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as he said WITHOUT PHP!! (only textfiles) i would prefer using jsonp with a callback function and a webservice like ip-api.com or ipinfo.io function fire() { var url = "http://ipinfo.io/json?callback=func"; var script = document.createElement('script'); script.src = url; script.async = true; ...


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You're not adding a constant as the documentation suggests, so it's trying to fit the whole thing as y = m x. You wind up with an m which is roughly 0.5 because it's doing the best it can, given that you have to be 0 at 0, etc. The following code (note the change in import as well) import statsmodels.api as sm import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot ...


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The periodogram and the autocorrelation function are two common sources of information used to analyse and model time series. You can use this information to compare the series. In the periodogram you can detect the frequencies at which the estimated spectral density is the highest. This will tell you which series are dominated by cycles of the same ...


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You might also consider using clistats. It is a highly configurable command line interface tool to compute statistics for a stream of delimited input numbers. I/O options Input data can be from a file, standard input, or a pipe Output can be written to a file, standard output, or a pipe Output uses headers that start with "#" to enable piping to gnuplot ...


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Your problem is that the line result = op.minimize(nll, [mupop, sigpop], args=(datapoints)) should be result = op.minimize(nll, [mupop, sigpop], args=(datapoints,)) minimize takes a tuple as args, and if you don't include the comma, it does not interpret the arguments correctly.


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I could not get scrapy to dump the stats, even with 'LOG_ENABLED' and 'DUMP_STATS' set to true. However, I found a workaround by dumping the stats manually by adding this line of code at the end of my reactor simulation: log.msg("Dumping Scrapy stats:\n" + pprint.pformat(crawler.stats.get_stats()))


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There is no single best approach to this problem. But outlined below is an approach which will work. The generalized non-parametric approach: Go through the algorithm for creating 'Constrained cubic splines' These are splines with a 'no overshoot/undershoot guarantee' with a very small sacrifice of smoothness You do not need to create the full splines, ...


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UPDATE STATISTICS helps the query optimizer make the best decisions on how to query your data. So yes, you definitely can get remarkable improvements when your Stats are up to date. reindex will help with fragmentation so that's treating a different problem


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The inverse link function is just f(x) = 1/x. If you create a family object with the command fam <- quasi(link = "inverse") the link function is set to the inverse function: fam$linkfun # function (mu) # 1/mu # <environment: namespace:stats> By default, the link function for quasi is "identity", i.e., f(x) = x. The details of quasi can be ...


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Define a new column, zGroup to group by. (The data in this example is a little different than yours) #create some data dt<-data.table(x=rep(c(1,2),each=4), y=rep(c(1,2),each=2,times=2), z=rep(c(1,2,3,4),times=2),t=1:8) #add a zGroup column dt[0<z & z<=2, zGroup:=1] dt[2<z & z<=3, zGroup:=2] dt[3<z ...


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http://techslides.com/50-javascript-charting-and-graphics-libraries/ Here's an article listing 50 different javascript libraries that support plotting. Hope you find what you're looking for.


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The RRD data type COUNTER will convert the input data into a rate, by taking the difference between this sample and the last sample, and dividing by the time interval (note that data normalisation also takes place and this is dependent on the Interval setting of the RRD) Thus, updating with a constantly increasing count will result in a rate-of-change value ...


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MAP simply returns a posterior mode, while the NormalApproximation uses a quadratic Taylor series approximation to the posterior, and so can return both the expected value and the covariance matrix. Of course, it uses a normal distribution to approximate the posterior, which may not be appropriate.


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Tuning is an adaptive procedure for optimizing the variance of the proposal distribution with the Metropolis sampler. You definitely want to tune. I don't change my tuning interval at all, but there are scenarios where it might help, I suppose.


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I don't think there's going to be an easy way to do this without stripping the initial and terminal quotation marks first. If you have sed on your system (Unix [Linux/MacOS] or Windows+Cygwin?) then read.csv(pipe("sed -e 's/^\"//' -e 's/\"$//' qtest.csv")) should work. Otherwise read.csv(text=gsub("(^\"|\"$)","",readLines("qtest.csv"))) is a little ...


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The documentation of http://idlastro.gsfc.nasa.gov/ftp/pro/robust/robust_sigma.pro states: ; OPTIONAL OUPTUT KEYWORD: ; GOODVEC = Vector of non-trimmed indices of the input vector So one calls robust_sigma with an extra parameter that keeps track of the "good indices" in the data, those used to compute the robust_sigma, as opposed to those ignored ...


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The safest platform for collecting confidential survey data is Confirmit. There is a learning curve involved here- you will be coding in VisualSQL, which is only used in Confirmit. The survey responses will export to csv files, where you can analyze your results in R. If you are collecting any confidential data, or data where respondents need unique access ...


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I understood your problem as: You have two sequences of points in a 2D plane. The true curves can be approximated by straight lines between consecutive points of the sequences. You want to know how often and where the two curves intersect (not only come into contact but really cross each other) (polygon intersection). A potential solution is: You look ...


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you can try this instead [m,n] = size(X); estimated_mean = sum(X)/m; tmp=zeros(m,n); for i=1:n tmp(:,i)= ((X(:,i) - estimated_mean(i))); end covar = (tmp.'*tmp)/m;


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I think you want tmp2 = tmp1'*tmp1; instead of tmp2 = tmp1' That change makes covar pretty close for me: covar = 1.9042 0.9534 0.9534 3.0195 The clue was the dimensions of covar for you code, should have been 2-by-2 but yours was 2-by-1


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Also, if you're interested in getting the values of the PMF, or discrete PDF, then, given x some RV with some distribution, my_pmf = hist(x)/sum(x); So try, doc hist


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The Statistics toolbox includes many probability distributions for you to choose from, both parametric and non-parametric distributions. For each it provides functions for PDF, CDF, fitting, random number generation, etc.. I suggest you start with the "Distribution Fitting app": dfittool. EDIT: In addition, MuPAD has support for a number of ...


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Adding to the OP's solution (e.g.: that the best option was fortran code, and nothing else identified came close), one way to get to a pure java library is with the the f2j compiler (fortran to java) http://icl.cs.utk.edu/f2j I've found the code it generates it be quite workable (e.g. such as this minpack library: ...


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You can do that by joining the tables as: SELECT i.NAME,i.COL0,i.COL1, (MAX(i.COL0) * MAX(CASE WHEN e.name = 'COL0' THEN estimate end) + MAX(i.COL1) * MAX(CASE WHEN e.name = 'COL1' THEN estimate end)) AS SCORE FROM INITIAL i CROSS JOIN ESTIMATES E GROUP BY i.NAME,i.COL0,i.COL1 ORDER BY NAME; Please refer this SQLFiddle Link as reference


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i am assuming you are "spawning" as fork execv combination. all child processes can be monitored using "wait" or "waitpid" with -1. make a thread block on wait/waitpid, then processing the "status" you can find out. see the man page for wait/waipid. WIFEXITED, WIFSIGNALED and other tell you exactly what happened


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When the p-value is less than a predetermined significance level (default is 5% or 0.05), it means that the null hypotheses is rejected (which in your case means that the sample did not come from a Weibull distribution). The chi2gof function first output variable h denotes the test result, where h=1 means that the test rejects the null hypothesis at the ...


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You could use a spline interpolation for the difference function g(x) = y1(x) - y(2). Finding the minimum of the square g(x)**2 would be a contact or crossing point. Looking at the first and second derivative you could decide if it is a contact point( g(x) has minimum, g'(x)==0, g''(x) != 0) or a crossing point (g(x) is a stationary point, g'(x)==0, ...


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For people without the Bioinformatics Toolbox, the FDR (False Discovery Rate) method is also very nicely described here, it also provides a link with an fdr script.


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I have encountered the same problem today. After half an hour of googling, I can't find any code in numpy/scipy library can help me do this. So I wrote my own version of corrcoef import numpy as np from scipy.stats import pearsonr, betai def corrcoef(matrix): r = np.corrcoef(matrix) rf = r[np.triu_indices(r.shape[0], 1)] df = matrix.shape[1] ...


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Well Strictly not a programming question, but since this question is unanswered in others stackexchange sites, i'll tell the approach i would take. I would say there are other benchmarks to check your approaches on similar tasks. You can check how your method performs on those benchmarks and analyze the results. Some methods may capture similarity more ...


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The lines are the median (solid line) and the interquartile range (dotted lines). The histograms just illustrate the frequencies of the sample values.


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In my experience, Mysql as of 5.5.x tends not to use indexes on dependent selects, whether a subquery or join. This can have a very significant impact on performance where the dependent select criteria change on every row. Moving average is an example of a query which falls into this category. Execution time may increase with the square of the rows. To ...


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I've written a function here to parse ldap output into a dataframe, and I used the examples provided as a reference for getting everything going. I hope it helps someone! library(RCurl) library(gtools) parseldap<-function(url, userpwd=NULL) { ldapraw<-getURL(url, userpwd=userpwd) # seperate by two new lines ldapraw<-gsub("(DN: .*?)\n", ...


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perhaps you can use the fGarchpackage: library(fGarch) y1 <- myData # store your series of returns in y # parameter estimates g = garchFit(~garch(1,1), y1, cond.dist= "norm", include.mean=FALSE, trace=FALSE) omega = g@fit$matcoef[1,1] alpha = g@fit$matcoef[2,1] beta = g@fit$matcoef[3,1] sigma2 = omega + alpha * y1[100]^2 + beta*g@h.t[100] # compute ...


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After thinking and playing around for a long time, I figured this out on my own. The Measure-Object expects an object from the pipeline. So, I wrote this way to get the result I wanted: $collection = @() $data | Group-Object Tag | ForEach-Object { $datarow = New-Object PSObject -Property @{ Tag = $_.Name } $stat = $_.Group | Measure-Object ...


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The idea is the same as a min-stack or max-stack, just that now we have to keep track of the count of elements in the stack so we can decide if a newly-pushed element changed the mode. (You can generalize this to any operation where you can provide a (possibly stateful) function (currentValue, beingPushed) -> nextValue and guarantee that popping returns ...


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It seems like the data range on which you carry out your predictions is restricted to 4 to 20 years, given that your code reads pred.frame <- data.frame(age = 4:20) Try it again with pred.frame <- data.frame(age = 4:40)


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Sort the records by income, low to high. Then compute the mean of all records 1 - N. Find N where mean = 150. data test; do id = 1 to 1000; income = 100 + round(ranuni(1)*100,1); output; end; run; proc sort data=test; by income; run; data want(where=(ave<=150)); set test; retain sum 0; sum = sum + income; ave = sum / _n_; drop sum; run; You want ...


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I will just go ahead and point out a couple of things that you may find interesting. The parameters of your model are not identifiable. There is a closed-form density that you can use to write down a likelihood. I used Mathematica to compute it in one minute and avoid some tedious computations. You can see the result below as a function of z (a realization ...


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A greedy algorithm might do the job well-enough, depending on the structure of the data. This is definitely not guaranteed to be optimal, but it can be implemented relatively fast. The idea is: Calculate the average of all the records If the average is $150 then stop Remove the largest/smallest value to increase or decrease the average, as appropriate If ...


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First, let's see if I can reproduce your example. Aside note: the next time, if you print the output from dput as done below and show the code that you were using, it will be easier for other people to reproduce what you are getting. So these are your data (a monthly time series): dput(x) structure(c(64, 63, 77, 118, 174, 229, 262, 242, 185, 165, 82, ...


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This is a bit old question, but a very important one: that's why i decided to give my two cents about it. I, for sure, prefer to use Javascript in my sites, so that i'm able to present the user a more friendly (and visually nice) interface. But this is just an opinion. Should i think about the problem from a more general point of view, i find the need to ...


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The problem you have stated is to sample from a mixture distribution. A mixture distribution is just a number of component distributions, each with a weight, such that the weights are nonnegative and sum to 1. Your mixture has 3 components. Each is a Gaussian distribution with the mean and sd you gave. It is reasonable to assume the mixing weights are the ...


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The most consice way of doing it might be the buildin method .corr in pandas, to get r: In [79]: import pandas as pd m=np.random.random((6,6)) df=pd.DataFrame(m) print df.corr() 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 1.000000 -0.282780 0.455210 -0.377936 -0.850840 0.190545 1 -0.282780 1.000000 -0.747979 -0.461637 0.270770 ...


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yourData <- c(1,1,1,1,1,1,1,5,5,15000) adapting from here: h = hist(yourData,breaks = c(1,3,6,20000)) plot(h$counts,log="x",type='h',lwd=3,lend=2)


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You can use cut, rather than trying to manipulate hist directly : myData <- c(1,1,1,1,1,1,1,5,5,15000) data <- data.frame(myData) data <- transform(data, groupdata = cut(myData, breaks=c(1,3,6,20000), right=TRUE,include.lowest = TRUE)) library(ggplot2) qplot(x = ...


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wkhtmltopdf is now at wkhtmltopdf.org (with sourcecode at github.com/wkhtmltopdf/wkhtmltopdf )


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Assuming estimates table will always result in one row when pivoting using case... SELECT i.name, i.col0, i.col1, (pest.mcol0*i.col0+pest.mcol1*i.col1) as score FROM Initial CROSS JOIN (select max(case name when 'COL0' then estimate end) as mcol0, max(case name when 'Col1' then estimate end) as mcol1 FROM estimates) Pest -- pivot Estimate


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You can do this by joining the tables and then using conditional aggregation: select i.name, max(i.col0) * max(case when e.name = 'col0' then estimate end) as col0, max(i.col1) * max(case when e.name = 'col1' then estimate end) as col1, (max(i.col0) * max(case when e.name = 'col0' then estimate end) + max(i.col1) * max(case when ...


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pandas timeseries is prefect for this application. You can merge series of different sample frequency and pandas will align them perfectly. Then you can downsample the data and preform regression, i.e., with statsmodels. An mock-up example: In [288]: idx1=pd.date_range('2001/01/01', periods=10, freq='D') idx2=pd.date_range('2001/01/01', periods=500, ...



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