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0

I redid the R part like this: makeDummy = function(x, x1) { ifelse(is.na(x), NA, ifelse(x == x1, 1, 0)) } data = read.csv("http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/data/binary.csv", head=T) data$rank2 = makeDummy(data$rank, 2) data$rank3 = makeDummy(data$rank, 3) data$rank4 = makeDummy(data$rank, 4) summary(glm(admit ~ gre + gpa + rank2 + rank3 + rank4, ...


6

Not sure what your data manipulations are intending but they seem to be loosing information in the R run. If I keep all the rank information in, then I get this on the original data-object (and the results look very similar in the areas they overlap on. (Likelihoods are only estimated up to an arbitrary constant so you can only compare differences in ...


1

This is a result of different common definitions between statistics and signal processing. Basically, the signal processing definition assumes that you're going to handle the detrending. The statistical definition assumes that subtracting the mean is all the detrending you'll do, and does it for you. First off, let's demonstrate the problem with a ...


1

statsmodels is not directly of any help here, at least not yet. I think your linearized non-linear least square optimization is essentially what scipy.optimize.leastsq does internally. It has several more user friendly or extended wrappers, for example scipy.optimize.curve_fit or the lmfit package. Statsmodels currently does not have a generic version of ...


0

It looks like you found the github issue for this already. As you found, you can't do this yet, but we will hopefully have this functionality in 0.7. If you're feeling adventurous, you can install the branch mentioned in the issue.


1

The issue here is that you're passing two constant columns, then telling fit to add another constant column with trend='nc'. Admittedly, we should fail more gracefully here, but you need to try something like u = np.random.randn(100, 2) Instead of the constant exog.


4

I think you have switched your response and your predictor, like Michael Mayer suggested in his comment. If you plot the data with predictions from your model, you get something like this: import statsmodels.api as sm import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt Y = np.array([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,11,12,13,14,15]) X = np.array([ 73.76 , 73.845, 73.56 , ...


0

If you use the formula API for statsmodels, you can specify a constant intercept more concisely as part of a Patsy design matrix specification. This is still a bit hacky--it's basically just a cleaner way of expressing your proposed solution--but at least it's shorter. E.g.: >>> import statsmodels.formula.api as smf >>> import pandas as pd ...


2

There isn't, unfortunately. However, you can roll your own by using the model's hypothesis testing methods on each of the terms. In fact, some of their ANOVA methods do not even use the attribute ssr (which is the model's sum of squared residuals, thus obviously undefined for a binomial GLM). You could probably modify this code to do a GLM ANOVA.


0

You need to import statsmodels.api as sm


0

Ah, I see the issue. You don't have an ARIMA model. You have an ARMA model because d=0. ARMA.predict doesn't take a typ keyword argument because they don't need one.


0

See the typ keyword of predict in the docstring. It determines whether you get predictions in terms of differences or levels. The default is 'linear' differences not levels. As an aside, your start should not be greater than your end. If this works, then this may NOT be giving you what you want and should probably be reported as a bug.


3

I used your data and this code: mosaic(myDataframe, ['size', 'length']) and got the chart like this:



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