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You need to make sure you specify the same range when binning the data. In that way, the corresponding indices of the bins will be consistent. I've used the lower level numpy function hist2d, extension to standard deviations can be done in the same way using scipy.stats.binned_statistic_2d, import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt #Setup random ...


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There is a possibly related problem which is thought not to have any non-obvious speed-ups. This is the problem of finding a pair of orthogonal boolean vectors in a list of n. Under some conditions the cost may be irreducibly O(n^2) - see e.g. slide 4 of http://theory.stanford.edu/~virgi/conclusions-amir.pdf. If it were lower we could do SAT significantly ...


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One simple solution is to precompute all the angles and store them in a lookup table (an upper-triangular matrix). That would cost 30k * 30k / 2 = 450m. That would be the fastest.


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go to R console and type head(table name, the number of rows you want) e.g. head(ABC,2) will give the first two rows.


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Wouldn't z <- df[df$x > quantile(df$x, .25) - 1.5*IQR(df$x) & df$x < quantile(df$x, .75) + 1.5*IQR(df$x)] accomplish this task quite easily?


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Could it be the Bonferroni adjustment that is being applied by CTABLES potentially?


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Doug's answer here is incorrect. Package Kendall can be used to calculate Tau b. The Kendall package function Kendall (and it would also seem cor(x,y,method="kendall")) calculate ties using the formula for Tau-b. However, for vectors with ties, the Kendall package has the more correct p-value. See page 4 of the documentation for Kendall, from ...


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I guess you want to sample only with the non-NA values. In that case, !is.na can be useful to remove the NA values and then we sample on the remaining values. The output will be a list ('lst') as the number of elements differ (4 and 5) for each row after the sample. lst <- apply(df, 1, function(x) sample(x[!is.na(x)], replace=TRUE)) If we need to ...


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First, if i understand your question correctly, for each hour on a date, you get a random 2 digit number. You have a set of dates with corresponding random 2-digit numbers and now for a new date where you dont have the random 2-digit numbers from, you want a linear regression to predict what that 2-digit number is. However, i do not know if that is the best ...


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mlply(expand.grid(n=4:5, df1=1:2, df2=1:3), rf, ncp=0) gives you a list. which you could combine with rbind.fill as in Gavin's answer.


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So after waiting a while, I ended up writing my own function. If anyone is in need of this, or is interested in contributing, here is my repo https://github.com/asosnovsky/Matlab.Multivariate.Chi.Test


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Here's one way: pars <- expand.grid(n = 4, df1 = 1:2, df2 = 1:3, ncp = 0) set.seed(12345) do.call("mapply", c(FUN = rf, as.list(pars), SIMPLIFY = TRUE)) Which gives > do.call("mapply", c(FUN = rf, as.list(pars), SIMPLIFY = TRUE)) [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [1,] 1.347567e-01 0.2530428 1.51868436 ...


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Absolutely. Search for "shilling recommender systems" in Google Scholar or elsewhere. There has been a decent amount of scholarly work identifying bad actors in recommender systems. Generally there's a focus on preventing robot actions (which doesn't seem to be your concern) as well as finding humans who rate differently than the norm (i.e., rating ...


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I think this should work. It could easily be turned into a function. d = 5 # number of dimensions n_draws = 100 # number of draws sigma = 0.2 # standard deviation I begin by sampling random vectors that should be uniformly distributed on the unit sphere. I do this by normalizing draws from a d-dimensional multivariate normal distribution. ...


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RAE and RSE closer to 0 is a good sign...you want error to be as low as possible. See this article for more information on evaluating your model. From that page: The term "error" here represents the difference between the predicted value and the true value. The absolute value or the square of this difference are usually computed to capture the total ...


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You can find a definition in the context of information retrieval and a nice graph in the IR book.


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You could sample the column indices all at once and then use matrix subsetting to avoid having to use apply: ## Determine how many indices are required (nrow x (ncol - 1)) nsamp <- prod(dim(df1[, -1])) ## Sample from the number of desired columns, here 5 = ncol(df1[, -1]) mySamp <- sample.int(5, nsamp, replace = TRUE) ## Create a matrix of row and ...


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You could use apply with replace=TRUE for the sample t(apply(df1[,-1], 1, sample, replace=TRUE))


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gtools package: library(gtools) df.temp[mixedorder(df.temp$s.names), ] Another base alternative: n <- df.temp$s.names[order(as.numeric((gsub("S", "", df.temp$s.names))))] df.temp[match(n, df.temp$s.names), ] Output: s.names x1 x2 11 S1 1.2285667 1.48669700 10 S2 0.9438498 0.01775496 1 S3 1.3671933 ...


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Same approach as @Molx, this time with a different function: df.temp[order(as.numeric(substr(df.temp$s.names,2,3))),] With your data should give you what you want. The problem is you're trying to sort strings, and they will do in alphabetical (not numerical) order.


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Your problem is caused because you're trying to sort by a string column as if it was a numeric column. If all the elements begin with S, you can just make them numeric: > x <- paste0("S", 1:20) > x [1] "S1" "S2" "S3" "S4" "S5" "S6" "S7" "S8" "S9" "S10" "S11" "S12" "S13" "S14" "S15" "S16" "S17" "S18" [19] "S19" "S20" > sort(x) [1] "S1" ...


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You need to add line of code to do the sampling, ie. Boot.fun <- function(data) { data <- sample(data, replace=T) m1 <- ... since you didn't supply a function to the argument rand.gen to generate random values. This is discussed in the documentation for ?boot. If sim = "parametric" and you don't supply a generating ...


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Do you mean ## include Normal (df -> Inf) values at head of the table, as in ## linked example DegreeFreedom <- c(Inf,DegreeFreedom) m <- t(outer(Prob,DegreeFreedom, qt,lower.tail=FALSE)) dimnames(m) <- list(df=DegreeFreedom,alpha=Prob) Check: m["1","0.1"] ## 3.077684 ?


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Just wanted to add some simplifications and benchmarking. Since you have a fair amount of data, speed may be a concern. The apply() approaches can be simplified for some speed-up. Since your data seems to be all numeric, working with a matrix will be much faster than a data.frame. df = data.frame(x1=rnorm(100),x2=rnorm(100),x3=rnorm(100)) mat = ...


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We can use substr to get the 'year' part from 'Date' column, use that in subset to extract the rows that have '2010' as year, select the 'Var1' column, and get the sum sum(subset(df1, substr(Date,5,8)==2010, select=Var1)) Or a dplyr/lubridate option would be using filter and summarise to get similar result. library(lubridate) library(dplyr) df1 ...


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Building on the previous answer, instead using length to count the number of obs greater than 2.05 in each column and then barplot to display the number by column. df<- data.frame(matrix(rnorm(10000)+1,ncol=100,nrow=100)) nc1<-apply(df,2,function(x) length(which(x>2.05))) a = table(nc1) ...


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Here is an example of what you could do: df<-data.frame(x1=rnorm(100),x2=rnorm(100),x3=rnorm(100)) nc1<-apply(df,2,function(x)sum(x>1)) hist(nc1)


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Instead System.out.print(numberValues+" ");//displays address write System.out.print(numberValues[i]+" ");//displays value here


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First, be sure you are importing chisquare from scipy.stats. Numpy has the function numpy.random.chisquare, but that does not do a statistical test. It generates samples from a chi-square probability distribution. So be sure you use: from scipy.stats import chisquare There is a second problem. As slices of the two-dimensional array returned by loadtxt, ...


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To do a paired T test, you need to supply the paired = TRUE parameter. The t.test function isn't vectorised, but it's quite simple to do t tests a whole matrix at a time. Here's three methods (including using apply): library("genefilter") library("matrixStats") library("microbenchmark") dd <- DataSample[, 1:12] - DataSample[, 13:24] ...


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I converted to a data.table, and the answer I got was 45: DataSample.dt <- as.data.table(DataSample) sum(sapply(seq_len(nrow(DataSample.dt)), function(x) t.test(DataSample.dt[x, paste0('Trial', 1:12), with=F], DataSample.dt[x, paste0('Control', 13:24), with=F], var.equal=T)$p.value) < 0.05)


0

This vignette is what you are looking for, if the above answer isn't enough. It's about and hand-holdy as you can get with this sort of thing.


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One option is to loop over the data set calculating the t test for each row, but it is not as elegant. set.seed(2112) DataSample <- matrix(rnorm(24000),nrow=1000) colnames(DataSample) <- c(paste("Trial",1:12,sep=""),paste("Control",13:24,sep="")) # initialize vector of stored p-values pvalue <- rep(0,nrow(DataSample)) for (i in ...


1

If tt is your series then fortify.zoo will convert it: library(zoo) DF <- fortify.zoo(tt) giving: > head(DF) Index tt 1 2000.75 1.0227039 2 2001.00 -5.0683144 3 2001.25 0.6657713 4 2001.50 3.3161374 5 2001.75 -2.1586704 6 2002.00 -0.7833623 If you wish you could transform the Index to yearqtr class: DF <- transform(DF, Index = ...


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library(zoo) for (i in seq_along(res)) { current <- res[[i]] df <- data.frame(yq = yearqtr(index(current)), val = coredata(current)) path <- paste0("C:/Users/Desktop/Output/", names(res)[i], ".csv") write.table(df, file = path, row.names=FALSE, na="", sep = ";", dec = ",") } What was ...


1

You could do something funky with UNION ALL but I'd probably keep the three queries separate. You'll probably want some application code to render the results into a table or graph of some sorts anyway and I'd take the overhead of three calls. I'd run the queries as follows: SELECT COUNT(order.id), SUM(order.total_amount) FROM `order` ...


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You can use the text function to put the equations on the plots. text(x, y, "S1 <- lm(y ~ z, data=x)", cex = .8) the x and y are the coordinates on the plot where you would like the equation put the equation in quotes data is your data frame cex controls the font size for more info & options on text use ?text


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In base R it is something like that: df$sumval <- tapply(df$density, list(df$year, df$area, df$species), sum ) df$perce <- df$density / df$sumval but as I said in my comment it has always 1 as a result because every year has only one value.


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pseudocode assuming the customer had an account and your database is MySQL every purchase must save customerid, product id/name ,date of purchase,comment(optional) to a table (e.g. purchased table) customer has their own table that includes at least their personal info(e.g. customer table) lets say customer browses the product (viewing the website) • ...


0

The expected input to matplotlib functions are usually numpy arrays, which have the methods nparray.size. Lists do not have size methods so when list.size is called in the hist function, this causes your error. You need to convert, using nparray = np.array(list). You can do this after the loop where you build the lists with append, something like, baseprob ...


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I'm not sure what you mean by "statistical significance of a correlation peak," so I can't comment on whether the statistics you're talking about make any sense. However it sounds like you'd like calculate the following: how many standard deviations from the mean (say 1.96 sigma) cover a given fraction (in this case, 0.95) of the normal distribution? If this ...


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The simplest solution I found for the question at hand can be found in the following post: http://trentrichardson.com/2010/04/06/compute-linear-regressions-in-javascript/ Note that in addition to the linear equation, it also returns the R2 score, which can be useful. ** EDIT ** Here is the actual code snippet: function linearRegression(y,x){ var ...


0

You need to work the Date into your WITH statement somehow. Try first adding your target months, that will be on the rows, into a named set: WITH SET [TargetSet] AS { [Id Distribution Date].[DateJ].[Month].[Jan-2015], [Id Distribution Date].[DateJ].[Month].[Feb-2015] } Then I'd add another set taking TargetSet into account: SET [NonEmptyIds] AS ...


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In a sense, the eigenvector with the largest eigenvalue is pointing in the direction of the maximum variance. The one with the second largest eigenvalue is pointing in the direction of maximum variance that is left after accounting for the first one. The eigenvector with the second largest eigenvalue will be orthogonal to the one with the largest eigenvalue. ...


1

Coin flips are independent. That is to say, past coin flips have no impact on future coin flips. Assuming a fair coin, the probability of flipping a heads is 1/2 or 50%. These odds stay the same irregardless of past flips. If you flip a coin ten times and every time it lands heads, the next flip is still has 1/2 chance of landing heads.


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No, each flip is independent of subsequent flips. You can get X heads in a row and the probability of a fair coin coming up heads the next time is still 0.50. You might want to read this: http://stats.stackexchange.com/questions/21825/probability-over-multiple-blocks-of-events


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I believe you're looking for the residuals. A residual is defined as e = y - ŷ You can get them on R by doing M <- lm(a~b) M$residuals Although, geometrically speaking, this would be a vertical distance to the line, orthogonal to the x axis, and not a distance from the observed point to the closest point on the line, which would be orthogonal to the ...


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Have you tried the wide option? eststo clear sysuse auto, clear eststo: quietly regress price weight mpg eststo: quietly regress price weight mpg foreign // original esttab, ar2 // wide option esttab, ar2 wide I guess much of it boils down to what you mean by "clumsy to reuse".


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Not sure if I understood well your question or not. But there is no assumption about the training data in an HMM. The HMM training procedure considers every training sequence as independent with respect to the others. So, I guess that if you want to represent your different training sets by a unique HMM, you just have to consider your data set as a unique ...


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Please use the following C# code Method code internal static double QUARTILE(double[] array, int nth_quartile) { Array.Sort(array); double dblPercentage = 0; switch (nth_quartile) { case 0: dblPercentage = 0; //Smallest value in the data set break; case 1: ...



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