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1

Here is a general approach: pie has a labels parameter so you can just use that, use \n for a line break, and add text under the name barplot has a return value which are the x-coordinates of each bar, so just use text along with the data (for the y-coordinates), and use pos = 3 to put the label above that {x, y} point. ex: par(mfrow = c(2, 1)) pie(1:3, ...


0

I don't think the install count in developer console has a 3-day delay. According to support document, "Daily installs by device" means devices which installed the app for the first time in the past day (which I guess is counted in PST timezone). In my own experience, the daily install count almost precisely matches the actual install count in a specific ...


0

Extracted from Google Support Daily installs by device: Devices which installed the app for the first time in the past day Daily installs by user: Unique users who installed the app on one or more of their devices for the first time in the past day My guessing is that it's possible to have more users than devices, specially if a device holds ...


0

This is a bit open ended, but there are many ways with the basic idea being start with the eigenvectors you want and alter the eigenvalues and/or re-arrange the eigenvectors to create different data sets. Here's two simple working examples. First, you can just scale the eigenvalues of matrix A and then generate matrix B which will be different but has ...


3

The base R alternative is to use xtabs: xtabs(V3 ~ V1 + V2, mydf) # V2 # V1 1 2 3 4 # pat1 2 0 1 2 # pat2 0 0 3 0 # pat3 4 3 0 0 or reshape: reshape(mydf, direction = "wide", idvar = "V1", timevar = "V2") # V1 V3.1 V3.3 V3.4 V3.2 # 1 pat1 2 1 2 NA # 4 pat2 NA 3 NA NA # 5 pat3 4 NA NA 3


3

Using dcast from reshape2 : library(reshape2) dcast(dat,V1~V2,fill=0) V1 1 2 3 4 1 pat1 2 0 1 2 2 pat2 0 0 3 0 3 pat3 4 3 0 0 Where dat is : dat <- read.table(text='V1 V2 V3 pat1 1 2 pat1 3 1 pat1 4 2 pat2 3 3 pat3 1 4 pat3 2 3',header=TRUE)


0

I solved my problem minimizing the negative log likelihood function, as in the following pseudo code: #Gaussian function def mygauss(x, *p): mu, sigma = p return (1 / (math.sqrt(2 * math.pi) * sigma)) * np.exp(- (x - mu) ** 2 / (2. * sigma ** 2)) #Model to calculate the likelihood def pdf_model(x, p): mu1, ...


4

I haven't used spdep::lagsarlm but it is very easy to replicate the way lm uses weights using the following method: Let's assume you have a data.frame df defined as: df <- data.frame(a=runif(10), b=runif(10)) > df a b 1 0.8266429 0.43591733 2 0.4624063 0.93180891 3 0.7085656 0.36468984 4 0.3339251 0.79093356 5 0.8236406 ...


0

Your code seems to be generally bug-free but I made some changes since you perform needless repetitions over loops (I moved the outer loop inside and "vectorized" it since all moment calculations can be performed simultaneously for a given histogram. Also, it is building the histogram that takes longest). intel = cumsum(randn(64,1)); % <-- mock random ...


3

You’d be looking at java.lang.math, and from the docs: The class Math contains methods for performing basic numeric operations such as the elementary exponential, logarithm, square root, and trigonometric functions. So in short no. For distributions other than Gaussian you’re going to have to look elsewhere. In terms of third party libraries, ...


1

Well, you should first look a bit into regression analysis like has been commented. You have some issues in understanding there. But, this is what you want: obsGroupA <- round(runif(40, 240, 63535)) obsGroupB <- round(runif(40, 2478, 95063)) obsGroupC <- round(runif(40, 3102, 104799)) propGroupA <- obsGroupA/(obsGroupA + obsGroupB + obsGroupC) ...


0

Cross validation should always be the outer most loop in any machine learning algorithm. So, split the data into 5 sets. For every set you choose as your test set (1/5), fit the model after doing a feature selection on the training set (4/5). Repeat this for all the CV folds - here you have 5 folds. Now once the CV procedure is complete, you have an ...


-1

You can use arrows: arrows(x,y-sd,x,y+sd, code=3, length=0.02, angle = 90)


2

Start with identifying the core needs that you think monitoring will solve. Try to answer the two questions "What do I want to know?" and "How do I want to act on that information?". Examples of "What do I want to know?" Performance over time Largest API users Most commonly used API features Error occurrence in the API Examples of "How do I want to act ...


0

import pandas as pd import statsmodels.api as sm dta = sm.datasets.longley.load_pandas() dta.exog['constant'] = 1 res = sm.OLS(dta.endog, dta.exog).fit() df = pd.concat((res.params, res.tvalues), axis=1) df.rename(columns={0: 'beta', 1: 't'}).to_excel('output.xls', 'sheet1')


1

Can you run the same query in BigQuery, instead of on the data exported to Hive? My guess: "The data is stored in a hive table. I flattened all the nested and repeated fields before exporting." When flattening - are you repeating pageviews several times, with each repetition getting into the final wrong addition? Note how data can get duplicated when ...


2

You can do this easily with pandas. import pandas as pd data = np.random.random(20) stds = pd.rolling_std(data, window=7, center=True, min_periods=1) # min_periods to get the edges


1

You could create a very memory efficient view on the array using stride_tricks, but that will still not solve your problem of the window at the edges, where the window is "cut-off" or reduced. There, you could consider iterating over the different window sizes. It'll give you a speed boost if the windowsize is much smaller than the array over which you want ...


2

Don't convert your categorical variable into numeric variables - this will create a very different model [your attempts would not have worked anyway] There is no such thing as a "regression" estimate for the entire variable. If a categorical variable has n categories, the standard approach will create n-1 indicator variables, each of which will have a ...


0

i'd try my luck with a table function: create function fn_foobar() returns @Return table ( id int primary key , sv float , ev float , unique (sv,ev) ) as begin insert into @Return select d.id, d.sv, d.ev from events d left join events f on f.sv<d.sv and d.sv<=f.ev where f.id is null; declare @rowcnt int = 1; while (@rowcnt>0) ...


1

You need to use the na.action argument with na.omit of the train function. As the documentation says for na.action (type ?train): A function to specify the action to be taken if NAs are found. The default action is for the procedure to fail. An alternative is na.omit, which leads to rejection of cases with missing values on any required variable. (NOTE: ...


0

One approach to gaps-and-islands is to find all the places where there are gaps big enough to start an island, and then use that information to identify the islands. This may be what you mean by "invert". In your case, start with something like this: with e as ( -- This CTE gets the previous end value select e.*, (select max(endValue) ...


0

This is a implementation of Pearson Correlation function using numpy: def corr(data1, data2): "data1 & data2 should be numpy arrays." mean1 = data1.mean() mean2 = data2.mean() std1 = data1.std() std2 = data2.std() # corr = ((data1-mean1)*(data2-mean2)).mean()/(std1*std2) corr = ((data1*data2).mean()-mean1*mean2)/(std1*std2) ...


0

You should use n-1 instead of n because the number of degrees of freedom is n-1. se = s/math.sqrt(n-1) # use n-1 instead of n print "t-statistic = %6.12f p-value = %6.3f" % stats.ttest_1samp(x, mu0) t_manual = (x_bar-mu0)/se print t_manual Results: t-statistic = 0.84969783903281959 p-value = 0.410 0.84969783903281959


0

Based on what you explained i can suggest this simple function that will input the heart rate and the age range of your patient and return the %percentile based on a normal density of this specific range. my.quantile = function(myrange, heart.rate){ table <- data.frame('range'= c("range1", "range2", "range3"), 'mean' = c(120, 90, 60), ...


0

The describe() method in the psych package does include kurtosis and skew: dt = data.frame(a=rnorm(1000),b=rnorm(1000)) library(psych) describe(dt) vars n mean sd median trimmed mad min max range skew kurtosis se a 1 1000 0 1.01 0 0.01 1.00 -3.59 3.36 6.95 -0.06 0.17 0.03 b 2 1000 0 0.97 0 0.00 0.93 -3.15 ...


1

You can increase all number with minimum and convert it to percent. -17+abs(-50) = 33 -50+abs(-50) = 0 100+abs(-50) = 150 120+abs(-50) = 170 5+abs(-50) = 55 20+abs(-50) = 70 After all result should convert like an this: (number / max) * 100 (55 / 170) * 100 = 32.35% (70 / 170) * 100 = 41.17% (170 / 170) * 100 = 100%


1

just use fGarch package and these functions: dsnorm(x, mean = 0, sd = 1, xi = 1.5, log = FALSE) psnorm(q, mean = 0, sd = 1, xi = 1.5) qsnorm(p, mean = 0, sd = 1, xi = 1.5) rsnorm(n, mean = 0, sd = 1, xi = 1.5) ** mean, sd, xi location parameter mean, scale parameter sd, skewness parameter xi. Examples ## snorm - # Ranbdom Numbers: par(mfrow = c(2, ...


2

myvector + 2*sample(c(TRUE,FALSE), length(myvector), prob=c(0.2,0.8), repl=TRUE) That will give a variable number of 2's to be added (which is what you were asking) but sometimes people want to know that exactly 20% will have a 2 added in whoch case it would be: myvector + 2*sample(c(TRUE,rep(FALSE,4)))


0

Dont answer with like , if the link down people will not find the answer I copy the answer from blog Occasionally I get asked how big the .NET Framework is in terms of surface area for developers. As you might guess this is something we track. As you can see, in each release we are adding new functionality that make it easier to build .NET applications. ...


0

141 in total Distinct values: 80 with 3 40 with 5 21 with 15 Short example in Python: a = 0 b = 0 c = 0 for i in range(301): if i % 15 == 0: c += 1 elif i % 3 == 0: a += 1 elif i % 5 == 0: b += 1 print a, b, c


1

the following reproducible example shows jlhoward's comment is right, and Darko's reply is wrong: library(gstat) var1 = 1:3; var2 = 1:3; x = 1:3; y = 1:3 data<-list(var1,var2,x,y) coordinates(data) = ~x+y Error in (function (classes, fdef, mtable) : unable to find an inherited method for function ‘coordinates<-’ for signature ‘"list"’ ...


0

Depending on what distribution your going for you can test for it, remember that having more samples will approximate the distribution better (if you could take an infinite number of samples you would have the actual distribution). Since in real life we can't run our number generators an infinite number of times we only deal with approximated situations, so ...


0

A chi-square test checks how many items you observed in a bin vs how many you expected to have in that bin. It does so by summing the squared deviations between observed and expected across all bins. You can't just feed it raw data, you need to bin it first using something like scipy.stats.histogram.


0

If you read the t.test documentation in R you will see that for one-sample t.tests you shouldn't use the formula interface of the function (type ?t.test): The formula interface is only applicable for the 2-sample tests. So, in your case you need to create a subset of your data.frame according to the conditions you specified like this: df2 <- ...


0

In the end I used a combination of Rserve, rjson, and json4s (working in Scala). I prefer to use rjson and json4s to pass data in and out of the Rserve. Push data into R, run commands, get result: (untested) val rInput = ("MyTable" -> ("ColA" -> 1 to 10) ~ ("ColB" -> 11 to 20) ) ~ ("config" ...


0

The z-scores clearly are not the right way to go. The reason is that they are based on the assumption that your data is normal distributed. I have strong doubts that your data is normal distributed - in particular, it probably doesn't have any negative values, does it? Have you tried just using quantiles? top 10%, bottom 10% etc.?


1

It's because you are taking the first four digits that you get a skewed result. For 50% of the numbers you will get a result that is 65 digits long instead of 64, and the first digit is 1. For example adding the two numbers in your example: 3CDC3C8C9... CF27CC73E... = 10C0409007... Taking the first four digits from the result gives you 10C0. As you ...


0

A much simplified version of your design: var a=Math.floor((Math.random() * 10)); var b=Math.floor((Math.random() * 10)); What is the range of a+b? 0-18 Now take only the first digit of the result. Then 0-9 would still be their original value *but 10-18 becomes 1. To get the result you want, you need to remove the first digit for cases 10-18.


1

You need to run it like this using cbind: Data df <- read.table(header=T, text='Group Level1 Level2 a 1 0 a 2 3 a 4 3 b 2 4 b 1 3 b 3 2 c 2 4 c 3 2 c 1 3') Solution: > manova( cbind(Level1,Level2) ~ Group, data=df) Call: manova(cbind(Level1, Level2) ~ Group, data = ...


0

I think that the number of downloads is an incremental value. Each day, the number of new downloads add up to the previous days. 41/53 downloads is the number of currentlyInstalled/totalInstalls in that moment.


2

41 currently installed, 53 total installs (including those no longer installed).


0

I've tried several applications and methods to do that, and the best (for my company and our related projects) is to log key=value pairs (atomic entries with all the information associated with this operation like IP source, operation result, elapsed time, etc... on specific log files for each node/server) and then monitorize with Splunk. With your REST and ...


1

Here's one way. You can split your data, perform the regressions and use predict() to find the confidence intervals, then you can unsplit to return to the original structure. For example with your test data and splitting on the "genger" (sic) column in the sample data unsplit(lapply(split(data, data$genger), function(x) { m<-lm(weight~height, x) ...


0

Here is a sketch (pseudocode, not real code) of the EM algorithm. You don't need the histogram at all. function M_step (x, responsibility, j) bump_mean[j] = sum (x[j]*responsibility[i, j], j, 1, n) where n = length(x) bump_mean_x2[j] = sum (x[j]**2 * responsibility[i, j], j, 1, n) bump_variance[j] = bump_mean_x2[j] - bump_mean[j]**2 ...


2

You can try df$newCol <- apply(df[seq(5, ncol(df), by=2)], 1, sd) Or use rowSds from matrixStats library(matrixStats) df$newCol <- rowSds(as.matrix(df[seq(5, ncol(df), by=2)])) Or as commented by @DavidArenburg, you can check the vectorized RowSD data set.seed(253) df <- cbind(as.data.frame(matrix(sample(letters, 120*4, replace=TRUE), ...


1

Rejection sampling is worth a try. Compute the maximum weight of a sample (max of the abs of each of the k least and k greatest). Repeatedly generate a uniform random sample and accept it with probability equal to its weight over the maximum weight until a sample is accepted.


4

First test, then debug. Test Does rao.score.bern work at all? rao.score.bern(c(0,0,0,1,1,1), 1/6)) This returns...nothing! Fix it by replacing the ultimate line by 2 * (1 - pnorm(abs(z))) This eliminates the unnecessary assignment. rao.score.bern(c(0,0,0,1,1,1), 1/6)) [1] 0.02845974 OK, now we're getting somewhere. Debug Unfortunately, ...


0

That's a good answer, @John Dibling! I had a system quite similar to this. However, my "stat" thread was querying workers 10 times per second and it affected performance of the worker threads as each time the "stat" thread asks for a data, there's a critical section accessing this data (counters, etc.) and it means that the worker thread is blocked for the ...


1

If your test case is any indication of your real situation, your timestamps already fall on 15 minute intervals exactly and you don't need to trunc() at all. Just a plain GROUP BY / avg(): SELECT date_time, avg(value) As avg_val FROM temperature te JOIN "time" ti USING (id_date) WHERE date_time >= '2015-02-24'::date AND date_time < ...



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