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32

In short, use std::function unless you have a reason to not. Function pointers have the disadvantage of not being able to capture some context. You won't be able to for example pass a lambda function as a callback which captures some context variables (but it will work if it doesn't capture any). Calling a member variable of an object (i.e. non-static) is ...


19

Yes, it is legal and well-defined to instantiate that stream. You can safely swap it with another stream, or give it a new pointer (this time to an extant buffer) at a later time. The output operation itself is indeed a no-op. Here's why: The construction has no non-null precondition, and has only this postcondition: [C++11: 27.7.3.2/2]: ...


16

The difference is that explicit vector( const Allocator& alloc = Allocator() ); is explicit even for the case where the default argument is used, while vector() : vector( Allocator() ) {} is not. (The explicit in the first case is necessary to prevent Allocators from being implicitly convertible to a vector.) Which means that you can write ...


10

Use std::function to store arbitrary callable objects. It allows the user to provide whatever context is needed for the callback; a plain function pointer does not. If you do need to use plain function pointers for some reason (perhaps because you want a C-compatible API), then you should add a void * user_context argument so it's at least possible (albeit ...


9

void (*callbackFunc)(int); may be a C style callback function, but it is a horribly unusable one of poor design. A well designed C style callback looks like void (*callbackFunc)(void*, int); -- it has a void* to allow the code that does the callback to maintain state beyond the function. Not doing this forces the caller to store state globally, which is ...


9

it would not be posiible if for example function end would return a pointer. For example this code will not be compiled int a[] = { 1, 2, 3 }; std::end( a ) = std::begin( a ); GCC issues error error: lvalue required as left operand of assignment std::end( a ) = std::begin( a ); ^ However when objects of class types are used then ...


7

I would use (C++14): std::adjacent_find( std::begin(x), std::end(x), [epsilon](const auto& lhs, const auto& rhs) { return lhs > rhs + epsilon;}) == std::end(x); as is_sorted would be misleading. or in C++11: std::adjacent_find( std::begin(x), std::end(x), [epsilon](const double& lhs, const double& rhs) { ...


6

Let's try with a bit more precision, std::cout.precision(20): 0.073052999999999979064 0.073053000000000034575 0.073053999999999952308 0.13801800000000000179 0.58552559999999997942 0.70509800000000000253 1.6001160000000000938 4.7290299999999998448 7.4322999999999996845 9.0410199999999996123 Since most decimal fractions can't be represented exactly by a ...


6

The only reason to avoid std::function is support of legacy compilers that lack support for this template, which has been introduced in C++11. If supporting pre-C++11 language is not a requirement, using std::function gives your callers more choice in implementing the callback, making it a better option compared to "plain" function pointers. It offers the ...


6

The standard doesn't specify whether std::vector::iterator is a class type, or a raw pointer. If it is a class type then this code calls operator= on the temporary object returned by a.end(). Not a very useful operation, but legal. (Rvalues may have functions called on them). If your library makes std::vector::iterator be a pointer then this code would ...


5

std::cout<< formats values into a readable form, and streams them to the standard output stream, which is called cout and, like most of the standard library, scoped inside a namespace called std. cout<< depends on what cout means in the current scope. If you've foolishly dumped some of the standard library into the global namespace with using ...


5

The second version declares a function with a parameter called mpl See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Most_vexing_parse and http://stackoverflow.com/tags/most-vexing-parse/info C++11 allows you to use braces to disambiguate initializations from declarations: TimeHandling time{std::chrono::milliseconds(mpl)}; or, using braces for both initializations: ...


5

The compiler itself does not have the definitions of the things that are in any namespace (whether it is std or some other namespace). That is the role of source files and header files. What using namespace std; tells the compiler is that "If you can't find some name in the current namespace, go look in the std namespace as well". What #include ...


5

No. This would break a lot of code, for instance in the standard headers, which does rely on new throwing. The C++ committee is aware of the danger introduced by standardizing dozens of almost-compatible languages under a single name, and with just 5 such options you already would have 32 incompatible languages.


4

There's no problem storing a non-copyable type in a vector; it's only required to be movable, as yours is. The problem is that this: mv.push_back(instance); tries to insert a copy of instance, and the class is not copyable. But it is movable: mv.push_back(std::move(instance)); Note that there's no need to write your own default and move constructors ...


4

You could use unnamed structs to make a hybrid struct where its member could be treated as an array: struct Foo { union { struct { int x; int y; int z; }; struct { int array[3]; }; }; }; LIVE DEMO Note however, that unnamed struct comes from C11 and its not a standard C++ feature. It is supported as an ...


4

In C++11, std::function's constructor taking an arbitrary functor type is specified as (quoting N3337 ยง20.8.11.2.1 [func.wrap.func.con]/p7): template<class F> function(F f); template <class F, class A> function(allocator_arg_t, const A& a, F f); 7 Requires: F shall be CopyConstructible. f shall be Callable (20.8.11.2) for argument ...


3

the map you are iterating over does not contain any elements. Your loop is: for(it = m.begin(); it != m.end(); ++it) but the only map that you ever fill is object["GREG"] = 1000; object["ROBERT"] = 2000; I don't know why you need the gymnastics with the references, but this code prints the objects in your code: #include <iostream> ...


3

e is a copy of the list items, so changes to it do not affect the items in the list. To do what you want, make e a reference: for (auto &e : kids)


3

This line TimeHandling time(std::chrono::milliseconds(mpl)); declares a function that returns a TimeHandling object, and take an std::chrono::milliseconds parameter named mpl. When a compiler faces the dilemma of considering this kind of statement either as a function declaration or as a constructor call, it's forced (by the standard) to consider it as ...


3

The line affect a temporary iterator, and so is useless. std::vector::iterator = std::vector::iterator is allowed. A way to disallow that would be to have std::vector::iterator::operator =(std::vector::iterator) &; // note the extra & but std::vector::iterator may be a simple pointer, and we can't disalow T* = T*


3

When you do #include <iostream> it causes a set of classes and other things to be included in your source file. For iostream, and most of the standard library headers, they place these things in a namespace named std. So the code for #include <iostream> looks something like this: namespace std { class cin { ... }; class cout { ... }; ...


3

Is it possible to keep function pointers in an std::vector? Sure, as long as they are all of the same type: void foo() { std::cout << "inside foo\n"; } void bar() { std::cout << "inside bar\n"; } void baz() { std::cout << "inside baz\n"; } std::vector<void(*)()> fps { foo, bar, baz }; And call each function ...


2

system calls fork, which will essentially double the needed RAM from your process. Since you're using 8 GB and only have 16 GB, you don't have enough, and the fork fails. That said, fork is implemented with copy-on-write pages, meaning that if you don't alter the memory of the child process, the RAM isn't actually duplicated. In this case, you wont be ...


2

Regarding the question in the title, “ Is every class, object, and function in c++ standard library declared under namespace std? no. For example, the global operator new allocation function is in the global namespace only.


2

Both seem to be the same things, but the first one is qualified by explicitly stating the namespace it is defined in.


2

cout function belongs to the std namespace and if you use this piece of code :using namespace std you can use it like cout << foo otherwise you should state the namespace like this: std::cout << foo


2

You cannot assign to an rvalue (aka temporary) primitive type in C++, like (int)7 or a pointer returned by-value from a function. This makes lots of sense, as the result of the assignment would be immediately discarded, so it is probably not what the programmer wanted. rvalue means 'right hand side of the = sign' from language grammars, or a temporary ...


2

Think of how you call compareFunc outside of the class. You always would have something like a.compareFunc(b, c) ^ ^ ^ which is 3 parameters, not 2. sort's code is outside your class and would have to use the syntax above. Making the member static allows this call: Solution::compareFunc(a, b) which is only 2 parameters and matches the ...


2

without static, &Solution::comparefunc's type is: bool (Solution::*) (const Interval& a, const Interval& b); with static, &Solution::comparefunc's type is: bool (*) (const Interval& a, const Interval& b);



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