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0

Don't know if you really want the columns as in @James' answer. Here as I understand your question: d %>% group_by(id) %>% mutate_each(funs(norm(.))) Groups: id id x1 x2 1 1 0.0 0.0 2 2 0.0 0.0 3 3 0.0 0.0 ...


2

The problem comes from the use of get, which I'm sure is a breach of the @hadley license agreement ;) To evaluate character arguments, you can use mutate_each_q. However, when using a single function, it will overwrite the variable, so you must use two functions and drop the second variable afterwards: d %>% group_by(id) %>% ...


0

The answer is: c 50 - 80 because there is an increase of 60% between the waves which is significantly more than the other two.


6

Let's start with a reproducible example: # Sample data (9 15-element subsets of the letters stored in a list) set.seed(144) (dfs <- replicate(9, sample(letters, 15), simplify=FALSE)) # [[1]] # [1] "b" "r" "y" "l" "g" "n" "a" "u" "z" "s" "j" "c" "h" "x" "m" # # [[2]] # [1] "b" "n" "m" "t" "i" "f" "a" "l" "k" "u" "o" "c" "g" "v" "p" # ... The venn ...


0

import random total_heads = 0 total_tails = 0 count = 0 while count < 100: coin = random.randint(1, 2) if coin == 1: print("Heads!\n") total_heads += 1 count += 1 elif coin == 2: print("Tails!\n") total_tails += 1 count += 1 print("\nOkay, you flipped heads", total_heads, "times ") print("\nand you flipped tails", ...


0

Caveat: You are probably better off using a text processing package in R or another program. But since no one else has answered, I'll give it a Stata-only shot. There may be an ado file already built that is much better suited, but I'm not aware of one. I'm assuming that each word is a separate variable means that there is a variable word_profit that ...


2

If your dates are in character format like that, then this example seems to work (although you'll get different dates because I've used Sys.time(): > require(sqldf) > HISTORY=data.frame(ID=1:10,START_TIME=as.character(Sys.time()+(1:10)*100000)) > sqldf("select * from HISTORY where START_TIME > '2015-04-26 10:26:01'") ID START_TIME 1 ...


0

The python module timeit also provides a simple command line interface, which is already much more convenient than issuing time commands multiple times: $ python -m timeit -s 'import os' 'os.system("./IsSpace-before")' 10 loops, best of 3: 4.9 sec per loop $ python -m timeit -s 'import os' 'os.system("./IsSpace-after")' 10 loops, best of 3: 4.9 sec per loop ...


2

You could try library(dplyr) HISTORY %>% group_by(ID, TIME = format(START_TIME + 60*60, "%Y-%m-%d %H:00:00")) %>% summarise(MAX_VALUE = max(VALUE)) # ID TIME MAX_VALUE # 1 51 2015-04-17 02:00:00 105 # 2 51 2015-04-17 03:00:00 104 # 3 51 2015-04-17 04:00:00 102 # 4 51 2015-04-17 05:00:00 105 # 5 51 ...


3

Here's another way using data.table library(data.table) setDT(df)[, .(MAX_VALUE = max(VALUE)), by = .(ID, START_TIME = as.POSIXct(START_TIME, format = "%F %H") + 3600)] # ID START_TIME MAX_VALUE # 1: 51 2015-04-17 02:00:00 105 # 2: 51 2015-04-17 03:00:00 104 # 3: 51 2015-04-17 04:00:00 102 # 4: 51 2015-04-17 ...


1

Here's a possible solution using data.table library(data.table) setDT(df)[, max(VALUE), by = .(START_TIME = sub(":.*", "", START_TIME))] START_TIME V1 1: 2015-04-17 01 105 2: 2015-04-17 02 104 3: 2015-04-17 03 102 4: 2015-04-17 04 105 5: 2015-04-17 05 105


2

Cross-validation is a way to address the tradeoff between bias and variance. When you obtain a model on a training set, your goal is to minimize variance. You can do this by adding more terms, higher order polynomials, etc. But your true objective is to predict outcomes for points that your model has never seen. That's what holding out the test set ...


0

If there are leading/lagging spaces for the concerned variables, this could happen mydata$group[with(mydata, Injury=='MMCAI' & place=='core')] <- 'IC' mydata # Na_RR place Injury group #1 231 core MMCAI IC #2 232 core MMCAI <NA> #3 233 core MMCAI <NA> #4 234 core MMCAI <NA> #5 235 core MMCAI ...


0

According to the updating rules on each step for partial least square based on the score and loading vectors, one can try to generate the pls components one at the time.'trainx' is the matrix containing the covariates and 'trainy' is the matrix of response variables. require("pls") require('chemometrics') ...


0

Well I agree with @MrFlick. You might want to think of providing arguments to your map functions. For example. library(maps) mfunc <- function(x,y){ map(database = x, bg = y) } mfunc(x = "world", y = "#d4d5d1") Then once all your map functions are defined you can use par(mfrow = c(a,b)). But just based on the info you have ...


0

MuPAD is not Matlab. From the current version documentation for stats::swGOFT, it appears that this function requires a list, as opposed to an array (what Matlab uses). Many MuPAD functions automatically coerce inputs to the desired format, but that doesn't seem to occur in this case. You have several options if you want to call this function from Matlab ...


1

If you still want to calculate binomial in java by using only standard edition You can use below class like below. calling sample BinomialConfidenceCalc.calcBin(13, 100,95.0D); public class BinomialConfidenceCalc { public static double binP(double N,double p,double x1,double x2){ double q = p/(1-p); double k = 0.0; double v = ...


1

In order to create a stacking ensemble you need to use the table you have created at the end of your question i.e. this: NB k = 5 k = 10 dectree Logistic TrueLabel bob 1 1 bob FALSE bob bob 2 2 john TRUE john bob 1 1 bob TRUE bob The answer to 'should they all be ...


1

Insert the following code under links <- XML::xpathSApply(doc, "//a/@href") in your function. links <- XML::xpathSApply(doc, "//a/@href") links1 <- links[grepl("http", links)] # As @Floo0 pointed out this is to capture non relative links links2 <- paste0(url, links[!grepl("http", links)]) # and to capture relative links links <- c(links1, ...


0

You have fewer observations than features, so the covariance matrix V computed by the scipy code is singular. The code doesn't check this, and blindly computes the "inverse" of the covariance matrix. Because this numerically computed inverse is basically garbage, the product (x-y)*inv(V)*(x-y) (where x and y are observations) might turn out to be negative. ...


0

I had the same problem.For me, it was caused due to not having enough disk space on the drive where R studio was installed.Freeing up space works.


1

The built-in function lm gives at least one version, not sure if this is what you are looking for: fit <- lm(yield ~ N + P + K, data = npk) summary(fit) Gives: Call: lm(formula = yield ~ N + P + K, data = npk) Residuals: Min 1Q Median 3Q Max -9.2667 -3.6542 0.7083 3.4792 9.3333 Coefficients: Estimate Std. Error t ...


1

Non-linear least squares (nls) objects do not come with a plotting method in R the way that linear models (lm) objects do. You can confirm this by running getS3method("plot", "nls"). Some of your options are: Build a plot yourself, such as is described here You could use the nlme package's method for plotting nls objects: library(nlme) plot(fit) On ...


0

from statsmodels.stats.libqsturng import psturng, qsturng provides cdf (or tail probabilities) and quantile function (inverse of cdf or of survival function, I don't remember) It was written by Roger Lew as a package for interpolating the distribution of the studentized range statistic and was incorporated in statsmodels for use in tukeyhsd. Until now it ...


1

You need to use covariance and not correlation coefficient. The correlation coefficient is normalized by the variance of each variable to give the same weight to all variables when they have different ranges, and this is exactly what you want to avoid. x1 = 50+30*rand(1000,1); x2 = rand(1000,1); x3 = rand(1000,1); y = x1+x2+x3; c=cov([x1 x2 x3 y]); ...


2

I believe you are not using the latest version of scipy. Run this command: $python -c "import scipy; print scipy.__version__" and see if you version is 0.15.1. If not, you should upgrade your scipy in order to use function combine_pvalues.


2

You're right about this usually being about bat starting values, and that's (part of) your case. Looking at your data and your guesses, it's clear that something is wrong. But before going into that, note that Framed was not created in the correct order. It should be X Y, or: Framed <- data.frame(Height, Value) With that in mind, try the following: ...


1

Actually scikit-learn doesn't really have many generalized linear models, and the statsmodels package might be better suited.


0

This is what I've got, using the pairwise.mahalanobis function from the HDMD package: #data a = structure(list(Sp = structure(c(1L, 2L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 1L, 1L, 3L,4L, 4L, 2L, 3L, 1L, 3L), .Label = c("A", "B", "C", "D"), class = "factor"), X1 = c(0.7, 0.8, 0.8, 0.3, 0.4, 0.1, 0.2, 0.1, 0.6, 0.8,0.4, 0.1, 0.4, 0.5), X2 = ...


0

First, the error message says that your variable name is not Before. I'll assuming (for lack of anything else) that this is stored in a variable named dat; the chances of that being correct are rather low, so just replace dat with your actual variable name. Second, that is not how to aggregate summary statistics on a subset of your data. It appears that you ...


0

If you have the ability to observe sufficiently many replicates of the process, or to observe a single replicate for a sufficiently long time, and to assume that it is a finite-order Markov process, you can estimate the transition probabilities the Markov process. This will tell you, for example, what the probability of getting "TRUE" is, based on the ...


0

As I mentioned in the comments above, pareto.fit() is not what you're looking for. The .fit() methods of the continuous distributions in scipy.stats obtain an estimate of the parameters of the distribution that maximise the probability of observing some particular set of sample values. Therefore, pareto.fit() wants only a single array argument containing ...


0

If you need avg value then you can use such code. CREATE TABLE #test ( date DATE, value NUMERIC(10,2) ) INSERT INTO #test VALUES ('2014-01-01' , 1248.56 ), ('2014-01-02' , 1247.24), ('2014-01-03' , 1245.82), ('2014-01-04' , 1252.07); SELECT * FROM #test a CROSS JOIN (SELECT AVG(value) avg_value FROM #test) b WHERE a.value < ...


0

you can try something like this SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Table1 WHERE Value < (SELECT AVG(Value) FROM Table1)


0

You can try this open source code for this. It implements the iterator. Click Available in PHP, Java.


1

What you see is normalization. >>> import scipy.stats as stats >>> stats.norm.pdf(1384, 1384, 373) 0.0010695503496016962 >>> stats.norm.pdf(0, 0, 373) 0.0010695503496016962 >>> >>> 1 / np.sqrt(2.*np.pi) / 373 0.0010695503496016962 With a unit variance: >>> stats.norm.pdf(0, 0, 1) 0.3989422804014327 ...


1

I over-complicated everything - and misunderstood the meaning of two of the variables. No wonder my code did work. But i got it to work today N = 1000 % Length of path investigated patchL = 1:1:20; % length of continious patch which you are interested in testing. An = zeros(N+1,length(patchL)); % preallocate memory for zz = 1:length(patchL) x = ...


5

For random variables X and Y use the fact that E(X-Y) = EX - EY, sd(X) = sqrt(var(X)) and var(X-Y) = var(X) + var(Y). The last equation assumes X and Y are uncorrelated. Now, if we label the peaks A, B, C then there exist the differences A-B, A-C and B-C which is 3 difference values, not 2 (6 differences if A-B and B-A etc. are distinguised). They are ...


0

The quote from the documentation you supplied tells us that scale transformation occurs before any statistical analysis pertaining to the plot. The example provided in the documentation is especially informative, since it involves regression analysis. In the case of scale transformation, i.e. using d <- subset(diamonds, carat > 0.5) qplot(carat, ...


0

As you are plotting the histogram, the y-axis represents the number of counts for a specific interval. If you have a longer or shorter input vector, the values of the histogram will be very different. The histogram can be used as an approximation to the probability density (PDF), but for that you need to scale it correctly. The integral of a PDF from ...


0

First off, your variable model has a length of $1 because the first time it is seen, it's 'S'. Define lengths for variables, always. Second, you need to assign rand('uniform') to a variable for your type calculations. The code above should sometimes not assign model, because each call is a new random number. You do it right for car_type_perc and such, ...


1

Let's say you have a list of floats like this: >>> data = { ... 'a': [0.9, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2], ... 'b': [0.8, 0.9, 1.0, 1.1], ... 'c': [4.9, 5.0, 5.1, 5.2], ... } Clearly, a is very similar to b, but both are different from c. There are two kinds of comparisons you may want to do. Pairwise: Is a similar to b? Is a similar to c? Is b ...


0

numpy.argsort(x) goes for a toss with pandas series. It doesn't work as expected, after the first group because index is no longer from 0-n. Instead work on x, y Numpy Arrays. This works. def theil_sen(x,y): x = x.values y = y.values n = len(x) ord = numpy.argsort(x) xs = x[ord] ys = y[ord] vec1 = numpy.zeros( (n,n) ) ...


0

Try this: #data x <- c(5,3,7,11,12,19,40,2,22,6,10,12,12,4) #expected new length N=90 #number of numbers between 2 numbers my.length.out=round((N-length(x))/(length(x)-1))+1 #new data x1 <- unlist( lapply(1:(length(x)-1), function(i) seq(x[i],x[i+1],length.out = my.length.out))) #plot par(mfrow=c(2,1)) plot(x) plot(x1)


0

Sorry to bring this question back up, but I was looking for an answer to this myself. The specific criterion used (e.g. AIC, BIC) does not affect the results of regsubsets since the function only compares against models of the same size and AIC differs from BIC only by the "penalty" assigned to model size. However, if you're interested in comparing models ...


0

I discovered that Ordinal Logistic Regressions don't have reference groups for the dependent variable. Only multinomial logistic regressions do, so that's why I couldn't do it.


0

Something like this? > x<-c(5,3,7,11,12,19,40,2,22,6,10,12,12,4) > seq(min(x),max(x),length=90) [1] 2.000000 2.426966 2.853933 3.280899 3.707865 4.134831 4.561798 [8] 4.988764 5.415730 5.842697 6.269663 6.696629 7.123596 7.550562 [15] 7.977528 8.404494 8.831461 9.258427 9.685393 10.112360 10.539326 [22] 10.966292 11.393258 ...


0

Use the event= to specify your ref in the dependent variable. model depvar(event='myref')=indvar1 indvar2;


6

Use right aligment with partial=TRUE, i.e. rollapplyr(..., partial=TRUE) or rollapply(..., align = "right", partial=TRUE). Here we use rollapplyr: rollapplyr(df$a, 4, mean, partial = TRUE)


2

I think it can be simply done with a simple function such as the following (as an alternative solution): rollapply2 <- function(myvec, width, fun){ #the first values up to width firstvalues <- cumsum(myvec[1:(width-1)])/(1:(width-1)) #the rest of the values as normal normalvalues <- rollapply(myvec, width, fun) #return them all ...



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