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11

A a[2] = { 0, 1 }; Conceptually, this creates two temporary A objects, A(0) and A(1), and moves or copies them to initialise the array a; so a move or copy constructor is required. As an optimisation, the move or copy is allowed to be elided, which is why your program doesn't appear to use the move constructor. But there must still be a suitable ...


10

Use std::transform to copy with modification. std::transform(first1, last1, std::inserter(s1, s1.begin()), std::addressof<T>);


8

You are correct that closures are currently effectively trait objects, that is, they store a function pointer pointing to their actual code (similar to std::function in C++). This is known to be insufficent, and is not the final design, there is actually current work happening on "unboxed closures", which fix this, by making Rust's closures like C++11's ...


8

The problem is that comparing valarrays with == does not return a bool, it returns std::valarray<bool>, doing the comparison element-wise. If you want to compare them for equality, you can call min() on the result, since false < true: return (a*x==b).min();


7

The std::function move constructor is not guaranteed to not throw exceptions, so you have an exception safety issue. Since you are not using an RAII lock for m, it will remain locked if auto f = move(funs.front()); throws. You can correct the problem with std::unique_lock: std::unique_lock<decltype(m)> lock{m}; if (!funs.empty()) { auto f = ...


5

Standard containers own the elements they contain. That means copies are made of each element when you insert them. When your Garden is copied, the default copy constructor is used and, in turn, the Plant member is also default-copied. However, this means the new Plant contains a reference to the old Garden. In this case, that old Garden was the temporary ...


5

A a[2] = { 0, 1 }; This is aggregate initialization. §8.5.1/p2 of the standard provides that When an aggregate is initialized by an initializer list, as specified in 8.5.4, the elements of the initializer list are taken as initializers for the members of the aggregate, in increasing subscript or member order. Each member is copy-initialized from the ...


4

The reason why auto example = new Derived({ { 0, std::make_shared<Derived>() } }); works is that the compiler knows that it has to match the initializer {{ 0, std::make_shared<Derived>() }} somehow with the constructor Derived::Derived(std::initializer_list<std::pair<int, std::shared_ptr<Base>>>) {} So it is clear ...


4

Typo: you have a . instead of a ,: transform(vec.begin(), vec.end(). vec2.begin(), transformation()); ^ vec.end() is an iterator, and vec.end().vec2 attempts to access a member vec2 of that iterator. Next, you need to ensure that vec2 is large enough to take the transformed elements. You can instantiate it such that it has ...


4

The data contained in deque is not guaranteed to be placed in continuous memory block. This means that there could not be function similar to data() of vector.


3

[C++11: 21.5/3]: Throws: invalid_argument if strtol, strtoul, strtoll, or strtoull reports that no conversion could be performed. [..] [C99: 7.20.1.4/5]: If the subject sequence has the expected form and the value of base is zero, the sequence of characters starting with the first digit is interpreted as an integer constant according to the rules of ...


3

Your function takes the pList argument by value. This means that the PieceList container is copied when passed to the function, and the iterators used within constPieceFind all refer to this local copy of the container. The copy gets destroyed when the function returns, and the returned iterator no longer points to valid memory. Change the function so that ...


3

They behave the same way if you do the same thing int main() { std::shared_ptr<int> foo; std::shared_ptr<int> bar(new int(10)); foo = bar; *bar = 20; std::cout << "*foo: " << *foo << '\n'; std::cout << "*bar: " << *bar << '\n'; std::cin.get(); return 0; }


3

Simply rename the parameter name. Its name hides the std::vector name. Or write the erroneous line the following way class vector<B> converted_vector; that is use the elaborated type name for std::vector that to distinguish it from object (parameter) vector. The code of the function can be written in different ways. For example template<class ...


3

The problem is that your NULL is being passed to the std::remove as a integer, and not as a pointer. If using C++11 is an option, use nullptr instead of NULL (both in your for loop and inside std::remove). If it isn't, cast NULL to the appropriate type: objects.erase(std::remove(objects.begin(), objects.end(), static_cast<myObj*>(NULL)), ...


3

Based on your problem description, it sounds like you need a predicate that tests whether the given object interacts with ANY other object in the vector. In other words, it sounds like you need a std::remove_if with std::find_if as part of its predicate. The approach below uses a lambda function, and thus requires C++11. You could avoid this with a simple ...


3

std::tie requires lvalues. Point's x(), y(), and z() functions don't return references, hence they give rvalues. A simple fix might be providing reference returning getters (e.g. double& x()) for Point, or at least: double ax = a.eP.x(); double ay = a.eP.y(); double az = a.eP.z(); double bx = b.eP.x(); double by = b.eP.y(); double bz = b.eP.z(); return ...


2

You cannot use std::remove_if() with sequences which have const parts. The sequence of std::set<T> elements are made up of T const objects. We actually discussed this question just yesterday at the standard C++ committee and there is some support to create algorithms dealing specifically with the erase()ing objects from containers. It would look ...


2

std::remove_if re-orders elements, so it cannot be used with std::set. But you can use std::set::erase: std::set<int> a; a.erase(10);


2

You want this: std::string pattern = "\xDD\xAF\x57\x42"; Otherwise, it tries to read your entire hex code in as one char, which then is truncated to only the last 8 bits.


2

No, the double-ended queue is a dynamically growing data structure. Unlike the std::vector it is not layed-out in memory like an array but as arbitrary memory locations pointing to the previous and to the next memory section.


2

In ListCompare::operator() you need to take the parameters as const references. class ListCompare { public: bool operator()(const Node& pNode1, const Node& pNode2) const { return pNode1.getTotalCost() > pNode2.getTotalCost(); } };


2

So, I don't believe that your current code works for all cases. And therefore, I think it needs a larger fix. For example, let's assume that you have 3 objects in your vector, and all 3 of them interact. Your code will grab the first two, and then remove them. When we get to the third, there won't be anything for it to interact with, so it will remain. But ...


2

What prevented you from reading the documentation? == does not work in this way for valarrays. It compares each element index-wise and returns a new valarray of bools containing each result. Indeed, the entire purpose of valarrays is to enable quick and easy operations on an ordered set of values without having to resort to writing loops everywhere.


2

An std::ostream is not copiable; it has mutable state and is polymorphic, which make copy and assignment problematic. In C++11, it is movable, if you want the caller to give up all posession (but you'll have to explicitly move it). Most of the time, however, you don't want a copy of the string, nor unique ownership; in those cases, you make the member a ...


1

The function std::mem_fun is defined in the header <functional>. On some older compilers, you don't necessarily need to #include a standard library header in order to use functions and classes defined in that header, because it might already be included by some other standard library header that you #include. This is not exclusive to VS; it was also ...


1

If you need to just debug, rather than make some already chosen tool work, I can share this code: dlog.h: #include <android/log.h> #define LOGD(...) __android_log_print(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG , "~~~~~~", __VA_ARGS__) #define DLOG(...) __android_log_print(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG , "~~~~~~", __VA_ARGS__) #define LOGE(...) __android_log_print(ANDROID_LOG_ERROR ...


1

1 - All the entities (variables, types, constants, and functions) of the standard C++ library are declared within the std namespace. using namespace std; introduces direct visibility of all the names of the std namespace into the code. ref: http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/namespaces/ 2 - Namespaces in C++ are most often used to avoid naming ...


1

Well, toFind is an std::string and &toFind takes its address. So what you are doing is this: std::string const* addr = &toFind; std::find (xmlString.begin(), xmlString.end(), addr); So you are trying to find a pointer inside a std::string which doesn't work. What you want is something like this: std::size_t count_substr(std::string const& ...


1

Maybe not more efficient, but shorter: void load(size_t n) { m_buffer.erase( m_buffer.begin(), m_buffer.begin()+m_cursor); m_cursor=0; if(m_buffer.size() < n) std::copy_n(std::istream_iterator<char>(std::cin), n - m_buffer.size(), std::back_inserter(m_buffer)); }



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