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1

You may find that the ClassificationKNN class is a better fit for your needs than than the knnsearch function. knnsearch just finds nearest neighbours; ClassificationKNN applies that to build a classification model. You can do it yourself as well if you want, but ClassificationKNN is a lot easier. For example: % X is your nx2 array of training data % Y is ...


-1

I know this post is a little old but I would like to share a small project I created yesterday. I think the easier way is to use C++ 11 and create a .dll in Managed C++. There's a link to the source and a zip containing the dll already compiled. And the code I made : // NormalDistributionRandom.h #include <random> #pragma once using namespace ...


0

Using the free add-on "PrestaShop Cleaner" in Prestashop 1.6.x you can clean your database of clients and orders. That will clean your statistics as well. Don't forget to make Backups before doing that.


0

Use the plyr() package to split up the data structure and then apply a function to combine all the results back together. install.packages("plyr") # install package from CRAN library(plyr) # load the package into R dd <- list(subject=c("0146si", "0162le", "1323er", "0811ne", "0825en"), sex = c(1,1,1,0,1), age = c(67,72,54,41,44), ...


1

Well, the way you described your problem, the only way of checking statistical difference is by varying your datasets. Generate several different datasets, and run algorithms A and B on them, comparing the results (it's unclear if your quality metric is the result correctness or the time taken, but it works both ways).


0

I spent my 4th year Computing project on implementing time series forecasting for Java heap usage prediction using ARIMA, Holt Winters etc, so I might be in a good position to advise you on this. Your best option by far is using the R language, you can call on the forecasting libraries provided by R, through Java by using the JRI library found here. R is ...


0

Try the by function: if your data frame is named df: by(data=df, INDICES=df$ageBin, FUN=summary)


3

You can pass additional args to np.std in the agg function: In [202]: df.groupby('A').agg(np.std, ddof=0) Out[202]: B values A 1 0.5 2.5 2 0.5 2.5 In [203]: df.groupby('A').agg(np.std, ddof=1) Out[203]: B values A 1 0.707107 3.535534 2 0.707107 3.535534


0

You could try to calculate the standard deviations all at once, using the following identity: To get the sum of all elements in a local neighborhood, you can use a convolution. def std_convoluted(image, N): im = np.array(image, dtype=float) im2 = im**2 ones = np.ones(im.shape) kernel = np.ones((2*N+1, 2*N+1)) s = ...


0

Your problem with approach #1 is that the sample isn't sorted: S<-sort(meanOfSampleMeansVector) propDensity=dnorm(S,mean(meanOfSampleMeansVector),sd(meanOfSampleMeansVector)) plot(S,propDensity, xlab="x value", type="l", ylab="Density", main="Sample Means of Exponential Distribution",col="red") Also I think you should take a look at density() if you ...


0

Base graphics can do this just as well: xval <- seq(min(meanOfSampleMeansVector), max(meanOfSampleMeansVector), length=200) propDensity=dnorm(xval, mean(meanOfSampleMeansVector), sd(meanOfSampleMeansVector)) plot(xval,propDensity, xlab="x value", type="l", ylab="Density", main="Sample Means of Exponential Distribution",col="red")


0

require(ggplot2) qplot(meanOfSampleMeansVector,propDensity,geom="line")+ xlab("x value")+ylab("Density")+ ggtitle("Sample Means of Exponential Distribution") I do it with ggplot2


4

heplot is an S3 generic function. It uses a method, heplot.mlm, which is a non-exported function. You can access that information by first looking at the function body of heplot. If you see UseMethod in a function body, the function uses a method. All the available methods for S3 generic functions can be accessed with methods > methods(heplot) To ...


0

You are looking for a normalization technique called "min-max scaling" For the more typical 0-1 normalization you would use the equation (x - min) f(x) = -------------- max - min And if you want a specific range (a, b), you can simply modify the equation like so: The equation is simply: (b-a)(x - min) f(x) = -------------- ...


0

Use do.call with rbind and lapply for more simple and compact solution: df <- data.frame(a = rnorm(100), b = rnorm(100), c = rnorm(100)) do.call(rbind, lapply(df, function(x) shapiro.test(x)[c("statistic", "p.value")])) #> statistic p.value #> a 0.986224 0.3875904 #> b 0.9894938 0.6238027 #> c 0.9652532 0.009694794


1

Everything in Universal Analytics works through the Measurement Protocol which, at the end of the day, is just HTTP requests to the GA backend. All of the GA tracking libraries out there (analytics.js for Web and the Android and iOS SDKs) are just sugar on top of the Measurement Protocol. If you want to send data to GA, you're going to need to have network ...


2

I also couldn't find how to extract the table of tests but as a workaround you can calculate the results by running the Anova command over all test types. However the print method, print.Anova.mlm does not return the results, so this needs to be tweaked a little. library(car) # create new print function outtests <- car:::print.Anova.mlm # allow the ...


3

fm1$multivariate.tests gets you to the Site portion of the fm1 output. Then you could use a combination of cat and capture.output for nice printing, or just capture.output for a character vector. > cat(capture.output(fm1$multivariate.tests)[18:26], sep = "\n") # # Multivariate Tests: Site # Df test stat approx F num Df den Df ...


1

It sounds as though you have a bipartite graph, where the vertices in one part correspond to instances, the vertices in the other part correspond to command/worker pairs, and the edges correspond to trials. You would like to find subsets of instances and command/worker pairs inducing a biclique maximizing some size parameter; maybe number of edges? ...


1

The only way I know of to get random documents from an index (at least in versions <= 1.3.1) is to use a script: sort: { _script: { script: "Math.random() * 200000", type: "number", params: {}, order: "asc" } } You can use that script to make some weighting based on some field of the record. It's possible that in the future they ...


0

The mean, variance can be easily updated. For minimum and maximum you need to keep all data, though, if you want to allow removals - if the largest or smallest data is removed, re-scan to find the now-largest or smallest. Not much more to say. Just do it.


0

The gray line shows the survival plot on your diagram. When you select Show Points and Show Combined, the survival plot for the total or combined sample appears as a gray line. The points also appear at the plot steps of each group. http://www.jmp.com/support/help/Survival_Platform_Options.shtml See also: ...


0

thank you for your answer. I'm not sure to understand what OLS does actually.Is it the same than the ANOVA done in R for example (aov package)? I'm not enough "comfortable" with statics to see the difference between OLS and f_oneway. I wrote the following code: from statsmodels.formula.api import ols formula = 'data.Glucose ~ data.Density + data.Hour + ...


0

You can simply read the documentation on varImpPlot, or look at it's source, which references the extractor function importance. You simply can call this function on your random forest object and then plot the data however you'd like: iris.rf <- randomForest(Species ~ ., data=iris, importance=TRUE) imp <- importance(iris.rf,type = 1) ...


3

You can detect high-multi-collinearity by inspecting the eigen values of correlation matrix. A very low eigen value shows that the data are collinear, and the corresponding eigen vector shows which variables are collinear. If there is no collinearity in the data, you would expect that none of the eigen values are close to zero: >>> xs = ...


0

Chi-square test works: df1 = structure(list(A = c(0L, 3L), C = c(2L, 15L), G = c(20L, 0L), T = c(70000L, 95000L)), .Names = c("A", "C", "G", "T"), class = "data.frame", row.names = 1:2) df1 A C G T 1 0 2 20 70000 2 3 15 0 95000 chisq.test(df1) Pearson's Chi-squared test data: df1 X-squared = 35.8943, df = 3, p-value = 7.884e-08 ...


0

Fisher's exact test in R only works on smaller data. If you reduce the data in column of T from 70000 and 95000 to 700 and 950, the Fisher test will work. Meanwhile, I tried chisq.test on your data and it worked. For larger data, chi-square test is preferred over Fisher's exact test.


1

library("dplyr") options(digits=4) StatsByState <- group_by(Your.df, State) summarise(StatsByState, Sum = sum(Cost), Mean = mean(Cost), StDev = sd(Cost)) options(digits=7) State Sum Mean StDev 1 AK 155 51.67 36.17 2 IL 1040 346.67 565.80 3 NE 720 240.00 242.49


0

I found the answer by trial and error, partly at least. 'The constructor takes the freedom, which is number of sides minus one' Dim chiSquared=New ChiSquared(5) Dim pValue=1-chi.CumulativeDistribution(16.2) '0.00629567' I had to implement the code to calculate the critical value of 16.2 myself,but that this not very hard of course: Public ...


0

As a general comment, try hard to express everything that you know about the physical system in a model, then use that model for inference. I worked on such problems in my dissertation: Unified Prediction and Diagnosis in Engineering Systems by means of Distributed Belief Networks (see chapter 6). I can say more if you provide additional details about your ...


0

Using dynamic programming, the time complexity is Θ(n*m) and space complexity Θ(m): def binomial(n, k): """ (int, int) -> int | c(n-1, k-1) + c(n-1, k), if 0 < k < n c(n,k) = | 1 , if n = k | 1 , if k = 0 Precondition: n > k >>> binomial(9, 2) 36 """ c = [0] * (n + 1) c[0] ...


0

Can I get stats on my indexes/tables since a certain date? No. Are is it always a collection of stats since the last pg_stat_reset()? Yes. So would I need to reset my stats in order to get a an accurate depiction? You need to do a stats reset to "forget" old data, yes. There's no way to reset stats to "one week ago" or whatever, because no ...


0

Install and use this mysql statistical functions: http://www.xarg.org/2012/07/statistical-functions-in-mysql/ After that, calculate median is easy: SELECT median( x ) FROM t1


0

pairwise_tukeyhsd only allows a single group variable, it is for oneway ANOVA. It is possible to make all pairwise comparisons for all fully interacted groups after creating a group index for all different explanatory variables. For example group1 = (A, HD, AM, 1), group2 = (A, HD, AM, 2), and so on. For pairwise comparison for only some effects, we would ...


1

have a look at this page: I also have similar question asked here It seems we can use cophenetic correlation to measure the similarity between two dendrograms. But there seems no function for this purpose in R currently. EDIT at 2014,9,18: The cophenetic function in stats package is capable to calculating the cophenetic dissimilarity matrix. and the ...


0

My thought process towards the above problem is outlined below: NOTE: The Solution assumes that there are at least five participants for the problem. The participants are randomly allocated a position The participants sit at the nominated position on the table with the beer that they brought. The participants rotate clockwise, taste 1/4 pint of beer, and ...


1

In case anybody was wondering, this is how it is done. public static double MeanGreaterThenZero(List<double> data) { return 1 - StudentT.CDF(0, 1, data.Count - 1, data.Mean() * Math.Sqrt(data.Count) / data.StandardDeviation()); }


0

git fat -a find N where N is in bytes will return all the files in the whole history which are larger than N bytes. You can find out more about git-fat here: https://github.com/cyaninc/git-fat


1

It doesn't fail on a test set that matches your description (with or without added NA's) > dat <- matrix( sample(c(1:30, NA), 3000, rep=TRUE)) > groups <- factor(rep(letters[1:30], each = 100)) > fligner.test(dat,groups) Fligner-Killeen test of homogeneity of variances data: dat and groups Fligner-Killeen:med chi-squared = 17.7191, ...


1

I was in a team faced with a similar situation about 13 years ago. We used a tool called "PowerPlay", a Business Intelligence tool from Cognos. This tool was very friendly to the data analysts, with drill down capabilities, and all sorts of name based searching. If I recall correctly (it's been a while), The BI tool stored the data in its own format (a ...


0

Try: nums = 1:5 prob = c(85,8,4,2,1) xx = list() for(i in 1:5) xx[[length(xx)+1]] = rep(nums[i], prob[i]) xx = unlist(xx) xx sample(xx,1) [1] 1 sample(xx,1) will return values by the given distribution. For more samples at a time: sample(xx, 25) [1] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 You can check the distribution by: ...


0

x = sample(1:10,100, replace=TRUE) y = sample(1:10,100, replace=TRUE) s.x= sd(x) s.y= sd(y) mu.x = mean(x) mu.y = mean(y) se = sqrt(s.x^2/length(x) + (s.y^2/length(y))) t = (mu.x-mu.y)/se For confidence interval try your research on internet.


0

Not very efficient, and assumes that you can make sure that the cumsum adds up to 1. reqProb = c(0.85,0.08,0.04,0.02,0.01) nRandom = 100 # unlist(lapply(runif(nRandom,0,1),function(x) min(which(x<cumsum(reqProb))))) unlist(lapply(runif(nRandom,0,1),function(x) which(x<cumsum(reqProb))[1]))


0

Use sample.int(n, size = 1, prob = p) where for the probabilities you could use something like p <- exp(-(1:n)) or make use of the standard normal distribution p <- dnorm(1:n) Edit For your specific example use n <- 5 p <- c(0.85, 0.08, 0.04, 0.02, 0.01)


2

Another option (adapted from R to Python) and taken from the book Doing bayesian data analysis by John K. Kruschke) is the following: from scipy.optimize import fmin from scipy.stats import * def HDIofICDF(dist_name, credMass=0.95, **args): # freeze distribution with given arguments distri = dist_name(**args) # initial guess for HDIlowTailPr ...


3

Actually that is a pretty average/small data set. Just read it in like you would any data frame. Then the function you are looking for is t(), use ?t for more information


1

You can do that like this: library('ggvis'); mtcars %>% ggvis(~mpg, input_select(names(mtcars), map = as.name)) %>% layer_lines() # or specify by hand mtcars %>% ggvis(~mpg, input_select(c('wt', 'disp'), map = as.name)) %>% layer_lines() (the key is to use map and a suitable function, in this case as.name() does it but you can create your own ...


0

Yes, the API is documented here: https://developers.google.com/analytics/ HelloWorld example here: https://developers.google.com/analytics/solutions/articles/hello-analytics-api


0

Look at this link, it may answer your question:


0

short answer replace with other distribution if needed: n = 100 a_b = [rand() for i in range(n)] a_b.sort() # len(a_b[:int(n*.8)]) c = a_b[int(n*.8)] print c



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