New answers tagged

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I ultimately ended up using bayesian averaging, which was recommended in this post. The technique is briefly described in this wikipedia article and more thoroughly described in this post by Evan miller and this post by Paul Masurel. In bayesian averaging, "prior values" are used to influence the numerator and denominator towards the expected values. ...


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Seems like you want cumulative sum of fr. You can do cumfr = [sum(fr(:i+1)) for i in range(len(fr))] Then the percentiles are percentile = [100*i/cumfr[-1] for i in cumfr]


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Here is the solution : Addition : [x1,x2] + [y1,y2] = [x1 + y1, x2 + y2] Substraction : [x1,x2] - [y1,y2] = [x1 - y2, x2 - y1] Multiplication : [x1,x2] . [y1,y2] = [min(x1y1,x1y2,x2y1,x2y2),max(x1y1,x1y2,x2y1,x2y2)] Division : [x1,x2] / [x1,x2] = [x1,x2] . (1/[y1,y2]) with 1/[y1,y2] = [1/y2,1/y1] (y1 and y2 not equal to 0) Therefore: [min1,max1]/[...


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I'll go ahead and give you the LOD expression, so that you'll have something that will work regardless of your table layout. { FIXED [salesperson], [date] : SUM([unit price] * [quantity]) / SUM([quantity]) } That will give you a table that looks like this: +------------+----------+-------------+------+-----------------+ | unit price | quantity | ...


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I think I figured it out: sum(unit price*quantity)/sum(quantity)


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You want to determine the total amount (in dollars) sold on average, per day. You can create a calculated field, like so: SUM([Quantity] * [Unit Price]) / COUNTD([Date]) Then display the data by salesperson:


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The output of K-Means algorithm depends a lot on the initial centroids that you choose. If you choose centroids that are close to one another then the clusters that you get will be skewed. Moreover if the true clusters have unbalanced number of data points then by choosing the initial centroids randomly there is a high probability that you would choose the ...


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The problem is that you are running your prediction on the overview which you are not weighting by bucket size. The plot below shows this issue, at $6000 the normal distribution(red) has a lower probability than the data (black). You can calculate the overall mean like this =SUMPRODUCT(D6:D31, F6:F31) / SUM(D6:D31) And the overall standard deviation ...


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Since the CDF is a relatively smooth function, you could use linear interpolation to approximate unknown percentages for given revenue values based on the bracketing known percentages. For your 6000 example: 6000 - 5701.57 p - 85 ----------------- = ------- => p = 82.7416 (approximately) 6890.85 - 5701.57 76 - 85 If linear interpolation is not ...


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Reason was 'pio' is not set as an environment variable. So I execute building engine as follows. /home/PredictionIO/PredictionIO-0.9.6/bin/pio build --verbose Then it works for me


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If I have some data that I know they follow Poisson distribution isn't it possible to calculate the λ of that distribution? (Is this possible or am I miss something from statistics theory?) Sure. Mean of Poisson is equal to λ, so compute mean of your data and try ti use it. Because variance is equal to λ as well, there is quick check how Poisson your data ...


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As your distribution is not in scipy.stats you can either add it to the package or try doing things "by hand". For the former have a look at the source code of the scipy.stats package - it might not be all that much work to add a new distribution! For the latter option you can use a maximum Likelihood approach. To do so define first a method giving you the ...


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Some of the features are boolean, but other features are categorical and can take on a small number of values (~5). This is an interesting question, but it is actually more than a single one: How to deal with a categorical feature in NB. How to deal with non-homogeneous features in NB (and, as I'll point out in the following, even two categorical ...


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I'd be tempted to use a probabilistic rank — the probability that an item category is from the group given the actual numbers for that category. This requires making some assumptions about the data set, including why a category may have any out-of-group items. You might take a look at the binomial test or the Mann-Whitney U test for a start. You might ...


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You have the right idea, but in order to check for the presence of a string within a cell array of strings, you need to use strcmp, ismember, or another method for comparing a string to a cell array. You probably also want to specify that you don't want to use replacement when calling datasample so you don't get the same row twice. subx = X(datasample(...


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The simplest approach I can think of would be to have a look at the correlation matrix via proc corr: data diseases; input Moya Hypothyroid Hyperthyroid Celiac; cards; 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 ...


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Your strikes is a random variable with the binomial distribution. scipy has support for sampling from this distribution more efficiently than summing a huge number of Bernouilli trials. Here's an example: from scipy.stats import binom luck = 0.3 trials = 200000000 print binom(trials, luck).rvs() Despite the large number of trials, this runs almost ...


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There are several tools for this in functional programming, like folds and list/generator comprehensions, but the most basic idea is recursion. So, for instance, for getTotal(): getTotal(sides, dice): if dice == 0: return 0 else return rand.int(sides) + getTotal(sides, dice - 1) This function, sadly, will not work for your ...


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These values are from org.apache.solr.handler.RequestHandlerBase, which is using org.apache.solr.util.stats.Timer for measuring. Timer has this constructor: public Timer(TimeUnit durationUnit, TimeUnit rateUnit, Clock clock) and this default constructor public Timer() { this(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS, TimeUnit.SECONDS, Clock.defaultClock()); } As ...


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I would suggest to consider using ansible for this purpose. Here's a simple playbook that collects some data on hosts specified in inventory file and appends it to a local file: - hosts: all remote_user: your_user tasks: - name: collect load average shell: cat /proc/loadavg register: cluster_node_la - name: write to local disk ...


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IIUC, you can use numpy.digitize df['C'] = df.groupby(['A'])['B'].transform(lambda x: np.digitize(x,bins=np.array([0,1,2]))) A B C 0 foo 0 1 1 foo 0 1 2 foo 1 2 3 bar 0 1 4 bar 0 1 5 bar 1 2


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Two big problems with your code: The result of fillNAgaps(Compr) is not assigned to a variable, so basically you do not use your function at all (the function seems wrong anyway as it would convert your data.frame into a huge vector). You create a Mudster variable (which does not exist in the columns of the data.frame train) but then in the formula of ...


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Is this what you are looking for?: bootci(1000, @(x) mean(randsample(x, 50, true)), y) By moving the resampling inside the bootfun you will get a (potentially) new 50-element sample during each bootsrap sampling (1000 times). Furthermore, by specifying y as the data argument for bootci you achieve that the 500-element (full) data is sampled.


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Note that if you use a Content Delivery Network (CDN) like Cloudflare, Akamai, etc., that Awstats will not be aware of any traffic handled by the CDN. You will have to rely on stats provided by the CDN, or on page javascript solutions like Google Analytics.


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Consider vapply(), a variant of lapply() that allows specification of the output here being atomic numeric vector (length of 1). However, first, you need to merge the tables by Date field and then create a list of Port formulas (assuming that's the needed underlying data). Below runs linear regression, lm, but adjust to actual model which might require ...


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Hopefully this accomplishes what you are looking for. data have ; input ColA $ ColB $ ColC ColD ColE $; cards; A 20150707 1 100 xxx B 20150708 0 100 xyz B 20150708 0 200 xyz B 20150709 1 150 xyz C 20150709 0 100 yyy C 20150710 1 200 yyy C 20150710 1 300 yyy D 20150710 2 100 zzz ; proc sql; create table want as select distinct ColA, ...


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The arima() function does not use the maximum likelihood method to fit the model. The exact likelihood is computed via a state-space representation of the ARIMA process, and the innovations and their variance found by a Kalman filter.


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How can do this stata sintxis for spss. foreach var of varlist pob_multi pob_multimod pob_multiex vul_car vul_ing nopob_nov espacio carencias carencias_3 ic_rezedu ic_asalud ic_ss ic_cv ic_sbv ic_ali pobex pob { tabstat `var' [w=factor] if pob_multi!=., stats(mean) save matrix define `var'_pp =(r(StatTotal)) matrix rownames `var'_pp = `var'...


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In the following, I will not use ecdf(), as it is easy to obtain empirical cumulative density function (ECDF) ourselves. First, we sort samples X in ascending order: X <- sort(X) ECDF at those samples takes function values: e_cdf <- 1:length(X) / length(X) We could then sketch ECDF by: plot(X, e_cdf, type = "s") abline(h = 0.6, lty = 3) ...


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I'm not familiar with the specific C# package, but the apache commons math package has extensive support for easily calculating different probability distributions, including the standard normal distribution function. NormalDistribution ndist=new NormalDistribution(); double result=ndist.cumulativeProbability(1.96);


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In many real-world scenarios, the cardinality of values in a dataset will be relatively small. In such cases, the problem can be efficiently solved with two MapReduce jobs: Calculate frequencies of values in your dataset (Word Count job, basically) Identity mapper + a reducer which calculates median based on < value - frequency> pairs Job 1. will ...


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# your data set.seed(96) sampleData <- data.frame( ID = 1:200, outcome = sample(1:7, 200, replace = T), scale = sample(1:7, 200, replace = T), dummy1 = sample(0:1, 200, replace = T), dummy2 = sample(0:1, 200, replace = T)) # all possible combinations newData <- data.frame(scale=rep(1:7, each=4), dummy1=rep(c(0, 0, 1, 1), 7), ...


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If you are just starting with RNA-seq analysis, you could have a look at my workflow, which I recently put into a package. It also includes DESeq2, plus a number of other useful (I think) tools. # install package from github devtools::install_github("ShirinG/exprAnalysis", build_vignettes=TRUE) browseVignettes("exprAnalysis")


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The answer is no, I'm afraid. The ranges used in COUNTIF(S)/SUMIF(S)/AVERAGEIF(S) must be either: 1) References to worksheet ranges 2) Constructions which resolve to references to worksheet ranges One example of the former: =SUMIF(A1:A10,"A",B1:B10) And two of the latter (which just happen to be identical to the above): =SUMIF(A1:INDEX(A:A,10),"A",B1:...


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Visitor tracking I would record visits directly in the database in the corresponding controller. This is the most easy and convenient way to track page views. It saves the unique visitor session ID and the current page to the database. Here is an example: class PageController extends Controller { public function index() { \DB::table('...


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On the root command line fitting a poisson distribution can be done like this: TF1* func = new TF1("mypoi","[0]*TMath::Poisson(x,[1])",0,20) func->SetParameter(0,5000) // set starting values func->SetParameter(1,2.) // set starting values ...


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Not sure this is a stack overflow answer. What you are asking is for the correlation between binary vectors. This is called the Phi coefficient which was discovered by Pearson. It approximates the Pearson correlation for small values. You might try sqrt(chisq.test(table(dat[,1],dat[,2]), correct=FALSE)$statistic/length(dat[,1])) and notice that it ...


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You would need to create YouTubeService object and can get search results for the keywords YouTubeService youtubeService = new YouTubeService(new BaseClientService.Initializer() { ApiKey = "dfhdufhdfahfujashfd", ApplicationName = this.GetType().ToString() }); var searchListRequest = youtubeService.Search.List("snippet"); searchListRequest.Q = "...


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I'm not sure exactly how you want to sample, but here's a simple example using the built-in iris data frame. Below are two ways to do it. One using Base R and the other using the dplyr package. Base R split the data frame into three separate smaller data frames, one for each Species. Randomly sample 5 rows per Species. # Sample 5 rows from each stratum ...


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You do not use the x parameter. Try the following: float sum = std::accumulate(k.begin(), k.end(), 0.0F, [&mean](float x, float y) { return x + (y - mean) * (y - mean); }); UPDATE: init value as float


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I should mention that xalglib is a package full of statistical methods allowing to do this: http://www.alglib.net/ http://www.alglib.net/hypothesistesting/variancetests.php while it is less flexible than original methods based on scipy. I should mention that correct double tailed calculation procedure can be found (in variancetests.c) as: stat = ae_minreal(...


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It is now possible to specify the whiskers endpoints in ggplot2_2.1.0. Copying from the examples in ?geom_boxplot: # It's possible to draw a boxplot with your own computations if you # use stat = "identity": y <- rnorm(100) df <- data.frame( x = 1, y0 = min(y), y25 = quantile(y, 0.25), y50 = median(y), y75 = quantile(y, 0.75), ...


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The user with which I had issued the command set global use_stat_tables='prefetably'; did not have the correct permissions. When connected as root, it worked! MariaDB [pktest]> select user(); +----------------+ | user() | +----------------+ | root@localhost | +----------------+ 1 row in set (0.01 sec) MariaDB [pktest]> set global ...


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You can generate images dynamically with PHP GD (manual link).


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thats actually a div tag with height and width and given a background image. then you can design and place your data to be shown on that div


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The answer is that the correct responses need to go before the predictions. Duh :-)


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You can try a format instead of decorate: git log --graph --oneline --format="%d %s (%an)" --numstat See more at git log "commit formatting": %an is the author name


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Exhaustive search is going to be the slowest way of doing this The fastest way to do this is mentioned in one of the comments. You should pre-specify your model based on theory/intuition/logic and come up with a set of variables that you hypothesize will be good predictors of your outcome. The difference between the 2 extremes is that exhaustive search may ...


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While this can certainly be done in base R, Hadley Wickham's tools provide a nice way to do this (split data frame by some criterion, apply a transformation on the subsets, and stick them back together - "split-apply-combine" for short). (These are untested but I think they should work ...) library(plyr) library(dplyr) ## load dplyr *second!* plyr (...


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This is not possible to formulaicly solve in the general case. If you let the number of items of A, B, and C be a, b, and c, respectively, this situation gives you the equations: a + b + c = 27 160.17*a + 162.06 * b + 140* c = 27 * 156.95 This is two equations, but you are trying to solve for three variables. If you really need to know the answers are ...



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