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0

This solution might help: satisfied <- subset(finalResults, FinancialSatisfaction == "Satisfied") moreorless <- subset(finalResults, FinancialSatisfaction == "More Or Less") notatall <- subset(finalResults, FinancialSatisfaction == "Not At All") myProportion = (nrow(satisfied) + nrow(moreorless)) / nrow(finalResults)


1

You may make use of the iterpc package. library(iterpc) foo = function(index){ sapply(index, function(z){as.numeric(c(z==1,z==2,z==3))}) } To get all possible matrices I = iterpc(c(2,2,3), ordered=TRUE) M = getall(I) sapply(1:nrow(M), function(i) foo(M[i,]), simplify=FALSE) To get the matrices one by one I = iterpc(c(2,2,3), ordered=TRUE) ...


0

I was very close. My Math.NET example was equivalent to (1 - TDIST(0.84, 8009, 2)), so I merely needed to subtract that from 1: double result = 1 - (2 * (1 - StudentT.CDF(0, 1, 8009, 0.84)))


0

Can you try this? library(reshape2) library(ggplot2) #EXEU is your dataframe EXEU<-melt(EXEU,id='country',variable.name='YEAR',value.name='VALUE') ggplot(EXEU,aes(YEAR,VALUE,group=country, color=country))+geom_line() Is this helping? Thanks


0

Upgrade comment: The output gives the parameters (mean and standard deviation) of the normal distribution for each level of the class variable. From the ?naiveBayes help: For each numeric variable, a table giving, for each target class, mean and standard deviation of the (sub-)variable) Run a small example to see this, using the iris dataset: ...


0

First off I would like to point out that there are infinite number of kernels that could be used in a gaussian process. One of the most common however is the RBF (also referred to as squared exponential, the expodentiated quadratic, etc). This kernel is of the following form: The above equation is of course for the simple 1D case. Here l is the length ...


0

A good solution here would be to curl your file. As you already return a JSON string containing your values, just curl your 'check.php' file and json_decode the response. One of the advantages of this method is that you can access these informations from other domains. You should be able to get all the values easily. Example : $ch = curl_init(); ...


1

This isn't available in the survey package and I'm fairly sure it isn't available in R. There are techniques for generalised linear mixed model fitting with survey data when the clusters for the random effects are the same as the sampling units. There are implementations in Stata (-gllamm-) and MLwin and possibly others. Design-based inference for mixed ...


0

Read the file like this: file_as_data_frame <- read.table("file.txt", colClasses="numeric")


0

Are you using SPSS Modeler or SPSS Statistics? Because I created an extension to determine the optimal number of clusters. It is based on R: Cluster analysis in R: determine the optimal number of clusters


0

Because you know exactly the margin of error, you can modify the weights with a randomly generated double (between -5.0 and 5.0) and then run your proposed simulation. This function will simulate the desired margin of error : void simulating_margin_of_error(std::mt19937 gen, double marginOfError, int* option0, int* option1) { ...


4

The switch function can be used but is unfortunately not vectorized so one needs to "sapply" the arguments to it: x <- c("en","en-gb","en-GB","nl","msa","ru","other1","other2") sapply(x, function(z) switch(z, 'en'=, 'en-gb' =, 'en-GB'= "Level 1", 'nl'= "Level 2", 'msa' = "Level 3", 'ru' = "Level 4", "All others") ) You get a ...


1

unless I'm missing something obvious, you're basically asking how to define the levels of a factor? Your example data doesn't have all 33 levels that you state in the question. However, I added some that you referenced. Essentially you need to create a variable in a dataframe that has the information about what factor level each language should be - ...


0

The candidate_probability you are using would not be statistically correct. I think that what you would have to do is calculate the probabilities of the sample point being a member of only one of the individual gaussians (from the weights and multivariate cumulative distribution functions (CDFs)) and sum up those probabilities. The largest problem is that I ...


0

Well. Depends on what you're interested in. Makes it a lot easier if we know what kind of data you have, and what you're trying to analyse. Trying to answer your question: If you assume that there is some underlying structure which is homogenous for, say, 6 of the subjects, and different for the other half, you can just pool the two data sets and do some ...


0

It looks like you found the github issue for this already. As you found, you can't do this yet, but we will hopefully have this functionality in 0.7. If you're feeling adventurous, you can install the branch mentioned in the issue.


0

I'm going to try my best to help here, but if someone else has a better answer, of course please follow their advice. First, start by building your unconditional model - a model without any predictor or independent variables. In your case, it looks like A represents the level 2 groups. Here would be the unconditional model using the nlme package you appear ...


2

Version 1.9 of numpy features a handy 'interpolation' argument to help you get to 4. a = numpy.array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]) numpy.percentile(a, 75, interpolation='higher') - numpy.percentile(a, 25, interpolation='lower')


3

You have 7 numbers which you are attempting to split into quartiles. Because 7 is not divisible by 4 there are a couple of different ways to do this as mentioned here. Your way is the first given by that link, wolfram alpha seems to be using the third. Numpy is doing basically the same thing as wolfram however its interpolating based on percentiles (as ...


0

Your answer is right as the maximum value needed for encoding. But consider the following coding scheme 1 - red (1/2 prob), 01 - blue (1/4 prob), 00 - green (1/8 prob), 001 - black (1/16 prob), 000 - white (1/16 prob) multiply message length by probability and you should have 1 + 5/8 ( not 15/8 ... though)


0

using static huffman compression you can encode the more common colours in fewer bits than the rare colours, that being the case on can expect that common colours will usually be chosen. eg: red 1 blue 01 green 001 white 0001 black 0000 on average from 16 draws there will be 8 reds = 8 bits 4 blues = 8 bits 2 greens = 6 bits 1 white = 4 ...


1

I'mma throw this out there too as an equivalent R expression norm_vec(x) <- function(x){sqrt(crossprod(x))} Don't confuse R's crossprod with a similarly named vector/cross product. That naming is known to cause confusion especially for those with a physics/mechanics background.


0

Sort of hackish and possibly inefficient, but I think this could be what you're looking for: import scipy.spatial.distance as dist import scipy.stats as ss # Pearson's correlation coefficients print dist.squareform(dist.pdist(data, lambda x, y: ss.pearsonr(x, y)[0])) # p-values print dist.squareform(dist.pdist(data, lambda x, y: ss.pearsonr(x, ...


0

You reference the documentation for SAS/STAT 13.1, in which the FP option is documented and supported. However, based on what SAS is telling you it expects in the PROC NPAR1WAY statement, it looks like you don't have SAS/STAT 13.1. The FP option was new to 12.1, the release prior to 13.1, before which it was not available. (See here for the enhancements ...


1

According to the github thread this should be fixed in the newest master branch.


1

There is no SVG Elements, change point to g: svg.append('g').selectAll('circle') .data(plotPoints) .enter() .append('circle') .attr('cx', function (d) {console.log(d.score); return x(d.score);}) .attr('cy', function (d) {console.log(y(0.002)); return y(0.002);}) .attr('r', 3) .attr('class','red');


1

You could fit a linear regression model. Since this is a programming site, here is some R code: > d <- read.table("data.tsv", sep="\t", header=T) > summary(lm(log(Bytes.RAM) ~ log(Rows) + log(Columns), d)) Call: lm(formula = log(Bytes.RAM) ~ log(Rows) + log(Columns), data = d) Residuals: Min 1Q Median 3Q Max -0.4800 -0.2409 ...


1

There is no mention of a mode function in the official docs (see Built-in Aggregate Functions). But the query to get the mode of a column is pretty simple, so a native function might not be necessary. select age from ( select age, count(age) as age_cnt from mytable group by age order by age_cnt desc limit 1 ) t1


3

I would vectorize the whole thing. There is no real reason to run 100 iterations when you can just generate 800 observations in one run. Then just use matrix and colSums and you done set.seed(123) n <- 100 Z <- colSums(matrix(runif(8 * n), 8, n)) Z # [1] 4.774425 4.671171 4.787691 4.804041 3.513257 2.330163 3.300135 3.568657 5.503481 2.861764 ...


0

I would try using the "conversions" feature from searchkick. You can use that to persist queries as listed in the readme. I haven't tried it myself, but I would thisnk Redis would be a good choice to persist these data.


2

You could use the function lm, which runs a linear regression (in the end, ANOVA and ANCOVA are just restricted versions of the linear model). mod <- lm(output ~ input + category, data=data) You can view the output with the summary function summary(mod) If you really need to have the output 'ANOVA style', then you can apply the function anova ...


1

This is my approach. It employs the allperm routine of SAS to populate all permutations. Then in order to eliminate duplicates, I use the product of the numbers in a group as the key. The result is 1680. After this, you can use by keyword of proc glm to run based on the group indicator group in the final data set. proc transpose data=anova(keep=resp) ...


1

norm(c(1,1), type="2") # 1.414214 norm(c(1, 1, 1), type="2") # 1.732051


0

If I understand your question correctly, you're asking about divisive clustering (you have a given set of data and want to re-cluster them with a larger number of groups than before). Most algorithms I'm familiar with would require re-building the clustering basically from scratch. However, you might want to look at the BIRCH algorithm. Since it stores only ...


0

Hope this helps, it plots ROC curve using face data, non face data function thresh = ComputeROC( Cparams, Fdata, NFdata ) %function ComputeROC compute the ROC curve face_fnames = dir(Fdata.dirname); full_face = 3:length(face_fnames); test_face = setdiff(full_face, Fdata.fnums); num_tf = size(test_face,2); nface_fnames = ...


2

Resampling like this can be done with a few steps. First, following an example from SAS help, use PROC SQL to create a table with all the possible combinations of var and resp. PROC SQL; CREATE TABLE possibilities AS SELECT a.var, b.resp FROM anova a CROSS JOIN anova b; QUIT; Then, resample from all the possible combinations of var and resp using PROC ...


0

In general, if you have negative values in the data that you are displaying, use a bar chart instead of a pie chart. Pie charts are supposed to represent a part of a total, a part-to-whole relationship, thus negative numbers won't work because you can't have a negative part of a total. In case that you actually want to just show that value, try wrapping it ...


1

Try aggregate from base R aggregate(votes~id, df, FUN=sum) # id votes #1 1 40 #2 2 46 #3 3 44 #4 5 28 #5 7 90 #6 9 57 or library(dplyr) df %>% group_by(id) %>% summarise(votes=sum(votes)) or library(data.table) setDT(df)[, list(votes=sum(votes)), by=id]


0

You could just plot the results and see that it gives something very similar: # slightly improved version of my.ecdf my.ecdf<-function(x,t) { out<-numeric(length(t)) for(i in 1:length(t)) { indicator <- as.numeric(x<=t[i]) out[i] <- sum(indicator)/length(t) } out } # test 1 x <- rnorm(1000) plot(ecdf(x)) lines(seq(-4, 4, ...


1

To add the percentages you just need to set the argument plot.percents to TRUE. I don't know a good solution for the subheading, but you can play around with the ggtitle and theme functions of the ggplot2 package. Here is one idea: plot(l28, plot.percents = TRUE) + ggtitle("Percentage of Strongly disagree/Disagree Percentage of Strongly agree/Agree") + ...


0

A general tip - you can view the source code of any function by typing its name into the console without parentheses or arguments: edcf function (x) { x <- sort(x) n <- length(x) if (n < 1) stop("'x' must have 1 or more non-missing values") vals <- unique(x) rval <- approxfun(vals, cumsum(tabulate(match(x, ...


0

Some ideas. (1) Try it with a smaller covariance (say 2x2 or 3x3 until you get it working). (2) Verify that your covariance matrices are nonsingular by computing their eigenvalues. Are they really all greater than zero? If so, are they "not too small"? I can imagine that very small (i.e. magnitude the same size as floating point epsilon) might cause ...


2

There isn't, unfortunately. However, you can roll your own by using the model's hypothesis testing methods on each of the terms. In fact, some of their ANOVA methods do not even use the attribute ssr (which is the model's sum of squared residuals, thus obviously undefined for a binomial GLM). You could probably modify this code to do a GLM ANOVA.


1

Here's a ggplot solution. library(ggplot2) ggplot(data, aes(x=factor(Memory.Code),y=Compound_A))+ geom_boxplot(aes(fill=factor(Age.Code)),position=position_dodge(.9))+ scale_fill_discrete(name="Age.Code")+labs(x="Memory.Code") Here's the way using base R. boxplot(Compound_A~factor(Age.Code)+factor(Memory.Code),data)


0

Try the following: varnames <- c("Variable1","Variable2") for (curvar in varnames) { print(curvar) print(friedman.test(table1[,curvar] ~ Time | Patient, data=table1) }


0

The function as.formula() is the key to this. I will explain with a small example. From the build-in warpbreaks dataset (see ?friedman.test) : wb <- aggregate(warpbreaks$breaks, by = list(w = warpbreaks$wool, t = warpbreaks$tension), FUN = mean) > friedman.test(x ~ w | t, data = wb) ...


0

The MASS package has the fitdistr function that can be used to do this, although binomial is not one of the built in distributions: fitdistr(0:10, dbinom, start=list(prob=.2), size=10)


4

I don't know how renormalization is done traditionally in KDE estimation, but by judging from this piece of the code in ksdensity that deals with support (Run type ksdensity or edit ksdensity in your MATLAB command window) function ty = apply_support(yData,L,U) % Compute transformed values of data if L==-Inf && U==Inf % unbounded support ty = ...


1

If you use -Inf and Inf you can define the "edge" cases more "inclusifvely": > table(cut(y_1, c(-Inf,20,40,60,80, Inf), rightmost.closed=TRUE) ) (-Inf,20] (20,40] (40,60] (60,80] (80, Inf] 21 20 20 20 20 This also leaves clear that the right sides of the intervals are closed (which your question only hinted ...


1

This is your vector. y_1 <- 0:100 First, let's define the thresholds for the split. vectorThresholds <- c(20, 40, 60, 80, Inf) Then, we can define a new vector containing a number corresponding to the interval. y_2 <- sapply(y_1, function(el){ min(which(el < vectorThresholds)) }) In order to name the levels, you can just use factor. ...



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