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17

(to expand a bit on my comment) Numpy developers follow in general a policy of keeping a backward compatible binary interface (ABI). However, the ABI is not forward compatible. What that means: A package, that uses numpy in a compiled extension, is compiled against a specific version of numpy. Future version of numpy will be compatible with the compiled ...


16

Pandas has exponentially weighted moving moment functions http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/dev/computation.html?highlight=exponential#exponentially-weighted-moment-functions By the way, there shouldn't be any functionality leftover in the scikits.timeseries package that is not also in pandas. Edit: Since this is still a popular question, there is now ...


14

Looks like Python does not add an intercept by default to your expression, whereas R does when you use the formula interface.. This means you did fit two different models. Try lm( y ~ x - 1, data) in R to exclude the intercept, or in your case and with somewhat more standard notation lm(num_rx ~ ridageyr - 1, data=demoq)


11

The problem with using percentile is that the points identified as outliers is a function of your sample size. There are a huge number of ways to test for outliers, and you should give some thought to how you classify them. Ideally, you should use a-priori information (e.g. "anything above/below this value is unrealistic because...") However, a common, ...


9

As best I can tell, statsmodels 0.5.0 simply doesn't work with Python 3.4, even with Cython 0.20.1 (latest) installed. The latest master installed fine, however, so here's one approach if you're willing to use an unreleased version: git clone https://github.com/statsmodels/statsmodels cd statsmodels pip install . Update: This shouldn't be necessary using ...


9

try this: X = sm.add_constant(X) sm.OLS(y,X) as in the documentations: An interecept is not included by default and should be added by the user statsmodels.tools.tools.add_constant


8

you shouldn't untar it to /usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages (you could use any temporary directory) you might have used by mistake a different python executable e.g., /usr/bin/python instead of the one corresponding to /usr/local/lib/python2.7 You should use pip corresponding to a desired python version to install it: $ pip install statsmodels It ...


8

Statsmodels has scipy.stats as a dependency. Scipy.stats has all of the probability distributions and some statistical tests. It's more like library code in the vein of numpy and scipy. Statsmodels on the other hand provides statistical models with a formula framework similar to R and it works with pandas DataFrames. There are also statistical tests, ...


7

I took another look at this and realized that my previous answer fit poorly since it didn't include an intercept. I've updated my answer. The segfault comes from trying to us the Datetime index as the exogenous variable. Instead try: import datetime import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import statsmodels.api as sm import pandas from pandas.io.data import ...


7

Somehow some questions got merged or deleted, so I'll post my answer here. Exp smoothing in Python natively. ''' simple exponential smoothing go back to last N values y_t = a * y_t + a * (1-a)^1 * y_t-1 + a * (1-a)^2 * y_t-2 + ... + a*(1-a)^n * y_t-n ''' from random import random,randint def gen_weights(a,N): ws = list() for i in range(N): ...


7

For statsmodels >=0.4, if I remember correctly model.predict doesn't know about the parameters, and requires them in the call see http://statsmodels.sourceforge.net/stable/generated/statsmodels.regression.linear_model.OLS.predict.html What should work in your case is to fit the model and then use the predict method of the results instance. model = ...


7

The models and results instances all have a save and load method, so you don't need to use the pickle module directly. Edit to add an example: import statsmodels.api as sm data = sm.datasets.longley.load_pandas() data.exog['constant'] = 1 results = sm.OLS(data.endog, data.exog).fit() results.save("longley_results.pickle") # we should probably add a ...


7

There's nothing wrong with your code. My guess is that you have missing values in your data. Try a dropna or use missing='drop' to Logit. You might also check that the right hand side is full rank np.linalg.matrix_rank(data[train_cols].values)


7

Looks like you're ok on the first part, so I'll tackle your second and third points. There are plenty of ways to fit smooth curves, with scipy.interpolate and splines, or with scipy.optimize.curve_fit. Personally, I prefer curve_fit, because you can supply your own function and let it fit the parameters for you. Alternatively, if you don't want to learn a ...


6

The a simple (numerical) way to get a confidence interval is simply to run your script many times, and see how much your estimate varies. You can use that standard deviation to calculate the confidence interval. In the interest of time, another option is to run a bunch of trials at each value of N (I used 2000), and then use random subsampling of those ...


6

PyMC has a built in function for computing the hpd. In v2.3 it's in utils. See the source here. As an example of a linear model and it's HPD import pymc as pc import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt ## data np.random.seed(1) x = np.array(range(0,50)) y = np.random.uniform(low=0.0, high=40.0, size=50) y = 2*x+y ## plt.scatter(x,y) ## priors ...


6

Well, there is summary_col in statsmodels; it doesn't have all the bells and whistles of estout, but it does have the basic functionality you are looking for (including export to LaTeX): import statsmodels.api as sm from statsmodels.iolib.summary2 import summary_col p['const'] = 1 reg0 = sm.OLS(p['p0'],p[['const','exmkt','smb','hml']]).fit() reg1 = ...


6

Patsy isn't really useful for fitting general non-linear models, but the models on the page you link to are a special sort of non-linear model -- they're using a linear model fitting method (OLS), and applying it to non-linear transformations of the basic variables. A standard and very useful trick is to combine multiple non-linear transformations of the ...


6

You could use pd.factorize: In [124]: df.apply(lambda x: pd.factorize(x)[0]) Out[124]: A B 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 2 3 0 1 4 2 3 5 1 0 6 2 4


6

Not sure what your data manipulations are intending but they seem to be loosing information in the R run. If I keep all the rank information in, then I get this on the original data-object (and the results look very similar in the areas they overlap on. (Likelihoods are only estimated up to an arbitrary constant so you can only compare differences in ...


5

As is stated by df.index.dtype, despite you regard your timestamp as a datetime, it is an object. You can easely convert it to datetime with df.index = pd.to_datetime(df.index)


5

You can't pass a formula to Logit. Do: In [82]: import patsy In [83]: f = 'y ~ x' In [84]: y, X = patsy.dmatrices(f, df, return_type='dataframe') In [85]: sm.Logit(y, X).fit().summary() Optimization terminated successfully. Current function value: 0.511631 Iterations 6 Out[85]: <class 'statsmodels.iolib.summary.Summary'> """ ...


5

The main point of delicacy is defining bin_edges since technically they could be anywhere. I chose the midpoint between each pair of bin centers. Probably there are other ways to do this, but here is one: hists = [generate_random_histogram() for x in xrange(3)] for h in hists: bin_locations = h['loc'] bin_counts = h['count'] bin_edges = ...


5

From my understanding "central credible region" is not any different from how confidence intervals are calculated; all you need is the inverse of cdf function at alpha/2 and 1-alpha/2; in scipy this is called ppf ( percentage point function ); so as for Gaussian posterior distribution: >>> from scipy.stats import norm >>> alpha = .05 ...


5

Here is an answer to your first question and a pointer to a solution for the second: plot(xdata,ydata) # calculate the cumulative distribution function cdf = np.cumsum(ydata)/sum(ydata) # get the left and right boundary of the interval that contains 95% of the probability mass right=argmax(cdf>0.975) left=argmax(cdf>0.025) # indicate confidence ...


5

one way ANOVA can be used like from scipy import stats f_value, p_value = stats.f_oneway(data1, data2, data3, data4, ...) This is one way ANOVA and it returns F value and P value. There is significant difference If the P value is below your setting. The Tukey-kramer HSD test can be used like from statsmodels.stats.multicomp import pairwise_tukeyhsd ...


4

you can predict the future values using Pandas Exponentially-weighted moving average http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/generated/pandas.stats.moments.ewma.html as from pandas.stats.moments import ewma import numpy as np pred_period = 12 def predict(x,span,periods = pred_period): x_predict = np.zeros((span+periods,)) ...


4

It sounds like you are not feeding the same matrix of regressors X to both procedures (but see below). Here's an example to show you which options you need to use for sklearn and statsmodels to produce identical results. import numpy as np import statsmodels.api as sm from sklearn.linear_model import LinearRegression # Generate artificial data (2 ...


4

I really suspect that you are doing the same online course as I do -- the following allows you to get the right answers. If the task at hand is not very computationally heavy (and it isn't in the course), then we can sidestep all the smart details of the step function, and just try all the subsets of the predictors. For each subset we can calculate AIC as ...


4

The error is due to the fact that patsy expands the LHS variable to be a full Treatement contrast. Logit does not handle this as indicated in the docstring, but as you see GLM with binomial family does. I can't speak to the difference in the results without a full output. In all likelihood it's different default handling of categorical variables or you're ...



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