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I utilized the below function to obtain the answer: > with(df, max(abs(Data-Expected))) Credit to Josh O'Brien.


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If all you need is to determine if the machine is in sync or not, you can use ntpstat. SYNOPSIS ntpstat DESCRIPTION ntpstat will report the synchronisation state of the NTP daemon running on the local machine. If the local system is found to be synchronised to a reference time source, ntpstat will report the approximate time accuracy. ...


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There may be no pearspdf function in Matlab, because the seven distribution types of the Pearson distribution mostly correspond to or are based on extant functions for other distributions: Type 0: Normal distribution, normpdf Type I: Beta distribution, betapdf Type II: Student's t-distribution, tpdf Type III: Gamma distribution, gampdf Type IV: Not related ...


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As the comments note, this is a consequence (I'm not sure I'd call it an "artifact") of the assumptions underlying gaussian KDE. As has been mentioned, this is somewhat unavoidable, and if your data don't meet those assumptions, you might be better off just using a boxplot, which shows only points that exist in the actual data. However, in your response you ...


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Hey thanks for pointing me at the right types to build a decent histogram in the first place. I would say take another crack at the overlay code by stepping through the bins instead of stepping through the values.


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You could use fitlm(X,y) function where X is all your 16 terms from u^0*a^0 to u^3*a^3 and y is your MOE of the equation. Then the output will be the coefficients, i.e., L00 to L33, you want.


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You can use the function ecdf: [f,x] = ecdf(y); plot(x,f);


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To get rid of some of that extra space at the top, you can use: par(mar=c(5,4,0,2)) before you create the plot. The crucial one is the third value. The horizontal line is hardcoded. You could just consider drawing a white line on top of it that will hide it (yes, a bit hackish ...). An example: library(metafor) dat <- escalc(measure="RR", ai=tpos, ...


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If I understand well the MATLAB documentation and the coefficient of determination definition, I think the following code should do the job: optimal_weights = w(:,FitInfo.IndexMinMSE); SStot = var(y)*length(y); predicted_values = X*optimal_weights; SSres = sum( (y(:)-predicted_values(:)).^2 ); R2 = 1 - SSres/SStot; Note SStot could be computed with ...


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Use source instead of source with echo in R Studio.


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I have found some information on this topic. Please, refer to the article by following link:http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_Display.asp


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Thanks goes for Michael OShea for his answer , but in case you have Oracle RAC multiple instances , then you will need this ... SELECT b.TABLESPACE , b.segfile# , b.segblk# , ROUND ( ( ( b.blocks * p.VALUE ) / 1024 / 1024 ), 2 ) size_mb , a.inst_ID , a.SID , a.serial# , a.username , a.osuser ...


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While part of the question is more statistics based, the bit about how to do it in Python seems at home here. I see that you've since decided to do this in R from looking at your question on Cross Validated, but in case you decide to move back to Python, or for the benefit of anyone else finding this question: I think you were in the right area looking at ...


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You can use the standard definition of skewness. In other words, you can use: You compute the mean of your data and you use the above equation to calculate skewness. Positive and negative skewness are like so: Source: Wikipedia As such, the larger the value, the more positively skewed it is. The more negative the value, the more negatively skewed it ...


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In order to check for a string you must use stringcolumn(5) instead of $5 (a shortcut for column(5), which gives the numerical value of the column). string comparison is done with eq. When plotting with histogram, gnuplot itself uses integer x-positions. Probably you want to use with boxes. You cannot just use normal subtraction for two different time ...


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SampleCache acts as a decorator object. Basically you create an instance of SampledCache and pass a Cache instance as a backing cache. The backing Cache is the cache for which you need stats, in your case the cache instance. Something like SampledCache sampledCache = new SampledCache(cache); You can call methods on sampledCache to get desired stats. ...


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If you want to split by values in one of the columns, you can use lapply. For instance, to split ChickWeight into a separate dataset for each chick: data(ChickWeight) lapply(unique(ChickWeight$Chick), function(x) ChickWeight[ChickWeight$Chick == x,])


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This might be very helpful in attaining the desired visitor related statistics: http://packalyst.com/packages/package/weboap/visitor


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This is actually fairly straightforward to reconstruct, if you note that the values in index.treated are repeated M number of times, for those treated cases for which it is possible to find matches within the caliper distance. So, in your case, the the first two elements of index.control are the index numbers of the cases which are mapped to the first two ...


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Thank you all for your answers. I wasn't expecting such great input. I find the answers from beaker and andrew easier to understand, but Luis Mendo's code runs around twice as fast on my machine. So I'll use that for the moment.


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You can specify the model with random terms and how to divide to get the F ratios by using the Error term in the formula (I changed Machine and Operator to factors in the data): > summary(aov(Measure~Machine + Error(interaction(Machine,Operator)),data=mydat)) Error: interaction(Machine, Operator) Df Sum Sq Mean Sq F value Pr(>F) ...


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The easiest way is with a for loop as in: p <- numeric(0) for(i in seq(nrow(df1))) pvalues[i] <- t.test(df1[i],df2[i])$p.value you should be warned that taking rows out of a data.frame often causes some confusing type coercion, so I would convert the data.frames to a matrix first and test that the matrix is numeric as in mx1 <- ...


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The summary of the aov function: > summary(aov(Measure~factor(Machine)/factor(Operator),data=mydata)) Df Sum Sq Mean Sq F value Pr(>F) factor(Machine) 4 0.0003033 7.583e-05 8.766 3.52e-05 *** factor(Machine):factor(Operator) 5 0.0000186 3.720e-06 0.430 0.825 Residuals ...


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This can be done using bsxfun twice: Compute rotated row indices by subtracting r with bsxfun and using mod. As usual, mod needs indices starting at 0, not 1. The rotated row indices are left as 0-based, because that's more convenient for step 2. Get a linear index from columns and rotated rows, again using bsxfun. This linear index applied to x gives y: ...


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See the fifer package for function chisq.post.hoc()


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I have another method for finding the last element in a vector. Say the vector is a. > a<-c(1:100,555) > end(a) #Gives indices of last and first positions [1] 101 1 > a[end(a)[1]] #Gives last element in a vector [1] 555 There you go!


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It depends a lot on what level of development you plan on doing. The vast majority of software development can get by with a course on discrete mathematics (example books: Discrete Mathematics or Outline of Discrete Mathematics). For a course like data structures and algorithms its important to have an understanding of mathematical proof's as they are used ...


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This can be done using a simple for loop to iterate over each row, and a function called 'circshift' from matlab. I created a function the goes through each row and applies the appropriate shift to it. There may be more efficient ways to implement this, but this way works with your examples. I created a function function rotated_arr = ...


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circshift is pretty close to what you're looking for except that 1) it works on columns rather than rows, and 2) it shifts the entire matrix by the same offset. The first one is easy to fix, we just transpose. For the second one I haven't been able to find a vectorized approach, but in the meantime, here's a version with a for loop: x = [1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 ...


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It seems to me like you are willing to do a linear regression : log Y = b log A + b log (N+1-X) - a log X In this context I would create say YY = log Y, X1 = log(N+1-X) and X2 = log X and go with lm(YY ~ X1 + X2)


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You could use RcppRoll for very quick moving averages written in C++. Just call the roll_mean function. Docs can be found here. Otherwisem, this (slower) for loop should do the trick. ma <- function(arr, n=15){ res = arr for(i in n:length(arr)){ res[i] = mean(arr[(i-n):i]) } res }


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Using this kronecker product identity it becomes a classic linear regression problem. But even without that, it is just the transpose of a linear regression setup. import numpy as np m, n = 3, 4 N = 100 # num samples rng = np.random.RandomState(42) W = rng.randn(m, n) X = rng.randn(n, N) Z_clean = W.dot(X) Z = Z_clean + rng.randn(*Z_clean.shape) * .001 ...


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I think that there is not a good R tool to read a file in a random way (maybe it can be an extension read.table or fread(data.table package)) . Using perl you can easily do this task. For example , to read 1% of your file in a random way, you can do this : xx= system(paste("perl -ne 'print if (rand() < .01)'",big_file),intern=TRUE) Here I am calling ...


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The code above does not actually work. Notice that sse is a scalar, and then it tries to iterate through it. The following code is a modified version. Not amazingly clean, but I think it works more or less. class LinearRegression(linear_model.LinearRegression): def __init__(self,*args,**kwargs): # *args is the list of arguments that might go into ...


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As others pointed out, the data is stored in a RAW format. It's worth noting that the RAW value only stores the first 32 bytes of data. In the example below the results are 100% accurate up to 32 bytes. But I'm not sure if that's always the case. In this answer I used optimizer statistics but they were not 100% accurate even for a few bytes. --Create ...


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I have translated the Linear Regression Function used in the funcion Forecast in Excel, and created an SQL function that returns a,b, and the Forecast. You can see the complete teorical explanation in the excel help for FORECAST fuction. Firs of all you will need to create the table data type XYFloatType: CREATE TYPE [dbo].[XYFloatType] AS TABLE( [X] ...


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the Statistics tab shows low_value and high_value using the RAW data type. You can try in this way: select utl_raw.cast_to_number(low_value), utl_raw.cast_to_number(high_value) from cols where column_name = '<column_name>' and table_name = '<table_name>' regards Giova


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you can create the statistics and use the DBCC SHOW_STATISTICS command to see the differences between them. Here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190397.aspx you can read how this work: Query Predicate Contains Multiple Correlated Columns When a query predicate contains multiple columns that have cross-column relationships and dependencies, ...


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I don't know how this will be helpful in a linear regression but you could do something like that: df <- read.table(header=T, text="Assay Sample Dilution meanresp number 1 S 0.25 68.55 1 1 S 0.50 54.35 2 1 S 1.00 44.75 3") Using lapply: > lapply(2:nrow(df), function(x) df[(x-1):x,] ...


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I think you need to use the == operator (which tests for equality) in the argument Age == x. Also subset() returns a data.frame when it's passed a data.frame, so you need to use the $ operator to select the survival variable from the data.frame before taking the mean. fun <- function(x) mean(subset(data_with_only_males, Age == x)$Survival)


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As soon as you talk of means and standard deviations for lots of data, you should start using any of the numerical libraries. Consider using numpy, or even pandas (for readability) here. I'll be using them in this example, together with the Counter object from the collections module. Read up on both to see how they work, but I'll explain a bit throughout the ...


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Based on the description you have provided, the problem can be split into 2: Finding and excluding Statistical Outliers from the data set Sorting the resulting values in descending (or just in any) order The general solution to the first problem and example using Microsoft Excel is described at : Statistical Outliers detection in Microsoft Excel ...


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The log likelihood: minusLogLike <- function(df, data) -sum(dchisq(data, df, log=TRUE)) Notice the use of log=TRUE. A little example of estimating by MLE follows: dat <- rchisq(100,5) optim(2, minusLogLike, lower=1, upper=10, method="Brent", data=dat)


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You can easily do that if you use the boot package as follows: Example dataset: y <- rep(c(0,1),50) x1 <- runif(100) x2 <- runif(100) df <- data.frame(y,x1,x2) Run logistic regression: model.m <- glm(y~x1+x2,data=df,family=binomial) Run residual diagnostics and plot them: library(boot) model.m.diagnostics <- glm.diag(model.m) ...


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Since a couple of people have asked to see the mathematical solution, I'll give it. This is one of the Project Euler problems that can be done in a reasonable amount of time with pencil and paper. The answer is 7(1 - (60 choose 20)/(70 choose 20)) To get this write X, the count of colors present, as a sum X0+X1+X2+...+X6, where Xi is 1 if the ith color ...


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I think that it should be the following: df <- ts(cbind(gdp, life), start = 1950, freq = 1) # Symmetrical VECM fit1<- ecmSymFit(df[, 1], df[, 2], lag = 1) #Setting split=FALSE makes the co-integration symmetrical. fit2<- ecmAsyFit(df[, 1], df[, 2], lag = 1, split =FALSE, model = "linear", thresh = 0) summary(fit)


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Maybe exactly 983 books have a cedilla. Or Japanese characters. Or diphthongs. I don't think there's any way you can use statistics here that won't cause statisticians to cringe. Why don't you just offer a 0.73% discount to your fee, based on the outcome? :-) Or, offer to fix the problem, meaning that they'll have to provide the information as to why they ...


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An improvement on tokland's answer that augments the Array class and fixes an edge case (method as written blows up with array size of 4). class Array def interquartile_mean a = sort l = size quart = (l.to_f / 4).floor t = a[quart..-(quart + 1)] t.inject{ |s, e| s + e }.to_f / t.size end end


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It appears that R's qt may use a completely different algorithm than Matlab's tinv. I think that you and others should report this deficiency to The MathWorks by filing a service request. By the way, in R2014b, -Inf is returned instead of NaN for small values (about eps/8 and less) of the first argument, p. This is more sensible, but I think they should do ...


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scikit-learn's LinearRegression doesn't calculate this information but you can easily extend the class to do it: from sklearn import linear_model from scipy import stats import numpy as np class LinearRegression(linear_model.LinearRegression): """ LinearRegression class after sklearn's, but calculate t-statistics and p-values for model ...



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