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You can use Segment.io Segment.io’s integrations with Mixpanel, Klaviyo, Google Analytics, and many others. reference url Google Analytics Mixpanel KISSMetrics ahoy from awesome-ruby Analytical - Gem for managing multiple analytics services in your rails app. FnordMetric - A ruby/redis framework for collecting and ...


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Do it in two steps. You already have code that finds the most frequent words, so that's good. Now build an index (a dictionary) that will tell you, for each word, which sentences contain it. So the keys in this dictionary should be words, and the value will be a list of whole sentences -- basically the opposite from how you tried to do it. You'll add each ...


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You can create a tf–idf matrix, functionality should be available in NLP libraries. It will give you a matrix; Rows corresponds documents (sentences are documents in your case). Columns corresponds words (whole words in language or corpus). Cell values are scores (how good that word represents the document) of the words for that particular ...


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MIC and R^2 are both methods for detecting correlations. MIC-R^2 is not for detecting a correlation, it is a measure of the non-linearity of the relationship in question. The higher it is, the more non-linear the relationship is. The Pearson Correlation Coefficient, let's call it R, can be thought of as a measure of how well the data fits a linear ...


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No, the resulting distribution is not going to be perfectly uniform, for most values of n. For small values, it'll be so close to uniform that you'd have a hard time detecting any difference from a uniform distribution, but as n gets larger the bias can become noticeable. To illustrate, here's some Python code (not JavaScript, sorry, but the principle is ...


2

If Math.random (or equivalent) generated a uniformly-distributed bit pattern out of those bit patterns corresponding to floating point numbers in the range [0, 1), then it would produce an extremely biased sample. There are as many representable floating point number in [0.25, 0.5) as there are in [0.5, 1.0), which is also the same number of representable ...


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I assume that your remark that "the gap between one floating point number and the next higher one increases as they grow larger" is based on the following: in IEEE-754 you have a fixed-size mantissa, which allows for uniform "random" values in the range [1,2) say, and there's an equal number of possible values in [2,4) which is twice as large a range, so we ...


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Assuming random() is returning a number between 0..1. If the result is a single precision float than thats only 23bits of entropy based on the mantissa. If the result is a double precision float than thats only 52bits of entropy based on the mantissa. So floor(random() * N) would only be uniform where N is less than 2^24 or 2^53. EDIT Here's some info on ...


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I would look for a form of data clustering, to speed up the search across each 20 word trial. The data which matters is the unique words in a sentence. 2 sentences can be considered close if the jaccard distance is small. The jaccard distance is 1 - (size of(intersection of words in sentences))/( size of( union of words in sentences)). Because the ...


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According to http://es5.github.io/x15.8.html#x15.8.2.14 the functionality of Math.random Returns a Number value with positive sign, greater than or equal to 0 but less than 1, chosen randomly or pseudo randomly with approximately uniform distribution over that range, using an implementation-dependent algorithm or strategy. This function takes no ...


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Disclaimer: You have not specified data characteristics, so my answer will assume that it is not too large(more than 1,000,000 sentences, each at most 1,000). Also Description is a bit complicated and I might have not understood the problem fully. Solution: Instead of focusing on different combinations, why don't you create a hashMap(dict in python) for ...


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This will probably get moved to Cross Validated soon ... Most forms of statistical analysis, including mixed modeling, make few assumptions about the dependent (or predictor) variables. They should in general be measured without error (there are ways to relax this assumption). If you have continuous predictors in your model, transforming them may change ...


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You should check out http://github.com/fullscreen/squid – a Ruby library to plot charts in PDF files


4

You need one of replace=TRUE or size options since there are a bunch of 0 probabilities. Otherwise, sample is trying to return the same number of elements as the length of the input, but can't do so because of a lack of positive probabilities.


1

... years later.... For completeness (because this isn't mentioned in the answers) and personal reasons (I always have pandas imported in my modules but not necessarily sklearn), this is also quite straightforward with pandas.get_dummies() import numpy as np import pandas In [1]: a = np.array(['a', 'b', 'c', 'a', 'b', 'c']) In [2]: b = ...


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For each set, compute the summation of the Levenshtein distance between itself and the other sets. The set with the smallest summation is the set which is most similar to the others. You can choose to use dynamic programming to improve the efficiency of your program.


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Following @BondedDust's example: he shows how to get prediction intervals (+/- 1.96*std_dev). In principle you could recover the set.seed(1001) dfrm <- data.frame(a=rnorm(30), drop=FALSE) dfrm$y <- 4+dfrm$a*5+0.5*rnorm(30) Fit model: mod <- lm(y ~ a, data=dfrm) Predict: pframe <- data.frame(a=seq(-2,2,by=0.1)) pred <- ...


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Looks to me that you need: predict(fit, new.df, se.fit = TRUE, interval="prediction") "Standard errors" apply to the confidence limits around the estimate of the mean, while prediction errors might easily be described as "standard deviations" around predictions. > dfrm <- data.frame(a=rnorm(30), drop=FALSE) > dfrm$y <- ...


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It is nearly 1., but with a twist in the interpretation. 2.8 is the average number of double sixes if you were to perform a series of experiments with 100 throws each. The correct answer for 2. was given by Dmitry. Please ask math-oriented questions in the math forum math.stackexchange.


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The probablity of not having double six in one throw (all but one outcome divided by all outcomes): 35/36 The probability of not having double six in N throws (35/36)**N /* where ** is raising into N-th power */ The probability of having at least one double six in N throws P(N) = 1 - (35/36)**N if N == 100 we have P(100) == 0.94022021...


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May I suggest you try the approach below. I have no mathematical proof that it produces the absolutely best "score", or indeed some other "measure of goodness", but I do believe it may help you out, unless, of course, the case requires that you actually prove and find the absolutely best. I don't speak python, but the strategy and ensuing implementation ...


0

cake <- c('choc', 'van', 'car', 'ban', 'cof') cprobs<- c(.4,.4,.1,.05,.05) sample(x = cake, size = 1,prob =cprobs) prob argument is a vector that contains probabilities of x.


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The value that you want can be computed with the isf (inverse survival function) method of the scipy.stats.chi2 distribution. This method uses broadcasting, so you can create your table with just a couple lines of code: In [61]: from scipy.stats import chi2 In [62]: p = np.array([0.995, 0.99, 0.975, 0.95, 0.90, 0.10, 0.05, 0.025, 0.01, 0.005]) Make df ...


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Based the updated information you have provided, here is some code that works: import numpy as np import pymc as pm from matplotlib import pyplot as plt N = 1000 state = np.zeros(N) data = np.zeros(shape=N) # Generate data state = pm.rbernoulli(p=0.3, size=N) data = [int(pm.rbernoulli(0.8*s or 0.4)) for s in state] # Prior on probabilities p_S = ...


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What histfit does is plotting a pdf normalized to the scale of the histogram. A scaling factor of numel(p).*mean(diff(x)) is applied to match the curve with the histogram. It scales the area under the pdf to the area the histogram covers.


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How much of a problem it is depends on the nature of your data. The bigger issue will be that you simply have a huge class imbalance (50 As for every B). If you end up getting good classification accuracy anyway, then fine - nothing to do. What to do next depends on your data and the nature of the problem and what is acceptable in a solution. There really ...


1

I assume you have somewhere an answer that seems to come with a squared factor -which I'll take as n^2, where n is the number of strings (not the number of distinct comparisons, which is n*(n-1)/2, as +flaschenpost points to ). It would be easier to give you a more precise answer if you'd exactly quote what that answer is. From what I understand of your ...


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Those things are getting easier to understand if done by hand with pen and paper for a small example. If you have the 7 Strings named a,b,c,d,e,f,g, then the simplest version would Compare a to b, a to c, ... , a to g (this are 6) Compare b to a, b to c, ... , b to g (this are 6) . . . Compare g to a, g to b, ... , g to f (this are 6) So you have 7*6 ...


2

The trick you describe is actually called Laplace smoothing (or additive, or add-by-one smoothing) and suppose to add the same summand to the other part of the fraction - nominator in your case or denominator in original case. In other words, you should add 1 to the total number of docs: log (# of docs + 1 / # of docs with term + 1) Btw, it is often ...


1

You can count how many players with larger score there are: SELECT COUNT(*) FROM MyTable WHERE score >= (SELECT score FROM MyTable WHERE playerName = 'X'); (If you want to know this for all players, a single query would be more efficient.)


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The matrix differ from R to perl. You can't use the same matrix ! for perl this is the matrix (into brackets): word2 ~word2 word1 [n11] n12 | [n1p] ~word1 n21 n22 | n2p -------------- [np1] np2 [npp] For R this is the matrix (into brackets): word2 ~word2 word1 [n11] [n12] | ...


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Depending on the purpose, you might want to consider an interactive pairs plot. You could use the pairsD3() function or the shiny interface from the pairsD3 R package, which provides a way to interact with (potentially large) scatter plot matrices by selecting a few variables at a time. Hovering over the points reveals a tooltip with information about the ...


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You could use the Tools.Covariance() method in the Accord.Statistics nuget package. http://accord-framework.net/docs/html/M_Accord_Statistics_Tools_Covariance.htm To do something like this: using Accord.Statistics; public void CalculateMatrixCovariance() { var matrix = new double[,] { {3,5}, {9,10}}; var covMatrix = ...


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I'm not sure if it's possible to come up with the best solution in less than exponential time, the problem may not have enough structure. But here is a heuristic to come up with a 'good' solution. I think the way to do this is to start with wordset having size 0, and adding words to it one by one in a 'clever' way with a max of 20. Consider that for a ...


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STEP 1 should be to create a data structure that has only the words in sentences that appear in common_words. The structure can also have the number of times the word appears and a set of integers that references which sentences' the word is in. counts[..., { word:string, count:number, ids:Set<number> }, ...] Some pseudo code countsMap = ...


1

double round(double d, int n) { double last = d * pow(10, n + 1); int last_dig = floor(last) % 10; if (last_dig != 5) return reg_round(d, n); //round as normal double pre_last = d * pow(10, n); int pre_last_dig = floor(pre_last) % 10; if (pre_last_dig %2 == 0) return floor(d,n); //last digit is even, floor. else ...


1

The very general rule of thumb is that if your fitting function is not fitting well enough to your actual data then either: You are using the function wrong, e.g. You are using 1st order polynomials - So if you are convinced that it is a polynomial then try higher order polynomials. You are using the wrong function, it is always worth taking a look at: ...


0

import java.util.*; public class stdevClass { public static void main(String[] args){ int [] list = {1,-2,4,-4,9,-6,16,-8,25,-10}; double stdev_Result = stdev(list); System.out.println(stdev(list)); } public static double stdev(int[] list){ double sum = 0.0; double mean = 0.0; double num=0.0; double numi = 0.0; double ...


0

To your specific concern: "I don't want a user to just repeatedly beat a user with a very low rank and progress to #1": Instead of always transferring one point from the loser to the winner on every game, a simple approach might be to transfer a point scaled by the difference in player ranks. This reflect that the weaker the opponent, the less meaningful ...


0

I have been struggling with the same problem. Here is how I handled this: Let gmean_p(x1,...,xn) be the generalized mean where p is real but not 0, and x1, ..xn nonnegative. For M>0, we have gmean_p(x1,...,xn) = M*gmean_p(x1/M,...,xn/M) of which the latter form can be exploited to reduce the computational error. For large p, I use M=max(x1,...,xn) and for p ...


1

For detecting structural change, there needs to be a notion of what is stability. This is necessary because there are many variations that are regular in some way, e.g., you could have a stationary time series with constant mean and variance. Or you could have a stable seasonal pattern. Or a stable drift in a random walk. Or some stable autoregressive ...


0

U can use below function and pass DataFrame to it: def linear(x, y=None, show=True): """ @param x: pd.DataFrame @param y: pd.DataFrame or pd.Series or None if None, then use last column of x as y @param show: if show regression summary """ import statsmodels.api as sm xy = sm.add_constant(x if y is None else ...


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To convert a 1x1 matrix to a pure scalar in Armadillo, use the as_scalar() function. For example: mat X(1,1, fill::ones); double val = as_scalar(X);


1

Looking at the InternalExterdedStats.java source code, variance and standard deviation appear to be the population values: @Override public double getVariance() { return (sumOfSqrs - ((sum * sum) / count)) / count; } @Override public double getStdDeviation() { return Math.sqrt(getVariance()); }


1

Thanks to Roberto Ferrer! I've written a Python function based on http://www.stata.com/manuals13/rcentile.pdf, which produces the same result as Stata does: def centile(arr, percentiles=[50]): result = {} s = np.sort(arr) n = len(s) for percent in percentiles: R = float(n + 1) * percent / 100 r, f = int(R), R - int(R) ...


0

If you are keeping the data in an array format here is a solution: import numpy as np #Find the mean of the array data values mean_value = np.mean(data_mean) #Find the standard deviation of the array data values standard_deviation = np.std(data_mean) #create an array consisting of the standard deviations from the mean array = data_mean/standard_deviation ...


0

data_mean = np.mean(my_array) #gets you the mean of the whole array return an array where every value is the mean of your data meanArray = np.ones(my_array.shape)*data_mean variationFromMean = my_array - meanArray Is this what you were looking for?


1

NP-hard by reduction from CLIQUE (assuming that we replace 20 with a parameter). Given a graph in which we're looking for a k-clique, assign each vertex a unique word, make the two-word sentence corresponding to each edge, and try to select k choose 2 sentences that include each word k - 1 times. Need to think about whether there's an algorithm with ...


0

It's been a long time since I used JRI but I think you can use assign(). Here's a simple example passing an array of doubles: re.assign("newdata", new double[] {1.5, 2.5, 3.5});


1

You could use a simple for loop: cdf = scipy.stats.norm.cdf # just a shortcut for i in range(10): lo = 30 + 20*i hi = lo + 20 freq = cdf((hi-mean)/sd)-cdf((lo-mean)/sd) print 'interval', lo, 'to', hi, 'freq', freq or you could calculate it using arrays (also called vectorized): start, interval = 30, 20 count = 10 lo = start + ...



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