response[indx2], indx[indx2])[setNames(indx, 1:nrow(df))]})[,-7] # TreatmentGroup ID Response Time Match Paired_sub #1 treatment2 ID1 1.2 0 group_1 ...


5

Many options to do this, one of them is with dplyr: require(dplyr) df %>% group_by(Match, Time) %>% mutate(Paired_sub = Response - Response[TreatmentGroup == "control"]) #Source: local data frame [12 x 6] #Groups: Match, Time # # TreatmentGroup ID Response Time Match Paired_sub #1 treatment2 ID1 1.2 0 group_1 -0.6 #2 ...


0

If you want to pick x elements from a weighted set without replacement such that elements are chosen with a probability proportional to their weights: import random def weighted_choose_subset(weighted_set, count): """Return a random sample of count elements from a weighted set. weighted_set should be a sequence of tuples of the form (item, ...


0

You can try to do something like this: OnBeginRequest event, send to user a fake page with only one html form that contains some special generated number or string for this user inside hidden field and after page is loaded automatically send this form back to your server by js. On your server, check this generated number, and if it's valid for this user, ...


0

The only way to clear the statistics from sys.dm_exec_query_stats is to restart the server. If you executed: DBCC FREEPROCCACHE The entries from the sys.dm_exec_query_stats are indeed deleted, but as soon as a new plan is built the statistics remains the same. It is easy to test - pay attention to the exectuion_count column. More information can be ...


1

If you want to pick x elements from a weighted set without replacement such that elements are chosen with a probability proportional to their weights, then your algorithm is wrong. Consider the following weighted list: 'a': weight 1 'b': weight 2 'c': weight 3 and x = 2 In this example, your function should always return 'c' in the result set. This is the ...


1

I'm just trying to do this myself and it sound like you want the command "scipy.stats.binned_statistic_2d" from you can find the mean, median, standard devation or any defined function for the third parameter given the bins. I realise this question has already been answered but I believe this is a good built in solution.


0

You probably have too litte data. You curve indicates your data set has 13 negative and 5 positive examples (in your test set?) Furthermore, all but 4 have exactly the same score (maybe 0)? Or is that your cutoff? Given this small sample size, I would not accept the hypothesis that your proposed method is better than the baseline, but accept the ...


0

Shape of your curve is just a result of high explanatory power of your model and limited number of observations (e.g. take a look at the example here http://nl.mathworks.com/help/stats/perfcurve.html).


0

Change ArrayList<integer> myList = new ArrayList<>(); to static ArrayList<Integer> myArrayList = new ArrayList<>(); And move it out of main into the class so you can use it in dataInput() like this: int i = input.nextInt(); myArrayList.add( i ); There is certainly more to fix but that should get you over your ArrayList blues. ...


1

The default method is "plug-in" so this is the code from MASS:::predict.lda. object is the fit-object and x comes from the newdata argument converted to a matrix: # snipped preamble and error checking means <- colSums(prior * object$means) scaling <- object$scaling x <- scale(x, center = means, scale = FALSE) %*% scaling dm <- ...


1

Just turning this into an answer. You need predict(), the predict.lda method in the MASS package has your exact example in its help page: tr <- sample(1:50, 25) train <- rbind(iris3[tr,,1], iris3[tr,,2], iris3[tr,,3]) test <- rbind(iris3[-tr,,1], iris3[-tr,,2], iris3[-tr,,3]) cl <- factor(c(rep("s",25), rep("c",25), rep("v",25))) z <- ...


0

Create your matrix as column vise using cbind then the norm function works well with Frobenius norm (the Euclidean norm) as an argument. x1<-cbind(1:3) norm(x1,"f") [1] 3.741657 sqrt(1*1+2*2+3*3) [1] 3.741657


1

If I understand you right, you have pre-binned data: interval count [ 0, 10) 1 [ 10, 30) 15 [ 30, 200) 44 [200, 400) 40 total 100 Your code does not work, because hist tries to the bin the values in x by itself. 1 goes to the first interval, 15 to the second and 44 and 40 to the third one. I don't know how to do ...


0

My solution to finding the MSE is below. I used log adjusted daily return data from Bank of America gathered through quantmod. Then I subsetted the data (which had length 1457) into training[1:1437] and testing[1438:1457]. The solution is: forc = function(N){ forecast = matrix(data = NA, nrow = (N) ) for(i in 1:N){ fit = ...


5

The I() notation in the formula syntax in R means 'as is' i.e. I(a+b) simply means add the variable a+b as a predictor in the lm model. In your case I(Wind * Temp^2) means include as a predictor variable the product of Wind and Temp squared. The I() function is used so that there is no confusion with the operators of the formula syntax. For more info page 2 ...


1

Ignoring my own advice, I guessed that the most likely source of any speed problem is unnecessary creation of long vectors. The following C implementation avoids creating four vectors (1:n, 2 * (1:n), 2 * (1:n) - nm, and finally (2*(1:n)-nm)*x). library(inline) gini <- cfunction(signature(x="REALSXP"), " double n = Rf_length(x), nm = n + 1, ans = 0; ...


0

This problem can be solved with directed graphs. Let all the teams be vertices, and directed edge between team1 and team2 means that team1 beat the team2. After that is done, you can divide the graph into strongly connected components, and work with each connected component independently, as they are statistically independent. Or are they? Wink The ...


0

It looks like you're trying to use nested parallelism, which is rather tricky to do, and often isn't necessary. To make your example work, you'd have to create a cluster object on each worker, but then you'll have way too many workers which could horribly bog down your machine. I suggest that you revert "bt.var" to the original sequential version, and only ...


3

I think it's very much an R question. When you do this: NE = location[location==NE] You might have thought that you were creating a logical variable that could be multiplied by other variables to create an interaction term. Not so. Because the logical comparison was done within the "[" (Extract) operator, it selected only the values of location that ...


2

Here's another option: > c(y %*% p) [1] 0.007


5

You can use weighted.mean: weighted.mean(y, p) # [1] 0.007


0

Because the newly-spawned R processes are newly-spawned - i.e., they're default processes. That means that they don't have the parallel package loaded locally. Try adding clusterEvalQ(cl, library(parallel)).


0

Your question has two MSE functions: one in the first code block and one in the second code block. Also, library(forecast) is needed to run Arima and forecast. My understanding of what you are trying to do in the first paragraph is to compute the 20-step ahead forecast error. That is, what is the error in forecasts from model1 20 days ahead, based on ...


0

Two points. It makes no sense to extract the predictor and response as separate items if you are also going to supply a data argument. At worst it will start to fail at strange moments, but at a minimum it will confuse your collaborators. It's going to be much easy to interpret if you have meaningful column names. As Sven points out you can use the "^" ...


0

You can specify the highest order of interactions with ^. y ~ (x[,1] + x[,2] + x[,3]) ^ 2 results in all two-variable interactions and main effects.


4

It doesn't work because the idea of your algorithm is not correct(splitting taking into account only the distance between two adjacent elements does not always yield an optimal solution). You can use dynamic programming instead: 1. Sort the array. 2. Let's assume that f(first_free, sets_count) is the minimum sum of variances if the first_free element is ...


0

If I am understanding this correctly groups A,B and C are actually players A,B and C. Given that I would think that it would be significant to say something like player B averages 23 points per game with a standard deviation of 6.8 so that we could project he scores in the 16 to 30 point per game range. I am further assuming that the four numbers given are ...


0

In this case, two imputation methods can be used: As everyone would try at first, fill with the most likely value i.e. average mean. Predict based on other attributes which is called imputation by regression. Actually, I think the second method seems better for this dataset where users mostly rank more than one product. Also, if you have another ...


0

Why dont you just use the Ratings Percentage Index from wikipedia. You can find it better explain there, but as an fast introduction you use the following formula: RPI = (WP * 0.25) + (OWP * 0.50) + (OOWP * 0.25) WP: Winning Percentage wins / games_played OWP: Calculated by taking the average of the WP's for each of the team's opponents with the ...


0

I have found a solution! ID variable should be sorted! long<-long [order(long.p$ID),] model1<- gee(A~time+BMI, id=ID, corstr= "independence", data = long) Beginning Cgee S-function, @(#) geeformula.q 4.13 98/01/27 running glm to get initial regression estimate (Intercept) time BMI 122.389 ...


3

You want to make a best estimate of a probability (or multiple probabilities) and continuously update your estimate as more data become available. That calls for Bayesian inference! Bayesian reasoning is based on the observation that the probability (distribution) of two things, A and B, being the case at the same time is equal to the probability ...


0

numpy.linalg.lstsq is the simplest method, in my opinion. import numpy as np y = [-6,-5,-10,-5,-8,-3,-6,-8,-8] x = ...


0

Jean-loup's answer works well for the question as posed. However having a working, simple implementation allowed me to think about the problem a bit more and I'm posting the approach I came up with too in case it is useful. def split_population2(seq, n_bins): """ Split a population into sub-populations Based on binning the data into n_bins and ...


1

If you have a-priori informations about your distribution, e.g.: there are exactly two 'groups' of samples which are consecutives within the groups. Then you can use a naive algorithm: find the larger gap between two samples. But the problem of spliting a population into subsets (clusters) is non-trivial, and is usually resolved via machine learning ...


1

I figured out how to extract the mean and stdev by: x1 = str(m.components[index]) x2 = x1[26:-2].split(",") mean, stdev = list(map(float,x2)) My x1 grabs the 'ProductDist: \n Normal: [mean, stdev]\n' which prints when you 'print m'. The x2 grabs the 'mean, stdev' into an array, and the last line maps the string versions of the mean and the stdev to ...


0

Given you have an additive lm model to begin with, drawing the lines is pretty straightforward, even though not completely intuitive. I tested it with the following simulated data: y <- rnorm(30) a <- rep(1:10,times=3) b <- rep(c(1,0),each=15) LM <- lm(y~a+b) You have to access the coefficient values in the lm. Its is: LM$coefficients Here ...


1

You might want to consider using predict(...) with b=0 and b=1, as follows. Since you didn't provide any data, I'm using the built-in mtcars dataset. lmfit <- lm(mpg~wt+cyl,mtcars) plot(mpg~wt,mtcars,col=mtcars$cyl,pch=20) curve(predict(lmfit,newdata=data.frame(wt=x,cyl=4)),col=4,add=T) curve(predict(lmfit,newdata=data.frame(wt=x,cyl=6)),col=6,add=T) ...


0

Unless I've misunderstood the question, all you have to do is run abline again but on a model without the b term. abline(lm(y~a),col="red",lwd=2)


0

You can use biwavelet package (link here) for: continuous wavelet transform (CWT) plotting the spectrum of a signal feature extraction from time-series (due to CWT) coherence analysis of two signals


2

If you look at the code a little further you will see that they are in fact equivalent. Firstly, you forgot the r in your equation for wikipedia. You equation should be: t = r*sqrt((n-2)/(1-r^2)) Now, let's do some simplifying of the STATISTIC <- c(t = sqrt(df) * r/sqrt(1 - r^2)) df is in fact n-2 t = sqrt(n-2)*r/sqrt(1-r^2) rewritten t = r * ...


0

I use a package called "GoHistogram" which provides two streaming approximattion histograms (NumericHistogram and Weighted Numeric Histogram). It is implemented in Golang (https://code.google.com). Here is the link: https://github.com/VividCortex/gohistogram


1

Ok so I am posting an answer to summarize some of the problems you may have. Same subjects in both groups Not averaging: 1-First if we assume that you have only one measure that is repeated every hour for a certain amount of days, that is independent on which day you pick and each hour, then you can reshape your matrix into one column for each subject, ...


0

Alternatively, you can loop over the responses to create a list where each eleemnt corresponds to one model instead of the excellent answer from Roland which generates a 'single' model with multiple responses. This could be usefule if you want (in a later step) work with the generated models seperately: responseList <- names(iris)[-5] modelList <- ...


0

dickoa: I supposse your response wanted to be: open galton list xlist = const parent # or list xlist 0 1 2 matrix X = {xlist} ols child const parent --quiet scalar sigma_u = $sigma matrix res = sigma_u^2 * inv(X'X) res In any case, it is even an easier way to do this: open galton list xlist = const parent # or list xlist 0 1 2 matrix X = {xlist} ols ...



Top 50 recent answers are included