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3

You can't. Your container is invalid because its element type must be copy-assignable or move-assignable, and yours is neither. This isn't diagnosed at construction, but you've already seen the resulting compilation error that occurs when you try to perform operations that rely on this property. You could make it legal and compilable by overloading the copy ...


-3

If you don't want to use heap allocated objects, you can define an assignment operator in ConstClass that uses a const_cast class ConstClass { public: explicit ConstClass(int variable) : variable_(variable) {} ConstClass & operator=(ConstClass && that) { std::swap(const_cast<int&>(variable_), ...


1

By specifying const member you are disabling the default assignment operator and you should not do the tricks/hacks to go around that limitation. You can instead use smart pointers (unique or shared if you need shared ownership), for example like that: int main(){ std::deque<std::unique_ptr<ConstClass> > objects; ...


1

Some more context to the problem would be useful, how have you ended up here? What's the purpose of ConstClass and why does it have to be const? Assuming there's good reasons you can't fix this without hacking, you could do this: int main() { std::deque<std::shared_ptr<ConstClass>> objects; ...


3

Look at what your format is matching: "%[^'\t'],%[^'\t'] ^ ^ ^ \ | \- match a literal comma \ | \---+- match a sequence not containing tab or ' (single quote), up to the next tab or single quite. So the first %[..] matches everything up to and not including the first tab in the input, and then it tries to match a comma, which ...


2

When you use a comma to separate the fields, you'll have to add a , to the format string so as to skip it. Similarly for the \t. #include <math.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> void test1() { char *tokenstring = "first,25.5,second,15"; int result, i; double fp; char o[10], f[10], s[10], t[10]; // ...


1

I solved it on mine (redhat, clang 3.4, gcc 4.7.2). By default this project was linking against /usr/lib/libstdc++. I have a build of gcc 4.7.2 installed in a separate location; when I add lines analogous to the following to the link step it works fine -L${GCC_PATH}/lib -Wl,-R${GCC_PATH}/lib ... provided they appear in the link step before analogous ...


0

Iterators can never be null. If an iterator does not point to anything, it's value is end(). I think it's OK for you to return end(). Usually the user uses an iterator to iterate over something, and when they iterate it is their responsibility to check whether they have reached the end or not, and the only way to check is to compare the iterator's value with ...


0

It doesn't make sense to return an iterator that can be from different lists. There is no way to check whether the iterator is valid. The best way in your approach is to return a pointer to the actual object being stored and that can be null. On the other hand, what you could do if you insist to return an iterator is having a method in Wrapper to check the ...


0

Typically the solution would be to have an accessor to the beginning and end iterator of the container, so adding a class Wrapper { public: std::list<People>::iterator end(); }; Would allow you do write the following: Wrapper wo; std::list<People>::iterator it = wo.getMeTheNextPeople(); if(it == wo.end()){ // do something here } However ...


0

Return the standard "beyond the range iterator": wo.end();


1

Returning a list iterator, when the user doesn't have access to the list which the iterator is coming from, is weird and ugly. Why not return a pointer to a People instead, which can be NULL?


0

std::string replace(std::string base, const std::string from, const std::string to) { std::string SecureCopy = base; for (size_t start_pos = SecureCopy.find(from); start_pos != std::string::npos; start_pos = SecureCopy.find(from,start_pos)) { SecureCopy.replace(start_pos, from.length(), to); } return SecureCopy; }


3

do I have to allocate the buffer myself and then assign it to a unique_ptr? Not just a buffer, a pointer to an object. But the object might need to be destroyed by the allocator, and the memory definitely needs to deallocated by the allocator, so you also need to pass the allocator the the unique_ptr. It doesn't know how to use an allocator, so you ...


4

Why does shared_ptr have allocate_shared while unique_ptr does not have allocate_unique? shared_ptr needs it so that it can allocate its internal shared state (the reference count and deleter), as well as the shared object, using the allocator. unique_ptr only manages the object; so there is no need to provide an allocator to the unique_ptr itself, and ...


0

Something like this : #include <iostream> #include <initializer_list> #include <vector> #include <list> struct MyClass { template <typename It > void Add( It b, It e ) { data_.insert( end(data_), b, e ); } void Add( std::initializer_list<int> const & elems ) { Add( begin(elems), ...


2

That's because you are creating an std::stringstream, which doesn't derive from an std::ostringstream. Just create an std::ostringstream, and the bad_cast should disappear. Having said that, reusing the std::ostringstream many times like this is generally not a good idea; the iostream classes are full of state, which will not be reset between each use. ...


0

To build on Oli's solution (http://stackoverflow.com/a/5056797/2472351) using multimaps, you can replace the two template functions he used with the following: template <typename A, typename B> multimap<B, A> flip_map(map<A,B> & src) { multimap<B,A> dst; for(map<A, B>::const_iterator it = src.begin(); it != ...


3

You call: advance(it, 5); However, advancing by 4 gets you to firstlist.end(). You can't advance further without undefined behaviour.


2

The function does precisely what the documentation that you linked says that it should do: If the function can determine the next higher permutation, it rearranges the elements as such and returns true. If that was not possible (because it is already at the largest possible permutation), it rearranges the elements according to the first permutation ...


0

next_permutation sorts the array if it returns false, so this is the expected behavior. This is described here on cppreference. Hope this helps!


1

find would not return true. Such a find would be pretty damn useless. The real std::string::find returns the position of the found string. Knowing the position, you can now separate your string into the "before" and "after" part using std::string::substr.


1

If you are assuming that input will always begin with n and end with the number under the radical, you can use std::string::front() to access the first element and std::string::back() to access the last element.


3

Like 0x499602D2 noted in the commments, you can use std::stringstream to read from string just as you would do with any other stream (like std::cin): #include <sstream> #include <iostream> #include <string> int main() { int a, b; std::stringstream ss(std::stringstream::in | std::stringstream::out); ss << "12 14"; ss ...


4

In C++11 we have a few new overloads of pow(std::complex). GCC has two nonstandard overloads on top of that, one for raising to an int and one for raising to an unsigned int. One of the new standard overloads (namely std::complex</*Promoted*/> pow(const std::complex<T> &, const U &)) causes an ambiguity when calling pow(i, 2) with the ...


0

You need to get into a different mode when you are using floating point numbers. Floating points are APPROXIMATIONS of real numbers. 1.22461e-016 is 0.0000000000000000122461 An engineer would say that IS zero. You will always get such variations (unless you stick to operations on sums of powers of 2 with the same general range. A value as simple 0.1 ...


5

is_convertible is defined as follows in [meta.rel]/4 from n3485: Given the following function prototype: template <class T> typename add_rvalue_reference<T>::type create(); the predicate condition for a template specialization is_convertible<From, To> shall be satisfied if and only if the return expression in the following code ...


2

Apple released a new GM seed for Xcode 5.1.1. In the release notes they say they fixed a couple crashes: Fixed a compiled code crash on when targeting iOS 5.1.1. (16485980)! Fixed a compiled code crash when using ARC and C++. (16368824) http://adcdownload.apple.com//Developer_Tools/xcode_5.1.1_gm_seed/release_notes_xcode_5.1.1_gm_seed.pdf


5

This has nothing to do with std::enable_shared_from_this; it's the general scenario of multiple inheritance. Inside a member function of class X, the type of this is X*, i.e. it points to the X subobject of the complete object. So when calling A::fa() on a B object, this refers to the A subobject of B. That can be offset from the object's initial address, ...


1

Generally no container is "thread-safe". It's just a container. I would recommend you to make it thread safe yourself. Creating an std::lock_guard object with an std::mutex on the stack will make your code thread-safe. Hope it helps: Below a code example: std::mutex lockMutex; std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(lockMutex);


3

Generically, you can get a ubyte[] out of any memory by casting it to a pointer, then slicing it: ubyte[] buffer = (cast(ubyte*)&myStruct)[0 .. myStruct.sizeof]); Someone on the chat room a couple days ago showed an even shorted way to do it, but I don't remember what it was... A D array is a pointer and length pair so conceptually, it is the same as ...


0

Well - map is keeping the key and the data as a pair so you can extract key by dereferecing the map's iterator into pair or directly into pair's first element. std::map<string, int> myMap; std::map<string, int>::iterator it; for(it=myMap.begin();it!=myMap.end();it++) { std::cout<<it->first<<std::endl; }


3

When you are keeping your vector list sorted while inserting elements one by one , you are basically performing an insertion sort, that theoretically runs O(n^2) in worst case. The average case is also quadratic, which makes insertion sort impractical for sorting large arrays. With your input of ~30000 , it will be better to take all inputs and then sort it ...


1

Keeping the vector sorted during insertion would result in quadratic performance since on average you'll have to shift down approximately half the vector for each item inserted. Sorting once at the end would be n log(n), rather faster. Depending on your needs it's also possible that set or map may be more appropriate.


1

You will have to wrap std::complex in your complex class: class Complex { public: explicit Complex(std::complex& value) : m_value(value) {} ... operator std::complex& () { return m_value; } operator const std::complex& () const { return m_value; } ... private: std::complex m_value; } This will be necessary for getting ...


1

As per here in C++11: For any object z of type complex<T>, reinterpret_cast<T(&)[2]>(z)[0] is the real part of z and reinterpret_cast<T(&)[2]>(z)[1] is the imaginary part of z. For any pointer to an element of an array of complex<T> named p and any valid array index i, reinterpret_cast<T*>(p)[2*i] is the real ...


2

Nope. You could derive from std::complex<> and inherit constructors and add an overridden operator[], but I would advise against it.


0

The concept of a "screen" only applies if you're doing a console application. To use the curses library, you need to link your project with it. In the project file (.pro), add the following line: LIBS += -lcurses


-1

[From the source page:] The Curses library is designed for working with the console. Advantages: it is cross-platform. Disadvantages: it doesn't interact well with the standard streams. In other words, you shouldn't mix printf() and the like or cout and the like with Curses. Use Standard I/O or Curses, but not both. (You can still employ Standard I/O with ...


0

I solve the problem by copying the content folder C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\VC from a different computer that had Visual Studio 2012 Ultimate.


0

You can try LOCAL_CFLAGS := -std=c++11, or implement it yourself. #include <string> #include <sstream> template <typename T> std::string to_string(T value) { std::ostringstream os ; os << value ; return os.str() ; } int main() { std::string perfect = to_string(5) ; }


1

You should provide library arguments after the translation unit that uses them: clang++ listTest.cpp -lstdc++ I should note that I couldn't reproduce your issue, but that could easily be down to differences in version/configuration (particularly w.r.t. a stdlib implementation selected for use by default).


1

not sure if this would help you, but there's Boost.Accumulators with its rolling_sum.


2

The standard library offers no such functionality. You need to implement it yourself.


1

As Clang tells you, put typename in front of the iterator type: template<typename T> void transferOne(vector<std::unique_ptr<T> > &to, typename vector<std::unique_ptr<T> >::iterator what, vector<std::unique_ptr<T> > &from) { to.push_back(std::move(*what)); ...


2

You can undefine the macro: #undef max Edit: It seems the macros can be safely disabled by putting #define NOMINMAX before the header files that define them (most likely windef.h, which you probably include indirectly).


3

If there is just one element to removed it seems the approch to go is to use std::find_if() rather than std::remove_if() and locate the object in the specific range: auto it = std::find_if(v.begin() + index1, v.begin() + index2, pred); if (it != v.begin() + index2) { v.erase(it); } If there are potentially more elements you could use ...


0

v.erase( std::remove_if( std::begin(v) + index1, std::begin(v) + index2, pred), std::begin(v) + index2 );


0

This will only search between index1 and index2, NOT including either index. It's up to you to make sure the range is still valid. v.erase( std::remove_if( std::begin(v) + index1 + 1, std::begin(v) + index2, pred), v.begin() + index2);


0

string is in std namespace, it's only valid to use std::string rather than string (the same for std::cin, std::vector etc). However, in practice, some compilers may let a program using string etc without std:: prefix compile, which makes some programmers think it's OK to omit std::, but it's not in standard C++. So it's best to use: #include ...



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