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58

OverviewXML documents are hierarchical documents, where the same element names and namespaces might occur in several places, having different meaning, and in infinitive depth (recursive). As normal, the solution to big problems, is to divide them into small problems. In the context of XML parsing, this means parsing specific parts of XML in methods specific ...


46

The encoding in your XML and XSD (or DTD) are different. XML file header: <?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8'?> XSD file header: <?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-16'?> Another possible scenario that causes this is when anything comes before the XML document type declaration. i.e you might have something like this in the buffer: helloworld&...


22

StAX is not a part of Java 5; you'll find it in Java 6, however. For Java 5, you'll need to download a StAX implementation and place it in the classpath. Woodstox is one such implementation. You could also use the Sun Java StAX XML processor, which has made its way into Java SE 6. Unless I'm mistaken, both of these implementations will eventually use the ...


18

Basically, a push is when the parser says to some handler, "I have a foo, do something with it." A pull is when the handler says to the parser, "give me the next foo." Push: if (myChar == '(') handler.handleOpenParen(); // push the open paren to the handler Pull: Token token = parser.next(); // pull the next token from the parser


16

There is com.sun.xml.txw2.output.IndentingXMLStreamWriter XMLOutputFactory xmlof = XMLOutputFactory.newInstance(); XMLStreamWriter writer = new IndentingXMLStreamWriter(xmlof.createXMLStreamWriter(out));


14

Can I point you to findjar.com, which allows you to enter a classname and determine which jar is required. e.g. XMLInputFactory yields jsr173_1.0_api.jar jsr173_api.jar stax-api-1.0.1.jar stax-api-1.0.1.jar stax-api-1.0.jar groovysoap-all-jsr06-0.1.jar


13

Woodstox wins every time for me. It's not just performance, either - sjsxp is twitchy and overly pedantic, woodstox just gets on with it.


13

There are two ways of XML validation possible with SAX and DOM: validate alone - via Validator.validate() validate during parsing - via DocumentBuilderFactory.setSchema() and SAXParserFactory.setSchema() With StAX, validation is possible, but only the first way of doing it. You can try something like this: import javax.xml.validation.*; import javax....


13

To generalize a bit, I think StAX can be as efficient as SAX. With the improved design of StAX I can't really find any situation where SAX parsing would be preferred, unless working with legacy code. EDIT: According to this blog Java SAX vs. StAX StAXoffer no schema validation.


13

@Rinke: I guess only time I think of preferring SAX over STAX in case when you don't need to handle/process XML content; for e.g. only thing you want to do is check for well-formedness of incoming XML and just want to handle errors if it has...in this case you can simply call parse() method on SAX parser and specify error handler to handle any parsing ...


12

Assuming you do nothing but parse the document, the ranking of the different parser standards is as follows: 1. StAX is the fastest The event is reported to you 2. SAX is next It does everything StAX does plus the content is realized automatically (element name, namespace, attributes, ...) 3. DOM is last It does everything SAX does and presents ...


12

You can parse and validate with StAX in one pass. Use javax.xml.stream.util.StreamReaderDelegate: XMLStreamReader reader = XMLInputFactory.newInstance().createXMLStreamReader(new FileInputStream ("test.xml")); reader = new StreamReaderDelegate(reader) { public int next() throws XMLStreamException { int n = super.next(); // ...


11

I would try to use the createXMLStreamWriter() with an output parameter too. [EDIT] Tried, it works by changing the createXMLStreamWriter line: XMLStreamWriter xtw = xof.createXMLStreamWriter(new FileOutputStream(fileName), "UTF-8"); [EDIT 2] Made a little more complex test, for the record: String fileName = "Test.xml"; XMLOutputFactory xof = ...


11

You could use a StAX (javax.xml.stream) parser and transform (javax.xml.transform) each section to a DOM node (org.w3c.dom): import java.io.*; import javax.xml.stream.*; import javax.xml.transform.*; import javax.xml.transform.stax.StAXSource; import javax.xml.transform.dom.DOMResult; import org.w3c.dom.* public class Demo { public static void main(...


10

SAX is faster because DOM parsers often use a SAX parser to parse a document internally, then do the extra work of creating and manipulating objects to represent each and every node, even if the application doesn't care about them. An application that uses SAX directly is likely to utilize the information set more efficiently than a DOM "parser" does. StAX ...


10

You could use a javax.xml.transform.Transformer to convert a StAXSource wrapping the reader to a StAXResult wrapping the writer. TransformerFactory tf = TransformerFactory.newInstance(); Transformer t = tf.newTransformer(); StAXSource source = new StAXSource(xmlStreamReader); StAXResult result = new StAXResult(xmlStreamWriter); t.transform(source, result); ...


9

The code provided should be considered a sketch rather than the definitive article. I am not an expert on SAX and the implementation could be improved for better performance, simpler code etc. That said SAX should be able to cope with streaming large XML files. I would approach this problem with 2 passes using the SAX parser. (Incidentally, I would also ...


9

DOM parsing requires you to load the entire document into memory and then traverse a tree to find the information you want. SAX only requires as much memory as you need to do basic IO, and you can extract the information that you need as the document is being read. Because SAX is stream oriented, you can even process a file which is still being written by ...


8

Via the JDK: transformer.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.INDENT, "yes");.


8

This looks like a good case for using XSL. Given your basic requirements it may be easier to get at the right nodes with XSL as compared to custom parsers or serializers. The benefit would be that your XSL could target "//Item//AverageTime" or whatever nodes you require without worrying about node depth. UPDATE: The following is the xslt I threw together to ...


8

Well XSLT 1.0 and 2.0 operate on a tree data model of the complete XML so XSLT 1.0 and 2.0 processors usually read the complete XML input document into a tree and create a result tree that is then serialized. You seem to assume that using StAX changes the behaviour of XSLT but I don't think that is the case, the XSLT processor builds the tree as the ...


8

As far as I know, both Woodstox and Aalto should work on Android. Aalto is the single fastest conforming XML parser on Java platform, if that matters; and Woodstox supports widest range of XML constructs (from full DTD handling to RelaxNG/XML Schema validation). For binding POJOs to XML, you could also consider Jackson extension jackson-xml-databind: while ...


8

If performance is an important factor, and/or the document size is large (both of which seem to be the case here), the difference between an event parser (like SAX or StAX) and the native Java XPath implementation is that the latter builds a W3C DOM Document prior to evaluating the XPath expression. [It's interesting to note that all Java Document Object ...


8

Try this XMLInputFactory inFactory = XMLInputFactory.newInstance(); XMLEventReader eventReader = inFactory.createXMLEventReader(new FileInputStream("1.xml")); XMLOutputFactory factory = XMLOutputFactory.newInstance(); XMLEventWriter writer = factory.createXMLEventWriter(new FileWriter(file)); XMLEventFactory eventFactory = ...


7

GAE is run in a hosted environment with untrusted (and potentially malicious) clients, who often are given access for free. In that type of environment, security is a very high concern, and APIs which have filesystem access get very heavy scrutiny. I think thats why they've chosen to start pretty conservatively in terms of what they allow. It wouldn't ...


7

The STaX API has support for the notion of not replacing character entity references, by way of the IS_REPLACING_ENTITY_REFERENCES property: Requires the parser to replace internal entity references with their replacement text and report them as characters This can be set into an XmlInputFactory, which is then in turn used to construct an ...


7

stax-utils provides class IndentingXMLStreamWriter which does the job: XMLStreamWriter writer = XMLOutputFactory.newInstance().createXMLStreamWriter(...); writer = new IndentingXMLStreamWriter(writer); ...


7

Basically, it's because you don't need to escape >. It's already doing the right thing.


7

If you use XMLStreamWriter, you can just use writeNamespace() and writeAttribute() (or just writeAttribute()). XMLStreamWriter xmlStreamWriter = XMLOutputFactory.newInstance().createXMLStreamWriter(System.out); xmlStreamWriter.writeStartDocument(); xmlStreamWriter.writeStartElement("YourRootElement"); xmlStreamWriter.writeNamespace("xsi", "http://www.w3.org/...


7

First: instead of relying on JDK SPI interface, I strongly recommend simplifying your life and NOT using it. It really adds no value over injecting XMLInputFactory and/or XMLOutputFactory yourself. For injection you can use Guice (or Spring); or just pass it manually. Since these factories do not have dependencies of their own, this is easy. But if choose ...



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