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Firebase Hosting does not have built in analytics that you can access. If you want to add a third-party in-page analytics tool to your pages, there are tons of those to choose from. Recommending such products is off-topic for StackOverflow though.


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This would be one way to do it with dplyr We can take advantage of 2 things here: you have a column full of true/false values and the fact that the amount of mismatch you have is just 1 minus the proportion of matches. library(dplyr) # test data data <- data.frame(group = factor(c(1,1,1,2,2)), col1 = c(1,1,1,1,0), col2 = c(0,0,0,0,0), ...


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You are not passing the lower argument to the function fitdistr which leads it to make a search in positive and negative domain. By passing the lower argument to function fitt <- fitdistr(x,"t", start = list(m=mean(x),s=sd(x)), df=3, lower=c(-1, 0.001)) you get no NaNs -as you did in your manual optimisation. EDIT: fitt <- fitdistr(x,"t", start = ...


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It signifies a confidence level of 95%. You say "why not 0.01", and the answer is: you can use 99% confidence, and sometimes you need to be that sure. But in most cases 95% is good enough.


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Each non-keyword argument passed to scipy.stats.kruskal is treated as a separate group of y-values. By passing x as one of the arguments, kruskal attempts to treat your label strings as though they were a second group of y-values. The strings will get cast to NaNs (which ought to raise a RuntimeWarning). Instead, you need to group your y values by label, ...


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I am having trouble reading your question based on the lack of formatting, but I think this is what you want. df$match=ifelse(df$A == df$B, TRUE, FALSE)


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We can use == to get the logical index df1$match <- df1[,1]==df1[,2] df1 # col1 col2 match #1 F M FALSE #2 F M FALSE #3 F M FALSE #4 F M FALSE #5 M M TRUE #6 M F FALSE #7 F F TRUE #8 F F TRUE #9 F M FALSE #10 F M FALSE #11 F F TRUE #12 M F FALSE #13 M M TRUE #14 ...


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If, and only if, x3 is just a bunch of 1's and 0's you could just switch the values. x3 <- c(1,1,0,0) # old x3 x3_no <- 1 - x3 Then just use x3_no in the multiple regression. dat$x3_no <- 1 - dat$x3 glm(y ~ your_linear_predictor, family = binomial) You may also want to update this function so you have less errors. attach <- ...


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By default multivariate_normal checks whether any of the eigenvalues of the covariance matrix are less than some tolerance chosen based on its dtype and the magnitude of its largest eigenvalue (take a look at the source code for scipy.stats._multivariate._PSD and scipy.stats._multivariate._eigvalsh_to_eps for the full details). As @kazemakase mentioned ...


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Just import your data as a DataFrame and apply required aggregations: import org.apache.spark.sql.DataFrame; import static org.apache.spark.sql.functions.*; DataFrame df = sqlContext.read() .format("org.apache.spark.sql.cassandra") .option("table", someTable) .option("keyspace", someKeyspace) .load(); ...


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In general, compile scala file: $ scalac Main.scala create your java source file from Main.class file: $ javap Main More info is available at following url: http://alvinalexander.com/scala/scala-class-to-decompiled-java-source-code-classes


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I suggest checking out https://github.com/datastax/spark-cassandra-connector/tree/master/spark-cassandra-connector-demos Which contains demos in both Scala and the equivalent Java. You can also check out: http://spark.apache.org/documentation.html Which has tons of examples that you can flip between Scala, Java, and Python versions. I'm almost 100% ...


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Cast it. (double) Variable_here will be the variable's value, but as a double.


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You just need to reorder the factor levels x3 = factor(x3, levels = c("yes","no")) glm uses this ordering.


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cooks.distance(fit) Will generate a vector of Cook's Distance values.


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You could group by Clicks and take the average of the Sales per group: In [307]: sales = df.groupby('Clicks')['Sales'].mean(); sales Out[307]: Clicks 5 10.5 10 18.0 15 27.0 100 200.0 Name: Sales, dtype: float64 Then form the piecewise linear interpolating function based on the groupwise-averaged data above using interpolate.interp1d: ...


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Use the scipy function scipy.stats.linregress to fit your data. Maybe also check https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_regression to better understand linear regression.


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Recheck your integrals. E[x] = mu != x*1/we^((-x-s)/w)dx but rather is equal to x*1/we^((-(x-s)/w)dx = s + w. I guess all your other errors follow because of the mistake in carrying forward the sign: -(x-s) = -x + s. By the way, this density function corresponds to the shifted exponential distribution. Because if you take X to be exponentially distributed ...


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Nev, you seem to have some contradictory lines of code: exprs <- matrix(as.numeric(exprs[,2:(ncol(exprs)-1)]),nrow=nrow(exprs)) changes the data frame to a matrix, so exprs$tissue will not make sense. You can get that column as exprs[,7]. Also exprs <- matrix(as.numeric(exprs[,2:(ncol(exprs)-1)]),nrow=nrow(exprs)) is not necessary. You don't have to ...


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See warning: sjp.int is already masked by your global Environment. You need to clear your workspace first, then it should work. Also, compare both plotting types type = "cond" and type = "eff".


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You can just do this. do if $casenum <= 10. xsave outfile="c:/temp/firstten.sav". end if.


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Use only the generic function in R. >d=data.frame(type=as.factor(rep(c("A","B","C"),each=3)), x=rnorm(9),y=rgamma(9,2,1)) > d type x y 1 A -1.18077326 3.1428680 2 A -0.91930418 4.4606603 3 A 0.88345422 1.0979301 4 B 0.06964133 1.1429911 5 B -1.15380345 2.7609049 6 B 1.13637202 0.6668986 7 C -1.12052765 ...


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Would something like the following suffice? https://en-gb.wordpress.org/plugins/aryo-activity-log/


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Rather than just extracting a few fields from a single line, this will parse the entire block of output into a useful data structure. Each of the labels becomes a hash key, and for the special case of the first two lines, the sub-labels get appended to the main labels to form unique keys. use strict; use warnings; use Data::Dump; my %stats; while ...


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You would benefit from studying regular expressions more, and how to use capturing groups, but for this specific case, you'd probably want something like this. if ($line =~ /^Number of files:\s+(\d+)\s+\(reg:\s+(\d+),\s+dir:\s+(\d+)\)/) { $numfiles = $1; $regfiles = $2; $dirfiles = $3; }


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To assign value in constructor use this: private double data[]; public Stats (double[] val) { this.data = val; }


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You could start by calculating the center of gravity for each dataset using numpy.mean and compare how close their are to one another. Next step is to check the if each center is inside the uncertainty ellipse (http://www.visiondummy.com/2014/04/draw-error-ellipse-representing-covariance-matrix/) of the other dataset. Finally, I would recommend to using ...


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You usually cannot convert these metrics. They measure subtly different things. But linear error is not the same as squared error. Winning in one metric does not mean winning on a different metric. Assume we want to summarize univariate data into a single number. The mean minimizes squared error, the median linear error - so they have different optimal ...


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This is O(n/2) Item PickItem(float cost, float size, float weight, float temperature) { var bestDiff = float.MaxValue; Item bestItem = null; foreach(var item in items) { var diff = CaluclateDifference(item, cost, size, weight, temperature); if(diff < bestDiff) { bestDiff = diff; bestItem = ...


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Thanks everyone for helping me. Here is the working code if anyone wants to use it for finding error and sample size in Confidence Intervals. #include "stdafx.h" #include <cstdlib> #include <stdio.h> #include <math.h> #pragma warning(disable: 4996) int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[]) { double sample = 0, z = 0, sample1 = 0; double std = ...


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There are three sqrt functions in C++: double sqrt(double _X); float sqrt(float _X); long double sqrt(long double _X); You have sample declared as an int (which can convert to float or double), so the compiler doesn't know which function to call. You could pick the one you want and typecast, sqrt((double)sample), or you probably just want to declare ...


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The maybe best way might be (as @Erica already suggested) to take the distance as the sum of the distances of the closest points, but beware, this is NOT SYMMETRIC, hence not a real distance in the mathematician way. To gain symmetric you might add it with the same sum of the other object, this will yield a mathematician distance method. Another way would ...


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Consider the quicksort algorithm. It uses a pivot element to divide a set in two: one with elements smaller than the pivot element and one with bigger elements. It then goes on to sort each smaller set. If you are only interested in finding a particular quantile, then any subset that lies entirely outside the quantile does not need to be sorted further. In ...


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The obvious way of getting a random sample from a binomial distribution using a for loop is: import random def binomial_random_sample(n, p): ret = 0 for j in range(n): if random.random() < p: ret += 1 return ret Or if you prefer a more terse approach: def binomial_random_sample(n, p): return sum(random.random() ...


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The way to solve your task can be found on Wikipedia, but it is a very small section: One way to generate random samples from a binomial distribution is to use an inversion algorithm. To do so, one must calculate the probability that P(X=k) for all values k from 0 through n. (These probabilities should sum to a value close to one, in order to ...


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If I understand the problem right, you are testing for a Binomial distribution with the mean under the null equal to 0.2 and the alternative being null greater than 0.2? If so, then on line 2 of you function g, shouldn't it be sigma <- sqrt(.2*(1-.2)) instead of sigma <- sqrt(.5*(1-.5))? That way, your standard deviation will be smaller, resulting in a ...


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We can use any of the group by operations library(data.table) setDT(X)[, t.test(Viability)$p.value, by = Cross] # Cross V1 #1: 1F 0.0001825647 #2: 1M 0.0031854465 #3: 2M 0.0011197313 #4: 3M 0.0001486875 #5: 4M 0.0019277856 #6: 5M 0.0005531744 We can do pairwise.t.test for the updated question res <- with(X, ...


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Instead of playing with your learning rate i think you need to normalize you initial data set using feature normalization((X- mu)/sigma) then perform the operation that you intend to do. Without feature normalization, gradient descent becomes buggy for large data set at behaves abnormaly.


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Probably you have set an yrange before calling the stats command. If you call stats with a single column, the data is treated as y-column. In your second call you give an explicit second column, and the time data is treated as x-column. Calling reset fmt = "%Y..." stats 'data' u (strptime(fmt,strcol(1))) should work fine.


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You should try Maxmind's GeoLite2 Free database if you need only country detection and it fits your needs and licensing. They have native PHP library for fast integration https://github.com/maxmind/GeoIP2-php


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Assuming, that groups are of equal lengths: getPValue <- function(row) { l <- length(row)/2 x <- row[1:l] y <- row[-(1:l)] fit <- t.test(x,y) return(fit$p.value) } data <- cbind(data,apply(data,1,getPValue)) EDIT: And if you want also to attach absolute mean difference which is being tested for each row, you can use: ...


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OpenTSDB should automatically handle sum/average aggregation of counters when you use them as a rate instead of a raw gauge. It takes two sample points and calculates the difference, giving you total "impressions" between the two sample points. Note it may also change the value to "per second" since that is the standard for OpenTSDB. Whenever the second ...


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From what I understood in the original answer of @Warren Weckesser that you reffered to "all you need to do" is: write an approximation of cdf(b) - cdf(a) as cdf(b) - cdf(a) = pdf(m)*(b - a) where m is, say, the midpoint of the interval [a, b] We can try to to follow his recommendation and plot two ways of getting pdf-values based on central points ...


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Use barplot() data <- c(rep("blue",174),rep("red",224),rep("yellow",230),rep("orange",215),rep("green",195),rep("brown",216)) t <- table(data) barplot(t/sum(t), col=names(t)) or, better use ggplot2 library(ggplot2) data <- c(rep("blue",174),rep("red",224),rep("yellow",230),rep("orange",215),rep("green",195),rep("brown",216)) df <- ...


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How about something like this? Is this what your are after? I don't really know what cp, cpk, LSL and USL are, to be honest. (I renamed hist to dat, as hist is a very commonly used function.) m <- mean(dat$Rundheit) s <- sd(dat$Rundheit) vec <- data.frame(val = c(m, m - 3*s, m + 3*s, m - 5*s, m + 5*s), sigma = factor(c('mean', ...


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Just make a long table with id, measure_id and value instead of a wide table with NA's: n.subjects <- 10 new.df <- data.frame( id = rep(old.df$id, 6), measure_id = rep(1:6, each=n.subjects) values = c(old.df$K1, old.df$K2, ...


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Easiest way IMO: have the frame load a php page when the user navs to a new frame. You could send a var using URLVariables about the current frame (the time using Date(), the previous frame if you're keeping track of that using a variable of sorts, ext). You could also do this when a user clicks a button in a certain frame. You can use an analytics API ...


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It sounds like errorbar(X,Y,ERRORS) would show what you are looking for. Here is an example: >> x = 0:pi/5:2*pi; >> x = 0:pi/6:2*pi; >> y = sin(x); >> errors = abs(cos(x)); >> errorbar(x,y,errors) This produces the plot:


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As pointed out by @Christoph, the problem lies in the way you scale sampled pdf. Because pdf is the density of probability density, if you want the expected frequency in a bin, you should first multiple the density by the bin length to get the approximate probability that a sample will fall in this bin, then you can multiply this probability by the total ...


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The eigenvalues of your matrix are > eigen(j) $values [1] 2.366025e+00 6.339746e-01 4.440892e-16 the last of which is effectively zero, within the limits of numerical precision. Per ?chol: Compute the Choleski factorization of a real symmetric positive-definite square matrix. (emphasis mine) That said, you can still get the decomposition by ...



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