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1

Actually spearmanr works, however pearsonr will not as it needs to calculate the mean of the array, dtype is not correct for string. See below: from scipy.stats import spearmanr, kendalltau, pearsonr result = [106, 86, 100, 101, 99, 103, 97, 113, 112, 110] parameter = ['A', 'B', 'A', 'B', 'A', 'B', 'A', 'B', 'A', 'B'] spearmanr(result, parameter) ...


0

The mode is of the most value that has occurred, so I sobreescrevi the function I found here and I made this: CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION _final_mode(anyarray) RETURNS anyelement AS $BODY$ SELECT CASE WHEN t1.cnt <> t2.cnt THEN t1.a ELSE NULL END FROM (SELECT a, COUNT(*) AS cnt ...


0

Assuming you are talking about the time to find an average bug not the total number of bugs, I think this is actually wrong for reasonably well architected software. Here's why. Assume that, for a given programming environment (language + infrastructure + 3rd part packages + type of software (CAD, database, whatever)) that there is some maximum size ...


1

I don't think this theory is 100% correct. Here is some reasons why: Syntax Complexity Although it might seem common sense from the first look that the less code to look at, the easier it is to get the defect, but there is a limit where condensed code become so complicated that although it's fewer in lines, it's way harder to understand. So I guess where ...


0

It's going to be pretty much a direct translation in R y <- numeric( length=100) y[1] <- 0.2 et <- rnorm(100) for( t in 2:100) { y[t] = 0.2 + 0.5*y[t-1] +et[t] } For reproducibility put set.seed(num) in front where num is an integer and to do it 100 or 1000 times, put it inside a replicate call. plot(y)


0

Looks like I was able to answer my own question. The problem was that R took a lot longer to got through the mle2 calculation along with the integration of the dstable function. Log-likelihood results took less than 10 seconds for the other distributions but for some reason, it took over 45 minutes!! for the stable distribution. I only figured this out after ...


2

In many applications, the concept of covariance is like the variance, but applied to a comparison of two vectors: in place of the sum of squares, we have a sum of cross-products. According to your comment: I want to calculate (X-mean(X))TC^-1(Y-mean(Y)), I guess you are looking for something like the following: X=randn(250,1); Y=randn(250,1); C = ...


1

Sure there is. Exclude the interaction term in your model. > my.data <- data.frame(y = rnorm(100), region = rep(c("a", "b"), each = 50), gender = sample(c("M", "F"), 100, replace = TRUE)) > head(my.data) y region gender 1 0.3333316 a M 2 1.6364059 a F 3 0.6679500 a F 4 -0.7460313 a M 5 ...


0

As @Marcus Rickert asked, you didn't specified data source, but I will suppose that is some SQL like database because you asked for right SQL query. This one: SELECT Interaction_date, Interaction_name, count(Interaction_name) from your_table group by Interaction_date,Interaction_name order by Interaction_date asc; It will produce: Interaction_date ...


1

You say I have a sample data, the logarithm of which follows a normal distribution. Suppose data is the array containing the samples. To fit this data to a log-normal distribution using scipy.stats.lognorm, use: s, loc, scale = stats.lognorm.fit(data, floc=0) Now suppose mu and sigma are the mean and standard deviation of the underlying normal ...


0

Based on the commands, it seems like you wanted to generate n numbers in a sequence. You can use seq to do that. seq(1, 1001, by=10) # [1] 1 11 21 31 41 51 61 71 81 91 101 111 121 131 141 #[16] 151 161 171 181 191 201 211 221 231 241 251 261 271 281 291 #[31] 301 311 321 331 341 351 361 371 381 391 ...


0

I know this has been solved, however I came across the same issue and think there is a better way. The issue with using options(na.action = "na.fail") is that it changes the global settings of R. If you have a large script changing the global settings will potentially impact on other sections of your code where you implicitly rely on R's default settings. ...


0

Got it! The problem that I talk about in the comments to mdurant's answer is that the surface is not plotted as a nice square pattern like these matplotlib - 3D plots - combining scatter plot with surface plot. I realized that the problem was my meshgrid, so I corrected both ranges (x and y) and used proportional steps for np.arange. This allowed me to ...


0

Looks like the levy function in the VGAM package is what you are looking for (click).


1

You were correct in assuming that plot_surface wants a meshgrid of coordinates to work with, but predict wants a data structure like the one you fitted with (the "exog"). exog = pd.core.frame.DataFrame({'TV':xx.ravel(),'Radio':yy.ravel()}) out = fit.predict(exog=exog) ax.plot_surface(xx, yy, out.reshape(xx.shape), color='None')


0

I had the same errors and I was able to fix it by replacing below tot.cbt <- dc.CreateFreqCBT(elog.cal) #used elog.cal instead of elog However, I am having issues with : sel = cal.cbs$x < cal.cbs$T.x > Error in cal.cbs$x : $ operator is invalid for atomic vectors sel = cal.cbs$x < cal.cbs$t.x > Error in cal.cbs$x : ...


1

Here's a base solution: t(apply(df, 1, function(a) { i <- is.na(a) ifelse(rev(cummin(rev(i)) != 1), a[which(!i)[cumsum(!i)]], NA) })) ## H0 H1 H2 H3 H4 H5 ## [1,] 35.4 35.4 35.4 32.9 32.9 33.2 ## [2,] 36.0 34.0 33.5 33.5 33.1 NA ## [3,] 36.0 33.4 33.4 34.0 NA NA ## [4,] 36.4 36.4 34.2 34.2 34.2 32.8


1

I think you're misunderstanding the purpose of this operation. This operation tells you the information about Geo Replication Status on your blob storage account and not how much space you're occupying for blob storage. From on the REST API documentation for Get Service Stats: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/azure/dn495326.aspx The Get Blob ...


2

Transpose, use na.fill to fill in the trailinig NAs with 0 and use na.locf to fill in the remaining NAs and transpose back. Finally replace the zeros with NAs: library(zoo) df0 <- t(na.locf(na.fill(t(df), c(NA, NA, 0)))) ifelse(df0 == 0, NA, df0) giving: [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [1,] 35.4 35.4 35.4 32.9 32.9 33.2 [2,] 36.0 34.0 33.5 33.5 ...


1

If you look at ?na.locf you will see there is an option na.rm to retain leading NAs. So by reversing twice you can make it preseve trailing NAs. The problem is that in this case it uses the endpoint rather than the first point of the interval it is replacing and using fromLast together with na.rm doesn't fix this (the NAs are not preserved). So an ugly but ...


0

Once you've identified the distribution you want, you need to obtain the quantile function for that distribution. If not available directly in Excel, code it up in VBA. Then you use the function RAND and use that as the input to the quantile function. The resulting random numbers will be distributed correctly.


0

Did it like this and it worked then: final PieRenderer pieRenderer = pieChart.getRenderer(PieRenderer.class); pieRenderer.setDonutSize((float) 75 / 100, PieRenderer.DonutMode.PERCENT); selectDataType(); pieChart.setOnTouchListener(new View.OnTouchListener() { @Override public boolean onTouch(View v, ...


-1

To generate integer numbers from 1 to 5 You can try this formula: =ROUND(RAND()*(5,5-0,5)+0,5;0). They will generate the numbers: 1,2,3,4,5. And every number has a probability to be 0.2. Normal distribution will generate double type numbers, not integer.


0

Download a free trial of the software here and open your JMP files. Save AS to Excel format. Worst case upload your file to web and share link and see if someone with JMP can convert for you. I have tried converting JMP files to Excel without the program and was not successful- not sure it can be done.


0

If your treatment vector is a factor - you probably did ANOVA. Instead of glm I would use aov() in this case. model1 <- aov(regeneration ~ ftreatment, data=yourData) summary(model1) To check how the treatments compare to each other some kind of post-hoc test should be used. R has TuckeyHSD implemented for that. You can visually inspect the differences ...


0

The problem you have lies in the <=. In the document you linked, they add it to over if t >= 1.98, so it should be added to under only for values t < 1.98, or sum(perm) < Tobs.


0

I'll assume the support of the random variable X is nonnegative real numbers since you are taking the square root of it. The cumulative density function (CDF) for X is FX(t) = P(X ≤ t) The CDF for sqrt(X) is Fsqrt(X)(t) = P(sqrt(X) ≤ t) = P(X ≤ t2) = FX(t2) So given the CDF for X, to evaluate the CDF for sqrt(X) at position t, simply evaluate the ...


0

One more simple way to do it by using function "sapply" (or the same could be done with 'for' loop as well) m <- matrix(c(1:9), ncol = 3) (m1 <- as.numeric(sapply(1:NROW(m), function(i)(m[,i]))))


1

Currently, wand doesn't support any of the statistic methods from ImageMagick's C-API (outside of histogram and EXIF). Luckily the wand.api is offered for extending functionality. Find the method you need in MagickWand's documentation. Use ctypes to implement data types/structures (reference header .h files) from wand.api import library import ctypes ...


0

I would: -first figure out if it works and how to train and generate predictions -then pick a couple of datasets and divide it into your training and test data -train and test the blackbox model and compare the results with a couple of known models the point to stress here is to make sure you don't train your model(s) with your testing data...because ...


1

Based on the @kikito implementation but with another flavor: def get_consistency(sequence) proximity = sequence.each_with_index.map do |element, index| index > 0 ? distance(element, sequence[index-1]) : 0 end.reduce(:-) proximity / sequence.length.to_f end def distance(value1, value2) value1 == value2 ? -1 : 1 # Categorical variable ...


1

I could count the number of "changes" (from 0 to 1 or viceversa) and divide it by the total number of elements in the sequence. If the sequences can have things different from 1s and 0s, I would make the "distance" between each element count. So a change from 0 and 1 "costs" 1, but a change from 0 to 2 "costs" 2, etc. def get_consistency(sequence) change ...


0

I wrote up chunk of R-code that seems to do the job: #Set censoring point a<-0 #Generate random censored data x<-rnorm(1000,-1,2) x[x<a]<-a length(which(x>a)) #Log-likelihood function ll<-function(u=0,s=1){ -sum(pnorm(a,mean=u,sd=s,log=TRUE)*(x==a)+dnorm(x,mean=u,sd=s,log=TRUE)*(x>a)) } #Run MLE - change initiation values (u and s) ...


0

When your sample is the population, divide by n. Otherwise, divide by n-1 because you are losing one degree of freedom in estimating mean from the same sample. For large samples this should make hardly any difference.


1

This groups a Cartesian product by sales number to find the "middle" 1 or 2 sales and then averages the result to given the median. See detailed comments in-line. --the subquery will return the 1 or 2 middle values and the average of those is the median select avg(sales * 1.0) as median from ( select g1.sales --this creates a cartesian ...


0

We can stop as soon as the two bits are different. Chance of stopping after 1st iteration: 1/2 (We stop if 0-1 or 1-0. We must continue if 0-0 or 1-1.) Chance of stopping after 2nd iterations: chance of continuing after first iteration * 1/2 = 1/4 Chance of stopping after 3rd iterations: 1/8 Chance of stopping after 4th iterations: 1/16 Chance of ...


1

Try: > dd = data.frame(sapply(candytext, summary)) > dd header1 header2 candy 1 3 nocandy 5 3 > chisq.test(dd) Pearson's Chi-squared test with Yates' continuity correction data: dd ...


1

It sounds like you want to treat your columns as independent samples. If so, this might not be the best data structure. But you could do #sample data candytext<-read.table(text='header1 header2 "nocandy" "nocandy" "nocandy" "nocandy" "nocandy" "nocandy" "nocandy" "candy" "nocandy" "candy" "candy" "candy"', header=T) #summarize ...


0

Here, I am trying to get summary on each column of df1 using lapply assuming that the column classes are factors. From the post, I guess that is the case. Using do.call(data.frame on the list output, converts it to data.frame. do.call(data.frame,lapply(df1, summary)) #in case a matrix output is needed, just replace `data.frame` with `cbind` # ...


0

The docs state that calling COEFF = pca(x) will return a p-by-p matrix, so your result is rather surprising (EDIT: this is because your x data set has so few rows compared to columns (i.e. similar to having 10 unknowns and only 3 equations)). Either way when they talk about variance They don't mean the variance of the coefficients of each component but ...


0

You should most definitely use matrix multiplication to get the results. The following is probably not the most efficient way, but it uses the formulas in a straightforward way. # input data yvec <- c(14, 22, 30, 40, 65) xvec <- c(1, 5, 8) jp <- matrix(c(.02, .05, .10, .03, .01, .17, .15, .05, .02, .01, .02, .03, .15, ...


0

There are besically two ways of doing this: Use the affiliate program's API's. Build scrapers for each website. The scraper will basically log on to each site and extract all the info needed on a given interval. No-1 is preferred but not all affiliate programs have API's. Take a look at current services like this and see a bit how they work. Take a ...


1

Some optimization of your for loop could be had, but this should work for now. This code will repeat itself 100 times. result <- replicate(100, { pvals=c() for (i in 1:ncol(my_geno)){ my_pheno=sample(my_pheno,replace=F) pvals[i]= anova(lm(my_pheno~my_geno[,i]))[1,5] print(i) } which.min(pvals) })


0

You created a dataset with nominal vectors, not scalar ones. So, correlations between not numeric vectors is always 0.


0

The fast answer is use hum_stat_hosp = array_hosp_group.to_vector hum_stat_dis = array_dis_group.to_vector Because Crosstab doesn't work with scalar. That is a bug that I should fix :P


0

Your ymax is 100*sin(pi) which is 0, same as ymin. So your second histogram is binning incorrectly. I've fixed that, and a few other things in your code. But the reason that it's not working is a different issue. You are calculating the expected value of distance by applying your function to the expected of the angle. This is not correct because the ...


4

There are some things to notice here. To clarify, lets start by changing your errors from a uniform distribution runif(x,-3,3) to std.normal distributed errors: rnorm(x). You can then easily simulate your data, then set up your (minus) loglikelihood and maximize (minizime) by: a<-10; b<-0 set.seed(99) x<-apply(matrix(seq(1,10,1), nrow=1), 1, ...


0

You can certainly check your expectations for this small example using the formula for the sample covariance. Or, in R: > cov(c(-2,0,0,2), c(0,1,-1,0)) [1] 0


0

You can easily create density and histogram plots using SCaVis scientific program for numeric computations. It is 100% Java. Please take a look at the manual and its examples. For Histograms, use "H1D" java class. For function, use "F1D" class. For plotting canvas, I use "HPlot" class


1

And if you came here looking for slicing two ranges of columns and combining them together (like me) you can do something like op = df[list(df.columns[0:899]) + list(df.columns[3593:])] print op This will create a new dataframe with first 900 columns and (all) columns > 3593 (assuming you have some 4000 columns in your data set).



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