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0

Depends on the distribution of data in the columns. Look up update statistics - you'll find you can specify the selectivity you want to use when running it. The default sampling level depends on the size of the data. Most people run update stats after index work on maintenance plans.


1

This is actually a linear programming problem, so a natural approach would be to use a linear programming solver such as the lpSolve package. You need to provide an objective function and a constraint matrix and the solver will do the rest: library(lpSolve) mod <- lp("min", c(-5, 2, -1), matrix(c(1, 1, 1), nrow=1), "=", 15) Then you can access the ...


0

Can't you simply make a new column of the row names and then reference it directly in the call to apply?


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You can run additional queries to find out how good your match is comparing to the exact match. Then you can take the exact match rank for benchmark as a 100%. DECLARE @Manufacturer varchar(500) DECLARE @tManufacturer varchar(500) DECLARE @maxRank int SET @Manufacturer = 'your search term' SELECT @tManufacturer=Manufacturer FROM ManufacturerTable m INNER ...


0

I wouldn't create a separate data step as suggested by Alex A. That can be a bad habit to develop as, with large datasets, it can be extremely costly in terms of CPU. Rather, I would subset the Proc Means call but slightly differently from Alex A's suggestion since you probably don't want the output generated from a "by" statement since the 'by' statement ...


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You need to define an ODS Output statement. The ODS table names for Proc GLM include Bartlett, which is the test underlying the HOVTEST= option. So, add these lines to your code: ods output bartlett=hovtestoutput; run; proc print data=hovtestoutput; run; Or something like that.


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Thanks to Stephen, I made a short fix on his query, which works well even it's a bit time consuming on large database : SELECT DATE(Stats.Created), NewUsers, NumUsers - NewUsers AS ReturningUsers FROM Stats LEFT JOIN ( SELECT MinDate, COUNT(user_id) AS NewUsers FROM ( SELECT ...


1

On this occasion optim will not work obviously because you have equality constraints. constrOptim will not work either for the same reason (I tried converting the equality to two inequalities i.e. greater and less than 15 but this didn't work with constrOptim). However, there is a package dedicated to this kind of problem and that is Rsolnp. You use it the ...


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You can use ?interact.gbm. See also this cross-validated question, which directs to a vignette of a related technique from the package dismo. In general, these interactions may not necessarily agree with the interaction terms estimated in a linear model.


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Assuming you have a date table somewhere (and using t-sql syntax because I know it better...) the key is to calculate the mindate for each user separately, calculate the total number of users on that day, and then just declaring a returning user to be a user who wasn't new: SELECT DateTable.Date, NewUsers, NumUsers - NewUsers AS ReturningUsers FROM ...


0

Maybe you need to log10(median), since those are the values computed for the y-axis. At low values, those differences might be seen, but at higher values the log scale appears asymptotic for increasing X, which means - any delta X, will yield a very small delta y.


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I was solving the same problem form the interactive python. Here is how I did it. import turtle def plotRegression(data): win = turtle.Screen() win.bgcolor('pink') t = turtle.Turtle() t.shape('circle') t.turtlesize(0.2) x_list, y_list = [i[0] for i in plot_data], [i[1] for i in plot_data] x_list, y_list = [float(i) for i in ...


0

(1) "Is it from distribution X" is generally a question which can be answered a priori, if at all; a statistical test for it will only tell you "I have a large sample / not a large sample", which may be true but not too useful. If you are trying to classify new data into one distribution or another, my advice is to look at it as a classification problem and ...


1

This is not an example of a Lagrange multiplier, and the two equations are not equivalent. However, the paper doesn't claim this: the text states that formula (5) is "modified" to get formula (6). Using a Lagrange multiplier would lead to a coupled system of two equations. Note how formula (6) doesn't exactly enforce the constraint Dc=x, it only minimizes ...


0

For Q-learning you don't need a "model" of the environment (i.e transition probabilities matrix) to estimate the value function as it is a model-free method. For matrix inversion evaluation you refer to dynamic programming (model-based) where you use a transition matrix. You can think of Q-learning algorithm as a kind of trial and error algorithm where you ...


0

You can compute the odds ratio for a -3 s.d. or +3 s.d. change in the independent variable using the coefficient from the logistic regression and the sd function: # Sample data set.seed(144) x <- rnorm(1000) y <- as.numeric(runif(1000) <= 1/(1+exp(-.75*x))) # Train model and compute odds ratios mod <- glm(y~x, family="binomial") exp(c(-3*sd(x), ...


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You should read up on the Lagrange multiplier. It's an easy way to maximize or minimize a function that must at the same fulfil equality constraints (not inequalities).


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class Statistic { /** * The table associated with the model. * * @var string */ public $rounds = []; public function __construct($user_id, $roundid = null, $start = "2000-01-01", $end = "2030-01-01", $courseid = 0){ $this->rounds = Round::where('user_id', '=', $user_id)->get(); } public function score(){ if(count($this->rounds) > ...


1

At last after so many tries came up with these two lines. In [9]: from itertools import groupby In [10]: lst=[list(g) for k,g in groupby(a)] In [21]: [x*len(_lst) if x>=0 else x for _lst in lst for x in _lst] Out[21]: [0, 0, 4, 4, 4, 4, 0, 0, 1, 0, 3, 3, 3, 0]


0

Here's one approach. The basic premise is that when in a consecutive run of positive values, it will remember all the indices of these positive values. As soon as it hits a zero, it will backtrack and replace all the positive values with the length of their run. a=[0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,1,1,0] glob = [] last = None for idx, i in enumerate(a): if ...


2

This is similar to a run length encoding problem, so I've borrowed some ideas from that Rosetta code page: import itertools a=[0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,1,1,0] b = [] for item, group in itertools.groupby(a): size = len(list(group)) for i in range(size): if item == 0: b.append(0) else: b.append(size) b Out[8]: ...


1

Have you tried using the function fitglm? It can fit general linear models and returns p-values and t statistics for all your regressors automatically: mdl = fitglm(X,y,'linear','Distribution','normal') If you'd prefer calculating the t-tests yourself, you can run a t-test for testing whether your weights are significantly different than 0 by calculating ...


0

This might be more appropriate on CrossValidated, but: lme4 is trying to tell you that one or more of your random effects is confounded with the residual variance. As you've described your data, I don't quite see why: you should have 2*46*32=2944 total observations, 2*46=92 combinations of condition and person, and 46*32=1472 combinations of measure and ...


1

That scaling comes from linear algebra. That's what we call normalizing by producing a unit vector. Assuming that each row is an observation and each column is a feature, what's happening here is that we are going through every observation that you collected and normalizing each feature value over all observations such that the overall length / magnitude ...


-1

The formula cited from wikipedia mentioned in the answers cannot be used to calculate normal probabilites. You would have to write a numerical integration approximation function using that formula in order to calculate the probability. That formula computes the value for the probability density function. Since the normal distribution is continuous, you ...


2

You want the anova() method that vegan provides for cca(), the function that does CCA in the package, if you want to test effects in a current model. See ?anova.cca for details and perhaps the by = "margin" option to test marginal terms. To do stepwise selection you have two options Use the standard step() function that works with an AIC-like statistic ...


0

That's probably as fast as you can do it in pure python for reasonably large inputs: def choose(n, k): if k == n: return 1 if k > n: return 0 d, q = max(k, n-k), min(k, n-k) num = 1 for n in xrange(d+1, n+1): num *= n denom = 1 for d in xrange(1, q+1): denom *= d return num / denom


0

You can check this out, if you need Premier League Results https://github.com/openfootball


1

A simple way is to calculate the difference between every two neighbouring samples, eg diff= abs(y[x point 1] - y[x point 0]) and calculate the standard deviation for all the differences. This will rank the differences in order for you and also help eliminate random noise which you get if you just sample largest diff values. If your up/down values are over ...


1

Since both T1 and T2 rely on X1, X2, Y1, and Y2, you should first simulate those four random variables: X1 <- rnorm(1e4, mu1, sigma) X2 <- rnorm(1e4, mu1, sigma) Y1 <- rnorm(1e4, mu2, sigma) Y2 <- rnorm(1e4, mu2, sigma) Then you can run your code to get all simulated values of T1 and T2: T1 <- ((X1+X2)/2)*(Y1+Y2)/2) T2 <- ...


2

Thanks to Roland You can get the model string by accessing the summary attributes (have a look at str(s)) s <- summary(fit) mymod <- paste(attr(s$terms, "term.labels"), collapse=" + ") mymod [1] "x1 + x2 + x1:x2" However, you can get the data by passing the model fit to model.matrix model.matrix(fit) There will be a bit of extra work if you have ...


0

This is definitely not related to programming. The null hypothesis (denoted by H0) states that there will not be any observed effect for your experiment. So it can be stated as: The sentiment of a tweet (positive, neural or negative) is independent of the appearance of the word "apple" in the tweet. Or: The appearance of the word "apple" does not ...


0

The quantile() function will do much of what you probably want, but since the question was ambiguous, I will provide an alternate answer that does something slightly different from quantile(). ecdf(infert$age)(infert$age) will generate a vector of the same length as infert$age giving the proportion of infert$age that is below each observation. You can ...


0

matplotlib's PCA class doesn't include the Hotelling T2 calculation, but it can be done with just a couple lines of code. The following code includes a function to compute the T2 values for each point. The __main__ script applies PCA to the same example as used in Matlab's pca documentation, so you can verify that the function generates the same values as ...


1

Please read the documentation carefully. help(arima) clearly tells you that init relates to the initial values of parameters: init optional numeric vector of initial parameter values. Missing values will be filled in, by zeroes except for regression coefficients. Values already specified in fixed will be ignored. Similarly, fixed also relates ...


2

maybe create your own fake_histogram table(s) and then fill in your fake values - then UNION these to the proper ones. then you don't have to try to fool the system


2

As I stated in the comments; generate random number with RAND from 0 to 1, compare with the probability. If it is bigger then it is 0, else 1. =IF(RAND()>=A1,0,1)


2

The Problem There are many reasons why the implementation of a random forest in two different programming languages (e.g., MATLAB and Python) will yield different results. First of all, note that results of two random forests trained on the same data will never be identical by design: random forests often choose features at each split randomly and use ...


0

This should help you get started: from bs4 import BeautifulSoup import nltk from urllib import urlopen import urllib import re url = 'http://www.nfl.com/player/tombrady/2504211/careerstats' html = urlopen(url).read() soup = BeautifulSoup(html) table = soup.find("table", { "summary" : "Career Stats In Rushing For Tom Brady" }) for row in ...


0

I think this is more along the lines of what you are looking for. You can't filter the year like you were trying to do, you have to have an if statement and filter it out yourself. from bs4 import BeautifulSoup from urllib import urlopen url = 'http://www.nfl.com/player/tombrady/2504211/careerstats' html = urlopen(url).read() soup = BeautifulSoup(html) ...


5

Tabulating and collapsing Your example vector is vec <- letters[c(1,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,6)] To get a tabulation, use tab <- table(vec) To collapse infrequent items (say, with counts below two), use res <- c(tab[tab>=2],other=sum(tab[tab<2])) # b c other # 3 2 4 Displaying in two columns resdf <- data.frame(count=res) # ...


2

While stats.chisqprob() and 1-stats.chi2.cdf() appear comparable for small chi-square values, for large chi-square values the former is preferable. The latter cannot provide a p-value smaller than machine epsilon,and will give very inaccurate answers close to machine epsilon. As shown by others, comparable values result for small chi-squared values with the ...


1

In the mstats module of scipy.stats, "missing values" are handled using a masked array. nan does not indicate a missing value. The following shows how you can convert your array y (which uses nan for missing values) into a masked array my: In [48]: x = np.arange(12) In [49]: y = np.array([28.9, 26.2, 27.2, 26.5, 28.4, 25.3, 26.1, 24.8, 27.7, np.nan, ...


0

y is your target (what you want to predict) and you can get it this way: from sklearn import linear_model clf = linear_model.SGDRegressor() clf.fit(x_to_train, y_to_train) # clf is a trained model y_predicted = clf.predict(X_to_predict)


0

Here's one way to calculate confidence internal First get the correlation value (pearson's) In [85]: from scipy import stats In [86]: corr = stats.pearsonr(df['col1'], df['col2']) In [87]: corr Out[87]: (0.551178607008175, 0.0) Use the Fisher transformation to get z In [88]: z = np.arctanh(corr[0]) In [89]: z Out[89]: 0.62007264620685021 And, the ...


0

In machine learning, y represents the label or target of your data. That is, the correct answers for your training data (X). If you want to learn some values corresponding to years, then those years will be your training data (X) and the correct values associated to them will be your targets (y). You can notice that this fits the sizes you mentioned in ...


1

I just found this wikipedia page discussing data of equal significance vs weighted data. The correct way to calculate the biased weighted estimator of variance is , though this on-the-fly implementation is more efficient computationally as it does not require calculating the weighted average before looping over the sum on the weighted differences squared ...


0

I've been researching this issue in order to clean up our search tracking as well. It's difficult to find good documentation on how to track searches in a custom implementation. The closest thing I've found to tracking auto searching is Google's Adwords definition for when an ad impression is registered during Google Instant searches (where results are ...


0

None of the answers here mentions "solar storms". Although "cosmic rays" by definition (at least according to wikipedia) comes from outer space, it's well-known that our sun can cause havoc with computer systems. Some 10 years ago I was sitting right next to another guy, we were sitting with each our laptops, it was in a period with quite "stormy" solar ...


0

I have found a solution that might actually work on a Windows OS: http://gallery.rcpp.org/articles/rcpp-python/ The article describes a setup for Ubuntu, where Rcpp is used as an intermediate layer between R and Python. Although I have not tried that yet, I currently see no reason why this solution should not work on Windows as well.



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