Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

This same question was asked and fully answered over in the ggvis google discussion group (basically, you need to use 'eval' inside the 'filter' call). Posting the link to the answer (from the person who wrote the R package no less) here for future reference: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/ggvis/AJZCdjFcNaE


0

If you are gathering performance metrics (ROC,accuracy,sensitivity,specificity...) from identicially resampled data sets then you can perform statistical tests using paired comparisons. Most statistical software impliment Tukeys Range test (ANOVA). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tukey%27s_range_test. A formal treatment of this material is here: ...


2

You can try df$Folium.id <- do.call(paste0, df) df # Folium.ten Folium.hom Folium.id #1 091001 00 09100100 #2 091001 01 09100101 #3 091002 00 09100200 #4 091003 00 09100300 #5 091003 01 09100301 #6 091003 02 09100302


1

You can use df$Folium.id <- paste0(df$Folium.ten, df$Folium.hom)


1

df$Folium.id <- paste0(dat$Folium.ten,dat$Folium.hom)


0

Have you tried this function http://docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy-0.14.0/reference/generated/scipy.stats.mstats.zscore.html ? Also sp.stats.norm.ppf might help: Probability to z-score and vice versa in python


0

A classifier's quality can be measured by the F-Score which measures the test's accuracy. Comparing these respective scores will give you a simple measure. However, if you want to measure whether the difference between the classifiers' accuracies is significant, you can try the Bayesian Test or, if classifiers are trained once, McNemar's test. There are ...


0

I don't think this is how prop.trend.test is meant to work. You need an additional qualifier that bins your data into a before/after scenario. Then you want to see if there is any difference between the low/normal weight across these two scenarios. Think about formulating your problem as a 2x2 contingency table where the columns are the before/after and the ...


1

Here is a simple implementation. Like @DanielJohnson says you can just use the cdf form univariate normal, but it should be same as using the pmvnorm, shown below. The version using pnorm is much faster. ## Choose the matrix dimensions yticks <- xticks <- seq(-3, 3, length=100) side <- diff(yticks[1:2]) # side length of squares sigma <- ...


3

I'm not an R person, but I'm sure there is a CDF function for the normal distribution. If what you want is literally a matrix of the probability of falling into each square are depicted, we can use this CDF function to get the answer. Since the 2D normal distribution has independent marginal distributions, the question here just amounts to asking the 2 ...


1

variables used: - pos_base = 0 // base price of the position, at any given time - pos_amount = 0 // position amount (negative for shorts), at any given time - pl = 0 // total P/L, at any given time, fees already removed - tot_fees = 0 // total fees paid - volume = 0 // total volume exchanged RECORD_EXECUTION(side, ...


0

When you use the equality operator on numpy.ndarray (numpy arrays) , they give a list of booleans which contain the equality of each element of the array (like first element in the return array is the equality of first element of both arrays. | is the bitwise or operator in python, it is used to bitwise or the two truth arrays returned by the two equality ...


1

Well, Microsoft Excel does not handle built-in set operations. But you can emulate then by VBA using MATCH function and error handling. Here is the code that worked for me (I presume that you have heading on the first line): Sub set_operations() Dim i, j, rangeA, rangeB, rowC, rowD, rowE, rowF As Long Dim test1, test2 As Boolean rangeA = ...


5

You would want to build a data.frame containing the intervals and then add a layer of horizontal error bars to plot them. First, i transform your ranges into a data.frame xx<-llply(1:20, function(x) my_confidence_intervals()) xx<-data.frame(y=1:20*50, x=do.call(rbind, xx)) Now I add them to the plot ggplot(data.frame(x = ...


1

Concerning your function fgetparam I think that it is a nice starting point. Here's my suggestion with a few minor modifications: getparams2 <- function(myp) { m <- matrix(NA, nrow=length(myp), ncol=3) for (i in (1:length(myp))){ m[i,] <- sapply(1:3,function(x) myp[[i]][[x]]@test$statistic)} return(m) } This function represents a minor ...


0

I had the same issue when calling the function nanvar, and realised that there was a conflict with a function with the same name in the Fieldtrip toolbox (this Fieldtrip function calls nanvar_base). After removing the Fieldtrip/src folder from my paths, it worked fine.


0

You can use the sjt.corr function of the sjPlot-package, which gives you a nicely formatted correlation table, ready for use in your Office application. Simplest function call is just to pass the data frame: sjt.corr(df) See examples here.


0

I wrote a second function to get statistics in matrix form. Ideally I would like to combine both functions. I thought about lapply, but did not find the solution yet. fgetparam <- function(myp){ p_mat <- matrix(NA, nrow=2, ncol=3) for(i in 1:2){ for(j in 1:3 ){ p_mat[i,j] <- myp[[i]][[j]]@test$statistic } } return(p_mat) } ...


2

After asking this same question in cross correlated @wuber edited my post by adding the multidimensional-scaling keyword. With this keyword I could find many algorithms, starting from the wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multidimensional_scaling


2

You can obtain the value stored as "STATISTIC" in the output of the various tests with res_list <- mynormtest(testdf) res_list$a$shapiroTest@test@statistic res_list$a$jarqueberaTest@test@statistic res_list$a$lillieTest@test@statistic And correspondingly for set b: res_list$b$shapiroTest@test$statistic res_list$b$jarqueberaTest@test$statistic ...


1

Given the description of your data, here's a way to perform the analysis of variance and the Tukey test. First, some not-so-random data (which will give "interesting" results): set.seed(40) dat <- data.frame(Image = factor(rep(1:3, each=10)), Pleasing = c(sample(1:2, 10, replace=T), sample(c(1,3), 10, ...


0

Use ODS EXCLUDE to exclude tables you don't want to see in your output. Conversely, you can use ODS SELECT to display only the tables of interest. Table Names are ODS table names that you can find from the documentation or via ODS TRACE.


0

I found my answer some time ago but never got around to post it here. It requires only one for loop and the conditional statements are clearer. awk '{ all[$1]++ if ($2=="yellow") yellowfruit[$1]++ else if ($2="green") greenfruit[$1]++} END {for (fruit in all) print fruit,yellowfruit[fruit],greenfruit[fruit]}' Result: grapes 3 1 lemons 1 2 apples 2 3


0

You can be more generic, and handle any number of unknown color/fruit pairs like this: awk '{if(NF==2){fruit[$2][$1]++}} END{for(color in fruit){for(type in fruit[color]){print color " " type " " fruit[color][type]}}}' This will give the following output: yellow lemons 1 yellow apples 2 yellow grapes 3 green lemons 2 green apples 3 green grapes 1 If ...


0

If you have a set number, then you can use aggregation to get what you want. The structure of the query is: select ru1.idrole, ru2.idrole, ru3.idrole, ru4.idrole, count(*) from RolePerUser ru1 join RolePerUser ru2 on ru1.iduser = ru2.iduser and ru1.idrole < ru2.idrole join RolePerUser ru3 on ru2.iduser = ru3.iduser and ru2.idrole ...


2

As you say, one way to do it is a loop. For variables Apple1 to Apple100, forval j = 1/100 { egen std_Apple`j' = std(Apple`j') } For any more complicated varlist, use foreach instead. Say foreach v of varlist <varlist> { egen std_`v' = std(`v') } where the varlist in angle brackets (and also the angle brackets) should be replaced by ...


0

This should do what you want: names <- LETTERS[1:26] for(i in 1:dim(dataSelection)[2]){ mypath <- file.path("C:","Users","Desktop","PlotOutput",paste("myplot_", names[i], ".png", sep = "")) png(file=mypath) mytitle = paste("my title is", names[i]) plot(dataSelection[,i], main = mytitle) dev.off() } at least it works for me. I changed your ...


1

Let's suppose that the indicator variables concerned (you say "dummy variables", but that's a terminology over-used given its disadvantages) are x1 ... x7. From that definition it is taken that their values are 1 or 0, except that values may also be missing. Then the logic for the summary you want is gen xs = (x1 + x2 + x3 + x4 + x5 + x6 + x7) >= 2 if ...


2

Power law distribution as defined in numpy.random and scipy.stats are not defined for negative a in the mathematical sense as explained in the answer to this question: they are not normalizable because of the singularity at zero. So, sadly, the math says 'no'. You can define a distribution with pdf proportional to x^{g-1} with g < 0 on an interval which ...


1

The page you are learning from has an error, in that it doesn't tell you how to enter the data correctly. The ses variable is supposed to be a factor, as we can see from the data they give us, it is read in as numeric: str(hsb2$ses) If we convert it to a factor, we get the same answer as the example: hsb2$ses <- as.factor(hsb2$ses) a1 <- aov(write ...


1

apply will work if you specify the correct MARGIN. Assuming that you want to loop by columns apply(data1[-1], MARGIN = 2, adf.test, k=0) #$data.GDP_Quaterly # Augmented Dickey-Fuller Test #data: newX[, i] #Dickey-Fuller = -1.1982, Lag order = 0, p-value = 0.8989 #alternative hypothesis: stationary #$data.Employment_Rate # Augmented Dickey-Fuller ...


3

Is this what you are trying to obtain? res <- sapply(data1[2:3],function(x){ adf.test(x,k=0) }) #> res # data.GDP_Quaterly data.Employment_Rate #statistic -1.198207 -1.601795 #parameter 0 0 #alternative "stationary" ...


3

Using native R: plot(dat[,1]~dat[,2],ylab="Tensile Strength",xlab="Cotton weight percent",cex=1.5) points(sort(unique(dat[,2])),tapply(dat[,1],dat[,2],mean),pch=16,col=3,cex=1.5) If you want to show repeated cases you can do this: cwp=sort(unique(dat[,2])) ta=tapply(1:nrow(dat),list(dat[,2],dat[,1]),length) ft=function(v,x){# ...


0

You can use the caret package to do so: Data: library(rpart) train <- data.frame(ClaimID = c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10), RearEnd = c(TRUE, TRUE, TRUE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, TRUE, TRUE, FALSE), Whiplash = c(TRUE, TRUE, TRUE, TRUE, TRUE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, TRUE), Activity = ...


5

This can be done in ggplot2 with geom_jitter and stat_summary. Specifically, the geom_jitter would give you the black points on your graph: library(ggplot2) ggplot(mtcars, aes(factor(cyl), mpg)) + geom_jitter(position = position_jitter(width = .1)) p (The "jitter" is to add some noise in terms of the x-axis, as occurs in your example). Then the ...


0

Using your sample data: library(akima) library(ggplot2) interped <- with(temp_data, interp(time, depth, temp)) temp_data_interp <- with(interped, data.frame(time=rep(x, length.out=length(z)), depth=rep(y, each=length(y)), temp=as.vector(z)) ) Take a look at ?interp to adjust the number of output x and y values. Without interpolating, you get ...


0

As a note for people findings this later (like me): pandas.rpyhas been deprecated in the newest versions of pandas (>0.16) as noted here. That page includes information on updating code to use the rpy2 interface.


1

The simplest approach is just to randomly select 1,000 pixels from the original 200,000 using a simple random sample. The random sample will have a statistically similar distribution to the original set. If you want to take a more sophisticated approach that is less subject to random variation and doesn't contain duplicate colors, use a Color Quantization ...


0

You should choose the scaling scheme based on what makes sense with your data. There are different ways of scaling, and which one you'll use depends on the data. Each scheme brings values of different features into comparable ranges, but each of them preserve different types of information (and distort others) as they do so. And even though there are ...


2

IIUC, you're describing the classic problem of estimating the confidence interval of the mean with unknown variance. That is, suppose you have n results, x1, ..., xn, where each of the xi is a sample from some process of which you don't know much: not the mean, not the variance, and not the distribution's shape. For some required confidence interval, you'd ...


1

Trying out the example, it looks like the improvement is around 6%, but with a wide confidence interval. A break in trend doesn't look significant. The first models below are estimated with OLS with a shift in the constant. In the first case also a shift in trend. I use Poisson in the last model, since the values of the dependent variable are positive and ...


1

Calculating the rate of change (i.e change of value per week / month) might give a good idea if he change is accelerating or not. Another simple way would be to look at a "moving average". Calculate each week the average of the last X weeks. The average would be less sensitive to short lasting changes and "noise". You may need to try a few values of X ...


3

First things first, you do not need to loop over all entries in the column you can rely on R being vectorized. Then you could simply use gsub gsub(".*test.*", "TEST", dataset$EMAIL)


5

When you do length(dataset) you will return the number of columns in your dataframe, not the number of rows. To fix your loop, you can do 1:nrow(dataset). But actually you can get rid of the for loop entirely in this case and do dataset$EMAIL <- as.character(dataset$EMAIL) dataset$EMAIL[grepl("test", dataset$EMAIL, ignore.case=T)] <- "TEST"


1

Alternative using accumarray: (I added data for testing). clear clc close all D = [876 0 1; 159 2 3; 887 0 1 ;876 1 2 ;597 1 3 ;159 2 3;876 0 1; 876 0 1]; %// Find unique rows and their indices [x,~,z] = unique(D,'rows'); n=accumarray(z,1); rowstokeep = find(n>1); Out = [x(rowstokeep,:) n(rowstokeep,:)] Out = 159 2 3 2 876 0 ...


2

Try this. I've modified first row to provide a better example: data = [ 876 1 2 159 2 3 887 0 1 876 1 2 597 1 3 159 2 3 ]; [~, t, u] = unique(data, 'rows'); c = histc(u, 1:max(u)); ind = c>1; result = [data(t(ind),:) c(ind)]; Result: result = 159 2 3 2 876 1 2 2


3

I will change this comment into an answer since I have more: I like ELO ratings. Harkness wrote a book many years ago describing how the US Chess Federation implemented its rating with an extension of a basic ELO system. As an aside when a new player would be establish his rating the first 25 games were based on a strictly ELO system. (Wish I could give a ...


0

Stability means rate of change (derivative) is zero or close to zero. The test function spins up concurrency requests and tracks throughput. This rate starts off at zero, then spikes and dips until it eventually stabilises on the 'true' value. I would track your past throughput values. For example last X values or so. According to this values, I ...


1

Note that this is not an exact answer. I seriously have no idea what you are trying to do. But I can suggest you a way. Assuming that there is only one peak in the graph and you have all the 2D points data i.e; (X1,Y1)...(Xn,Yn)... Try calculating the differences between the Y values of adjacent points and get the minimum value if you are doing Yn-1 - Yn ...


0

From the API seasons Any valid seasons /games;seasons=2011,2012 This shows that you can filter the data to get info from specific seasons meaning that whatever information you want you can get through filters. Hope this helps.



Top 50 recent answers are included